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kateandluelue

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Charities are bursting at the seams !! they have been for years. Why don't you ring round a couple, and the ask them about the massive task they are facing, and then those rose coloured specs might come off. In the 1990's I had an oldie who was permanently Lame (high ring bone) but lively and happy. I spoke to a number of charities, all were full then !! oh and Brandsby Home of Rest's advice to me was to PTS. She was lame and could not be ridden so this is different, but at age 27 things are likely to not going to be good for long.

I don't agree with putting down a middle aged cat or dog either, but the arguments above are different I think when you have an older horse, getting past mid teens, I think you should expect to be stuck with them for life really.

Ester is right about loan homes not always being what they seem, no matter how well you vet them.

It is a sad truth that many people do not value what they have not paid for, charities are full ( check this and see) and to try and pass on a 27 year old is to leave it to its fate - yes there is always a chance that it might get a good home, but I fear that this chance is very slim indeed. I think this is an owner shirking her responsibilities, the last kindness we can do our old horses is ensuring they are okay at the end of their life.

Its also worth considering how charities are funded....its those of us who care, who ( in the main) are propping up those who are shirking their responsibilities. Sorry to sound harsh but when you take on an animal this is a big commitment and that cant be emphasised enough really
I agree with this.

Also, this situation cant really be compared with cats or dogs, because although those charaties are bursting at the seams too, i think in comparison its cheaper for a cat rescue for example to take on an elderly cat than a horse rescue to take on an elderly horse, which arguably are more expensive to keep and harder to rehome.
 

honetpot

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As someone who has had a field full of pensioners I would rather have the hunt than try than give them away. I have seen a couple of old or long term lame horses on FB, looking for for ever homes which I think is a real cheek.
I have bought older animals in their teens and have factored in the chances that they would have a short working life. I have paid a fair price and they have ended their days in the field.I would rather loan and pay the knacker my self(have done that) than leave the responsibity to someone else.
 

SpringArising

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If an owner who loves her old guy cannot keep him anymore due to their personal reasons, they reserve the right to choose to re-home them, they are NOT a bad owner to try for this option they are a caring owner trying to find someone who wants hims in his final years.

There is NO harm in that considering she has said she would vet the home.

Yes if the horse is in a lot of pain or quality of life is compromised but that is not the case with this guy.................
Completely agree. I would much rather see an old/er horse go on to a new home to be kept active both physically and mentally than sit stagnant in a field somewhere for God knows how many years. What sort of quality of life is that?

All the healthy oldies I know and have known are the ones who have been kept in work and active.

Of course there's a risk of something bad happening to the horse - but there's also no less of a risk to the thousands of young companion horses and bog-standard broodmares who go for peanuts. Should we kill all horses who aren't in a certain price or age bracket?
 

ILuvCowparsely

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Who mentioned cats!? I would have an old one of those PTS too before I handed it to a charity!

I've known plenty of loan homes be vetted and not end up being what they seem, the risk of that on a ftgh is much higher.

Faracat I think it's easy to assume that everyone is nice and honest when you can't imagine being anything different but that sadly that just isn't the case and going off fb groups TM is certainly not the only one.

I was making a comparison which pardon me I am allowed to do am I not. I was merely pointing out that trying to find an old horse a new home in his twilight years due to owners change of circumstances is NO different than a cat been trying to find a new home due to owners not wanting or cannot keep it any more due to financial circumstances.

The owner of this poor horse is and seems to be thinking of the horses future with a new loving owner.
 

TGM

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Prior to the Ted's Mum saga, we also had a situation on the forum where a poster had a horse with a degenerating fetlock and asked advice about rehoming him. Lots of people suggested PTS, others said it would be fine if home was vetted. The horse went off 'free to good home' to a lady who sounded lovely and just wanted him as a companion. Previous owner had been sensible and endorsed the passport saying the horse was unfit to be ridden. Imagine her dismay when it was discovered that just a few days later he had been issued with a new passport, presumably buted up and passed through the sales as a riding horse. :(

Unfortunately, 'free to a good home' ads automatically attract those who wish to make a quick buck and are quite happy to bute horses up, lie about age etc., to maximise their profit. Sadly, many of them are very convincing at seeming genuine and offering a 'forever home'.
 

ILuvCowparsely

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Charities are bursting at the seams !! they have been for years. Why don't you ring round a couple, and the ask them about the massive task they are facing, and then those rose coloured specs might come off. In the 1990's I had an oldie who was permanently Lame (high ring bone) but lively and happy. I spoke to a number of charities, all were full then !! oh and Brandsby Home of Rest's advice to me was to PTS. She was lame and could not be ridden so this is different, but at age 27 things are likely to not going to be good for long.

