ADVICE NEEDED: Spare stable for a retirement livery (horse/pony)

GREYSMEADOW

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Since having my old horse pts back in January due to illness, I have a spare stable and have been considering having a paying retirement livery from May to Mid October (perhaps even longer term) mainly for company for my 8yo (I also have an aged Shetland – both geldings).
My problem is that I don’t have full winter turnout because the ground gets so very waterlogged/wrecked and because of this I tend to turnout for a few hours at the week-ends.
My old horse didn’t actually like being out for too long (as he got older) but now would like my 8yo to be out longer in the winter months when the ground is ok if I choose to have a retirement livery all year round.

The yard has no mains electricity – there are lights in the wooden stables/feed room which is run off by a car battery. I do use a good head torch though.
There is no mains water, but I have a water bowser which I fill up from home and then tow to the yard.

Other facts are:
11ft x 12ft stable, with or without rubber matting
Feed room, barn and outbuildings for hay/shavings storage
Separate yard turnout, the stable doors are never closed (even when it snows) so horses have 24/7 access.
Summer months: horses have their own driveways from their stables which is electric taped off into their separate paddocks. This system works very well.
Paddocks are a mix of mainly hedging, post and rail fencing (in the process of doing some repairs as an oak tree came down) and electric fencing for strip type/managed grazing.
There is approx. 6 acres – 2 paddocks for summer and 2 paddocks for winter. Sometimes if we run out of summer grazing then we extent over to the winter paddocks but not for long.
Just wondered if this would be of interest to anyone and what price would you expect to pay. I do the horses am and YO does them afternoon time and I check them after work/early evening. I probably wouldn’t do DIY retirement livery as I would want all horses to be fed/watered at the same time. The YO wouldn’t want the livery’s whole family visiting all the time either, so it would just suit a non smoking adult. No children and no dogs either as I wouldn’t want them to get hurt etc. My 8yo can be a bit playful and naughty!
So that may lead to insurance/liability coverage. Do I need this or make sure that the livery person has public liability insurance, horse insurance/liabiliity and sign some sort of waiver so that they have no claim on me or YO if there is an accident/incident.
The property is not insured.
Was thinking on part or almost full retirement livery. What would you pay and expect for this service.
Don’t really want to provide hay but owner could get their own. I have a number of suppliers I use.
The smallholding is on a quiet country lane and is fairly secluded with one public footpath running through one winter paddock.
Thanks for reading and look forward to your comments and advice.
 

eggs

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I'm sorry but that setup wouldn't interest me. I think most people who want retirement livery would want their horse to have maximum turnout.
 

be positive

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You either need to offer full retirement livery where you provide hay, bedding and feed, it really needs to be long term as retired horses want stability not moving to and fro, or you are just offering a short term part livery, it doesn't sound like the ideal set up for many people and without hay being provided think you can only charge a bit more than you would for a DIY.

I am also unsure whether an older horse will want to be out with a playful, naughty 8 year old most want peace and quiet, I just read again and see it would be individual turnout which would be a definite no from me as even with one over the fence it is not good enough for an oldie to be isolated even if they want to be peaceful they need company with them, my old boy would hate to be kept on his own all the time, even though he seems ok it prevents proper interaction.
 

Zipzop

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There are quite a few negative points for this set up, however saying that, the fact that they are never shut in their stables would interest me. As the owner of a sec d if he ever needed retirement livery I just could not simply turn him out he would end up obese and then all the relative problems would ensue. So for someone with a similar horse or a lami horse this may well be a great option. The individual bit though, would be a problem.
 

GREYSMEADOW

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Many thanks for your comments.

I have done this separate access turnout with different horses for over 25 years now and it has avoided injury ie. kicks, cuts and strains etc. and have avoided making any claims on the horse insurance.

Summer time, horses can easily touch and groom each other as they are only separated by the electric fence. They both go though the main gateway and my 8yo is routed to the top end of the paddock to route to the side paddock whilst the livery would stay in the main paddock which is also shared and separated with the aged Shetland who has access (from the back) from his stable from his own pathway into his very small paddock (he has limited eyesight and a lami). The shetland gets shut in at nights.

Winter time the bottom fields would be used and I just have a double electric fence to separate them but they would be both in the same field. The Shetland says near to his stable at the top. My neighbour turns her 3 horses out in the field next door too.

The number of friends who pop by and say that it’s such a great set up and would love to move in, but I just don’t have the space for a number of liveries.
I have had my neighbours equine students come over and they have said how great the set up is, and even the vets as it minimises injury.

The only reason why I didn’t want to provide hay to a livery is that if their horse starts coughing I don’t want to be blamed for providing hay which is possibly making their horse cough. I can get a quantity of hay for the livery though.

My 8yo is a bit of a character and likes to canter out/into the yard at times when he has summer turnout! He seems to do this when a human is on the yard. His stable manners are not great but we are working on that.

A retired horse/pony doesn’t have to be aged. Maybe retired due to injury etc.
 

catroo

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That's a very specific type of livery you are offering, not saying you wouldn't get any takers but it would be a small pool, especially if you only want someone in the summer months.

Sounds like you're subletting the yard? If you are running a business (ie livery) then you should have insurance and declare the income as part of earnings.

Price wise, no hay, electric and the quirks does limit the price. I could get full traditional retirement livery for £250 a month so it would be a lot less than this.
 

catroo

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I get why you you've structured it for individual turnout but for many people proper company is more important.

It would probably suit a college student brining horse home for holidays if you know of any
 

GREYSMEADOW

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I/YO have actually been asked for retirement livery last year when there was no empty stable and was asked by someone else only last month. I am lucky enough that I don't pay for any livery, just pay for repairs etc, hedging cut, manure removal, new fencing, new roof for stables etc. when needed.
DIY Grass livery around here is £20 pw and DIY grass + stable is £25 pw.
 
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