1979 Horse Management Book - My how things have changed!!...

shell1978

Well-Known Member
Joined
22 April 2008
Messages
475
Visit site
Been having a laugh this afternoon reading said book!!! Thought I would share a few snippetts from it!! Enjoy.....

‘A big heavy head is always a bad fault, puts a horse out of balance & also causes it to be easily tired.’

‘The horse to be avoided is one that has an outstanding lump between his eyes; in the majority of cases, if it is not absolutely vicious, it will have some mental kink.’

‘When the coat is thoroughly brushed and clean, you should hand rub him all over for about ¼ hr. Both hands and forearm should be used’

‘You should have been at it (grooming!) for at least an hour, and you should be tired, if you are not you have not done the job properly’.

‘An unkempt overgrown mane is a disgrace, of which can be overcome by hogging’.

‘An overgrown hog stands up straight and spoils the whole look of the horse, and gives away your idleness to the world'

‘Hairs around a horses lips should never be cut’

‘All horse clothing should be kept scrupulously clean’

‘You will need 8 weeks for the job (bringing horse back into work), and first will bring him back into the stable & give him a moderate laxative to clear the body of any waste. This is a routine action you must not fail to take’

‘Do not exercise with rugs or any other clothing on’

‘The good doer is a joy for ever, and a poor mans blessing’

Colic: ‘if there is no relief within an hr or so, sacrifice your brandy, rum or whisky – half a tumbler at a time. If this does not do the trick, call the vet’

‘Hacking out: ride easily and loosely, never mind about riding school and all that’

grin.gif
 

spider

Well-Known Member
Joined
14 October 2004
Messages
1,537
community.webshots.com
I think the basic facts are the same though it is worded quite amusingly. I like the one about the good doer. I often think how much money mine is saving me when I see others loading up their cars with sacks of food.
 

shell1978

Well-Known Member
Joined
22 April 2008
Messages
475
Visit site
Yes I would probably say so, like this one for instance I still believe in:

‘Hairs around a horses lips should never be cut’

But many more people lop them off now than leave them on.
 

shell1978

Well-Known Member
Joined
22 April 2008
Messages
475
Visit site
God I must be a bad mum then!!!! Maybe if I was a lady of leisure she would get groomed for an hour a day (or pay someone to do it!!!!)
grin.gif
 

MurphysMinder

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 November 2006
Messages
17,952
Location
Shropshire
Visit site
Are you sure that ws a book written in 1979, not a reprint of a much older one. I had owned horses for more than 10 years by 1979 and none of the books I had were worded like that. Some of the ideas though are perfectly sound and valid today.
Interestingly, our pony was penalised in best turnout (leaid rein) at her last show because her whiskers hadn't been trimmed.
frown.gif
 

Ebenezer_Scrooge

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 July 2008
Messages
4,423
Location
Under the duvet....
Visit site
[ QUOTE ]


‘An overgrown hog stands up straight and spoils the whole look of the horse, and gives away your idleness to the world'



[/ QUOTE ]

Oh dear and my horse has a mohican at the moment........
blush.gif


*makes note to self to get the clippers out*
grin.gif
 

Janette

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 January 2002
Messages
2,294
Location
West Yorks
Visit site
idleness is a very strong word isn't it.
Mind in thoose days, coloured horses were not exactly desirable.

Just worked it out - 1979 was 30 year ago. I left school in 1979........
 

ghosthooves

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 February 2007
Messages
951
Location
London
Visit site
[ QUOTE ]
‘You should have been at it (grooming!) for at least an hour, and you should be tired, if you are not you have not done the job properly’.


[/ QUOTE ]

My instructor still teaches everyone that one
grin.gif
grin.gif
 

flowerlady

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 January 2008
Messages
5,496
Location
May be somewhere near
Visit site
[ QUOTE ]
I went hunting on a smart coloured cob in the early 80's and was told to take that cow off the hunting field and not bring it back!

[/ QUOTE ]

PMSL
laugh.gif
laugh.gif
tongue.gif


I think some still hold today. I would never trim lip hairs.
frown.gif
 

blackcob

🖖
Joined
20 March 2007
Messages
12,244
Location
Shropshire
Visit site
Some of those still hold true! I was always brought up to believe that a thorough grooming should leave you sweating and the horse gleaming.
tongue.gif


I have a 1979 Pony Club Manual of Horsemanship which I think is utterly brilliant - complete no-nonsense advice and its intolerance of gadgetry is outstanding. There's only about three bits listed in it for starters, with the pelham listed as 'severe'.
grin.gif
 

Pearlsasinger

Up in the clouds
Joined
20 February 2009
Messages
45,632
Location
W. Yorks
Visit site
[ QUOTE ]
Are you sure that ws a book written in 1979, not a reprint of a much older one. I had owned horses for more than 10 years by 1979 and none of the books I had were worded like that. Some of the ideas though are perfectly sound and valid today.

<font color="blue"> I would think that it was published much earlier than 1979. I've just worked out that we got our first horse in 1975 and read as much as we could on stable management but don't remember anything as archaic as that </font>

Interestingly, our pony was penalised in best turnout (leaid rein) at her last show because her whiskers hadn't been trimmed.
frown.gif


[/ QUOTE ]

<font color="blue"> We refuse to trim muzzle hairs too and would tell the judge why in your situation (don't like hogged manes either) </font>
 

0ldmare

Well-Known Member
Joined
22 September 2004
Messages
7,424
Location
Kent
Visit site
I do think this is a reprint - Ive had horses for that long (ahem, actually longer), and it isnt written in any way that I recall.