I don't agree with putting down a middle aged cat or dog either, but the arguments above are different I think when you have an older horse, getting past mid teens, I think you should expect to be stuck with them for life really.

Ester is right about loan homes not always being what they seem, no matter how well you vet them.

It is a sad truth that many people do not value what they have not paid for, charities are full ( check this and see) and to try and pass on a 27 year old is to leave it to its fate - yes there is always a chance that it might get a good home, but I fear that this chance is very slim indeed. I think this is an owner shirking her responsibilities, the last kindness we can do our old horses is ensuring they are okay at the end of their life.

Its also worth considering how charities are funded....its those of us who care, who ( in the main) are propping up those who are shirking their responsibilities. Sorry to sound harsh but when you take on an animal this is a big commitment and that cant be emphasised enough really

EXCUSE ME !!!!!!! I have been a foster home with pens for the CPL charity for NI on 9 years so I am in a better position to say how *we* are fixed for spaces than most, and I might add ONE of my pens is empty now waiting for another CPL cat to come in AND we always put to the top of the list emergency housing first. Many cats who have come into me have jumped the queue for a space through people dying and one I might add recently the owner committed suicide the cats in their 17 and 16 age bracket came straight into my pens. They I might add have both found a new home, So thank you I do not need to ring round unless I ring myself up LOL.
 
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Mooseontheloose

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It is a proven fact that horses suffer immense stress when changing homes, which is often why a horse will colic very soon after a change. Not only that, if their sight or hearing is not as good as it was they may have problems orienting themselves. This is a very emotive subject but I would never let a very old horse of mine go anywhere else where you cannot guarantee a standard of care or that it may not then pass on to someone else.
I have a pony of this age loaned to a home where he comes back to me in the event of them being unable to keep him any longer. He is still fit and well, being regularly ridden and sound. I have the space and time to have retirees but I know when it's time to call it a day and they are put down here by someone who they know with their head in a bucket of food.
We owe them that.
 

picolenicole

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I would have him if he was closer :(

I have just signed a years loan contract for a 22 year old 13.1hh pony, that the owner still wants riding and just having time spent on him as she has moved to Spain. I wanted a friend for my horse, anything extra (riding etc) is a bonus to me, and after having him for three months on trail I couldn't imagine not having him. As long as he's happy and my horse is happy I am and as long as his owner is willing to let me keep him he will stay until the end.

I've also rehomed two sister cats :) that where a handful but have come round and I can sleep at night knowing me and OH prevented them both from being PTS.
 

TGM

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EXCUSE ME !!!!!!! I have been a foster home with pens for the CPL for NI on 9 years so I am in a better position to say how we are fixed for spaces than most, and I might add ONE of my pens is empty now waiting for another CPL cat to come in AND we always put to the top of the list emergency housing first . So thank you I do not need to ring round unless I ring myself up LOL.
I think she was talking about horse charities!
 

ILuvCowparsely

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EXCUSE ME !!!!!!! I have been a foster home with pens for the CPL charity for NI on 9 years so I am in a better position to say how *we* are fixed for spaces than most, and I might add ONE of my pens is empty now waiting for another CPL cat to come in AND we always put to the top of the list emergency housing first. Many cats who have come into me have jumped the queue for a space through people dying and one I might add recently the owner committed suicide the cats in their 17 and 16 age bracket came straight into my pens. They I might add have both found a new home, So thank you I do not need to ring round unless I ring myself up LOL.

deleted
 

ILuvCowparsely

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I think she was talking about horse charities!
No difference to me since my horses are being gifted into WHW if something happens to me they told me they always take emergency horses in.

Not obviously the no longer keep situations that is down to the owner to choose the options they want.

I do not see why this lady's situation should be dragged through the mire, just because individuals here would kill their horse if they cannot longer keep it does NOT mean everyone thinks that way and nor does it mean they are less than a loving home because they want to try find it a new home instead of shooting it.

I think it is very unfair to judge this poor owner because the previous situations where the loan home or permanent home or sale went sour.
 

TGM

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I actually DO think it is useful to discuss this horse's situation, as lots of people are unaware of the dangers of gifting horse 'free to a good home' and are unaware that people as duplicitous as TM exist and can be very convincing. If reading this thread can stop even one horse being rehomed to such people, then it is a good thing in my book.
 

Smurf's Gran

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HGA -12 your sentiments are admirable. It would be lovely to live in a world where loving homes abounded. Unfortunately I don't think that is the case. If you could be sure that a very elderly free horse would be found a lovely home then of course that would be great. Personally, I think the chances of a good outcome for this horse are not good, and as a horse lover personally I would not take that risk. While as other posters point out, we don't know the owners circumstances, I feel we do know enough - a 27 year old horse is being passed on for free ?? human nature being what it is, sadly I feel that majority will not think there is an old horse who will be my loved pet, but rather I can make a few quid from this ??

I suppose if the owner does read this she will be upset, but I would rather she be upset and the horse be safe, cared for or at the very least not having to suffer. We have a responsibility to our pets for their lifetimes. HGA I think the work you do sounds admirable, but I do not think cat and horse charities are the same at all ( not sure how cats came into it really) I would say that a cat is far easier to support in a charity than a horse. Cats take up less space and are a lot cheaper.
 

TGM

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I suppose if the owner does read this she will be upset, but I would rather she be upset and the horse be safe, cared for or at the very least not having to suffer. We have a responsibility to our pets for their lifetimes. HGA I think the work you do sounds admirable, but I do not think cat and horse charities are the same at all ( not sure how cats came into it really) I would say that a cat is far easier to support in a charity than a horse. Cats take up less space and are a lot cheaper.
Well said!
 

SpringArising

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I have just scanned the WHW website. There are plenty of horses and ponies up for 'rehoming' which are ready to be taken on for as little as £20. Ok, sure; they go out on loan (although I find that a little strange given that someone can pay up to £400 for a horse from them) but I doubt that would stop someone who has ill-intentions anyway.

Around 50% of the horses I saw (and I only went through a few pages) were upwards of twenty two/three/four - I presume that those who are complaining about this horse will also be emailing all the horse charities who are willing to pass on their oldies, too?
 

Smurf's Gran

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I have just scanned the WHW website. There are plenty of horses and ponies up for 'rehoming' which are ready to be taken on for as little as £20. Ok, sure; they go out on loan (although I find that a little strange given that someone can pay up to £400 for a horse from them) but I doubt that would stop someone who has ill-intentions anyway.

Around 50% of the horses I saw (and I only went through a few pages) were upwards of twenty two/three/four - I presume that those who are complaining about this horse will also be emailing all the horse charities who are willing to pass on their oldies, too?

I think they have clauses and contracts though, and the horses are checked on a regular basis as per contract, and are recalled to the charity if the contract is broken - I don't think its the same as giving a horse away for free to someone who says all the right things and looks convincing.
 

touchstone

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Just to put it into context, Redwings alone receives more than 100 calls every month about unwanted horses, that is one charity alone.

I'm pretty certain if you contacted all the charities and said you were advertising your horse free to a 'good' home, they would recommend that you didn't and suggest alternatives, (including pts.) Surely with their wealth of experience they can't all be wrong?

As an aside, I've taken in seven rescue cats in total - I would be unable to take in a single rescue horse on a permanent basis. Horses are completely different in care, costs and time expenditure.
 

ILuvCowparsely

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I have just scanned the WHW website. There are plenty of horses and ponies up for 'rehoming' which are ready to be taken on for as little as £20. Ok, sure; they go out on loan (although I find that a little strange given that someone can pay up to £400 for a horse from them) but I doubt that would stop someone who has ill-intentions anyway.

Around 50% of the horses I saw (and I only went through a few pages) were upwards of twenty two/three/four - I presume that those who are complaining about this horse will also be emailing all the horse charities who are willing to pass on their oldies, too?
* 5 well said !!!
 

SpringArising

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I think they have clauses and contracts though, and the horses are checked on a regular basis as per contract, and are recalled to the charity if the contract is broken - I don't think its the same as giving a horse away for free to someone who says all the right things and looks convincing.
Since when has a piece of paper stopped someone? And who's to say that this lady wouldn't be doing regular checks?

I would have thought that charities who are either giving horses away for free or for a minimal fee would be prime target for someone who wants to make a quick buck. Someone could easily say all the right things and look convincing to charities, too.

I think it's so vicious to start a thread about someone else's advert - this is probably the tenth I've seen. How would someone on here feel if they posted an ad and we all scrutinised the hell out of it, whether it be for riding style, choice of bit, weird wording or an inflated price? I can guarantee you it wouldn't feel nice. Selling a horse who you love so much is hard enough as it is and it really can affect some people badly. It sounds like this lady just wants what she thinks is right for her horse, and who's to say what she's doing is wrong? If she thought he was on his last legs then she probably would have had him PTS.
 