That said, I do think we have lost the art or grooming. I know I am guilty of it - a quick flick with the brush and thats it unless I'm off to a show!
blush.gif


A couple I do agree with though - this one - having had a horse with a noticeably domed forehead that was an absolute headcase I would certainly avoid one:

<font color="blue"> The horse to be avoided is one that has an outstanding lump between his eyes; in the majority of cases, if it is not absolutely vicious, it will have some mental kink.’ </font>‘

I dont like trimming whiskers, although did when I used to show at county

Yes, agree with good doer (unless it gets lami!)
wink.gif
:

<font color="blue"> ‘The good doer is a joy for ever, and a poor mans blessing’ </font>‘

Where I originally lived there were no vets * at all * so you did your best when things went wrong. I remember my Dad 'dosing' my mum's mare with gin when she had colic. She rather enjoyed it I think (she lived to tell the tale). Not sure I would do it now though lol
grin.gif
I seem to recall she had about 1/3 of a bottle, not a tumbler though
crazy.gif


<font color="blue"> Colic: ‘if there is no relief within an hr or so, sacrifice your brandy, rum or whisky – half a tumbler at a time. If this does not do the trick, call the vet’ </font>‘
 

shell1978

Well-Known Member
Joined
22 April 2008
Messages
475
Visit site
You were right, it is a re-print. Originally published in 1951!!!
Thats quite shocking about your pony's whiskers!
 

Dubsie

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 January 2009
Messages
4,756
Location
The Edge of Suburbia, Berkshire.
Visit site
I've a first edition 1948 book 'Ponies and Riders, a book of instruction for young riders' by Mrs Victor Hurst amongst my collection of old books, it also suggests that it takes a long time to groom a pony well: 'twenty minutes may do the job up to a point : to make a thoroughly finished business of it takes anything up to an hour'
For colic '...It should have a colic drink: there are various sorts that caan be made at home, including a mixture of hot beer and ginger, a dessertspoonful of the latter....If the pony does not get better in two or three hours, send for the vet..'
The write is also critical about conformation:
'A lot can be told as to character from a pony's hea and eye, as one with a kiind, bold eye and a nice expression has as a rule, a nice temperament. An eye set high up in the head shows commonness, especially if it is small and "piggy". Again, a horse or pony that has a noticably prominent bone between its eyes is often quite nappy...'
(sorry Gorgeous George!)

Lots of very entertaining advice eg
'Remember to look after your saddle and see that it is nice and soft inside (beating with a light cane will help this)'
and in the first aid hints section
'Sore back lotion for Hardening Backs
1oz Powdered Alum, 1oz Sugar of Lead, 1/2 pint Methylated Spirit, 1/2 pint water, shake well apply with sponge night and morning and also after returning from a ride - it should be applied wherever the saddle bears on the back. Cover with a clean rubber and do not replace the rug till it has dried off: leave the rubber under the rug '
Surely there was a risk of lead poisoning?
shocked.gif


There's lots about dress, and that 'despite coupons you should do your best to get a nice habit by a good maker'
For showing, ..'when riding in a Hack class at one of the big shows, where a top hat is the correct wear, a black habit is by far the smartest.
A veil MUST be worn with a top hat; and a bowler - or Billy Coke hat - also looks much better if a veil is added. '

What's a 'Billy Coke' hat and who was he??
 

Maesfen

Extremely Old Nag!
Joined
20 June 2005
Messages
16,720
Location
Wynnstay - the Best!
photobucket.com
I'm not being an old fogey but I find it hard to believe that you all seem to think that book is too fussy and incredibly amusing.
There's so much sense written there that is still valid and I'll make myself very unpopular by saying that if people weren't taught most of those things, then their instructors weren't up to the mark. Everything written there is either for the benefit of the horse, no more no less, or good observations on their characters or faults which still apply nowadays.
Some of the old books are worth their weight in gold, far better written and you could do a lot worse than read a few as they can have a lot to teach us about horses, even now. While I appreciate that people have to learn somewhere, I have to admit to being shocked at some of the most basic questions asked on here sometimes and these are from those that already own a horse/pony. I can't believe that some go into horse ownership without reading and learning the basics first properly; it just seems a crash site waiting to happen with the poor horse as a crash dummy. Sorry, off my soapbox now..................
blush.gif


ps: I've got Mrs Hurst's book too!
 

Tinypony

Well-Known Member
Joined
31 December 2006
Messages
5,211
Visit site
Well, I'm with them 100% about the face hairs, such a mean practise. And if you rub your horse all over after grooming, you are giving them a nice 15 minute massage, so that can't be bad either.
 

MurphysMinder

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 November 2006
Messages
17,952
Location
Shropshire
Visit site
There is a Mrs Victor Hurst trophy awarded in my daughters old pony club (N Shropshire). I think she was quite a name in the Pony Club locally in the 40s/50s.
I have always known the lump some horses have between their eyes as a "bossy bump, I know one mare with this bump and she is very nappy, won't hack out alone etc but a very talented jumper.
 

Maesfen

Extremely Old Nag!
Joined
20 June 2005
Messages
16,720
Location
Wynnstay - the Best!
photobucket.com
[ QUOTE ]
There is a Mrs Victor Hurst trophy awarded in my daughters old pony club (N Shropshire). I think she was quite a name in the Pony Club locally in the 40s/50s.
I have always known the lump some horses have between their eyes as a "bossy bump, I know one mare with this bump and she is very nappy, won't hack out alone etc but a very talented jumper.

[/ QUOTE ]

Mrs Hurst used to be a Joint Master of the North Shropshire and snap about bossy bumps even although I was at the other end of the country!
 
Top