ILuvCowparsely

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The point is this lady is not trying to * palm * off to a charity - she is trying to find a home for her old guy to spend his last years, someone who needs a companion or just a horse to love. We live in a society where there are pro's and con's in all things be it animal vegetable or mineral.

This lady has made a decision to try find this old horse a new home....... who are we to sit in Judge Rinders chair and judge her for her choices.

Be it right or wrong:

It is HER decision what she does
It is her choice to vet the home
It is her choice to give him away free
It is her choice not to put a healthy horse down ( his age aside )



What I would say is I would have had a plan in place a long time ago for my horses future ( if I died or had to give them up ) which I have.

I wish this lady luck and hope Eddie finds his new home
 
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touchstone

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If she was doing regular checks, then as she has essentially given the horse away she would have no recourse if she didn't like what she saw. If she was loaning it would be a different matter.
The charity horses are inspected and removed from the loaner if things aren't right, they never relinquish the ownership or responsibility of the animal.

I must admit that I'm not keen on pulling adverts to bits as a rule, but in this case there are real welfare implications that the owner may be unaware of, and if you advertise in the public domain then I'm afraid places like forums are bound to discuss things they notice and not always negatively, it's the way of the internet world.
 

ester

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I was making a comparison which pardon me I am allowed to do am I not. I was merely pointing out that trying to find an old horse a new home in his twilight years due to owners change of circumstances is NO different than a cat been trying to find a new home due to owners not wanting or cannot keep it any more due to financial circumstances.

The owner of this poor horse is and seems to be thinking of the horses future with a new loving owner.
It is VERY different, the cost of funding a horse is huge compared to that of a cat!

I don't think free to good home is anywhere near comparable a charity loan, she will relinquish all rights to make any decisions for the horse.
 
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ester

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I would have him if he was closer :(

I have just signed a years loan contract for a 22 year old 13.1hh pony, that the owner still wants riding and just having time spent on him as she has moved to Spain. I wanted a friend for my horse, anything extra (riding etc) is a bonus to me, and after having him for three months on trail I couldn't imagine not having him. As long as he's happy and my horse is happy I am and as long as his owner is willing to let me keep him he will stay until the end.

I've also rehomed two sister cats :) that where a handful but have come round and I can sleep at night knowing me and OH prevented them both from being PTS.
I do think a 22 yo pony is a long way from a 27 yo TB that doesn't hack though and yours is on loan contract so the owner still gets a say, I would if necessary loan mine out (also 22 and a pony ;) )
 

Smurf's Gran

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The point is this lady is not trying to * palm * off to a charity - she is trying to find a home for her old guy to spend his last years, someone who needs a companion or just a horse to love. We live in a society where there are pro's and con's in all things be it animal vegetable or mineral.

This lady has made a decision to try find this old horse a new home....... who are we to sit in Judge Rinders chair and judge her for her choices.

Be it right or wrong:

It is HER decision what she does
It is her choice to vet the home
It is her choice to give him away free
It is her choice not to put a healthy horse down ( his age aside )



What I would say is I would have had a plan in place a long time ago for my horses future ( if I died or had to give them up ) which I have.

I wish this lady luck and hope Eddie finds his new home
HGA - 12 you are right - all the decisions listed are hers, and as we have freedom of speech in the UK and she has advertised on a public forum we are fully entitled to discuss. I'm glad you have a plan for your horse as we do for ours. But I do think your views are very unrealistic and a touch naive .

As for springarising ands thinking the comments are vicious. I think it is socially healthy - and we are not talking about bits or riding position, we are talking about a horses life. The majority on here are concerned with the welfare of the horse, while the both of you are concerned with upsetting the owner.
 

ILuvCowparsely

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It is VERY different, the cost of funding a horse is huge compared to that of a cat!

I don't think free to good home is anywhere near comparable a charity loan, she will relinquish all rights to make any decisions for the horse.
Well as I said that is HER choice no one else's
 

glamourpuss

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I agree with those that say this is disgusting. This horse is 27! 27! I don't care for the anecdotal stories of horses older than him still pottering around. He is an old man & doesn't deserve the upheaval & stress of leaving everything he knows to start again...even if she does find the perfect home.
 

ILuvCowparsely

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HGA - 12 you are right - all the decisions listed are hers, and as we have freedom of speech in the UK and she has advertised on a public forum we are fully entitled to discuss. I'm glad you have a plan for your horse as we do for ours. But I do think your views are very unrealistic and a touch naive .

As for springarising ands thinking the comments are vicious. I think it is socially healthy - and we are not talking about bits or riding position, we are talking about a horses life. The majority on here are concerned with the welfare of the horse, while the both of you are concerned with upsetting the owner.

Naive LOL what is naive about saying that at the end of the day it is her choice!!!! Yes this sometimes is a biotchy sometimes bullying forum as well as informative and helpful where you can air your views. Going on and on justifying them serves no purpose.

We have heard your view have herd it over and over of shooting this horse being the best option, we don't agree. We!! are not defending this lady we are merely saying it is her choice and leave her now to do what she feels best. Nothing you say here with alter her way of dealing with this situation. Nothing you say will stop this horse being given away.



What have we actually gained from their discussion ??? you along with others feel PTS best option - ok your choice your entitled.

We(me and others) feel she has the right to re home and it is her choice not ours. That is our views what more is there to discuss???

Nothing more to say !!!!
 
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EquiEquestrian556

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The point is this lady is not trying to * palm * off to a charity - she is trying to find a home for her old guy to spend his last years, someone who needs a companion or just a horse to love. We live in a society where there are pro's and con's in all things be it animal vegetable or mineral.

This lady has made a decision to try find this old horse a new home....... who are we to sit in Judge Rinders chair and judge her for her choices.

Be it right or wrong:

It is HER decision what she does
It is her choice to vet the home
It is her choice to give him away free
It is her choice not to put a healthy horse down ( his age aside )



What I would say is I would have had a plan in place a long time ago for my horses future ( if I died or had to give them up ) which I have.

I wish this lady luck and hope Eddie finds his new home
^^ Agree. Yes there are many bad things that could happen, but there are still people out there who will happily look after him, letting him potter around in a nice paddock, being given a feed twice a day, and shelter when the weather is bad (me included). We have taken several oldies who were in need of a home, and they live in a nice big field, have a hard feed 3 times a day, they have rugs and stabling when necessary (as well as any medication they require), are all up to date with all their vaccinations and their feet are trimmed regularly, so good homes do exist. We are happy to see oldies spending their days content and loved, and they provide companionship to the working horses. We've also rehomed horses from rescue centers in the past. There are some that we'd never sell on though, a 36yr Dartmoor Hill Pony, who is very much a pet, and has been abused before we got her, and as a result is nervous around new people. There are two 24 year olds, one has Cushings & EMS and is very special to us, the other has wind galls on both her back legs, plus arthritis, and is only field sound, as well as having multiple melanomas.

If however the horse was healthy and sound (as this horse seems), I would consider selling it. If the home & owner are vetted, then I would be relatively happy with selling it. What happens to fit & healthy young horses that are sold? The home that you sell them to may be OK, but you don't get to choose what happens to them a few years later when they're older.

There are some horrid homes out there, but equally as many loving homes that are willing to care for the horse's every need, and I don't think it's fair to judge people on what they choose to do with their horse.
 

Smurf's Gran

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^^ Agree. Yes there are many bad things that could happen, but there are still people out there who will happily look after him, letting him potter around in a nice paddock, being given a feed twice a day, and shelter when the weather is bad (me included). We have taken several oldies who were in need of a home, and they live in a nice big field, have a hard feed 3 times a day, they have rugs and stabling when necessary (as well as any medication they require), are all up to date with all their vaccinations and their feet are trimmed regularly, so good homes do exist. We are happy to see oldies spending their days content and loved, and they provide companionship to the working horses. We've also rehomed horses from rescue centers in the past. There are some that we'd never sell on though, a 36yr Dartmoor Hill Pony, who is very much a pet, and has been abused before we got her, and as a result is nervous around new people. There are two 24 year olds, one has Cushings & EMS and is very special to us, the other has wind galls on both her back legs, plus arthritis, and is only field sound, as well as having multiple melanomas.

If however the horse was healthy and sound (as this horse seems), I would consider selling it. If the home & owner are vetted, then I would be relatively happy with selling it. What happens to fit & healthy young horses that are sold? The home that you sell them to may be OK, but you don't get to choose what happens to them a few years later when they're older.

There are some horrid homes out there, but equally as many loving homes that are willing to care for the horse's every need, and I don't think it's fair to judge people on what they choose to do with their horse.
EE it would be great if you could have him. Unfortunately while there might be a happy ending, and if you are fit, young with potential (horse) your chances are significantly better that if you are 27 and a retired TB, who needs a field shelter at the very least, then I would say the chance of a good home are slim at best .
 
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