Advise on pony I sold

Horse1979

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Looking for advise: I sold a pony who is a little schoolmaster. He is easy to do, good in all activities. I had him to get my daughters confidence back which he did well. Sold him two weeks ago, day after he went to his home I got a call to say he has heat in a back leg. They got the vet out who said he couldn't find anything which was good but they could get a scan of they wanted. So they did. Scan came back perfect. So vet advised give him a week off. They have now been riding for a few days and I get an email and call to say pony won't jump a jump so want to bring him back. I asked has he done anything else wrong and was told no. He just comes to a slow stop on the approach to the jump. No sorry stops. No running out. Just a gradual stop. They said it will knock the daughters confidence so either want a alotnofnthete money back he will keep him or return him. This seems unreasonable. He was sold! Not on trial, or loan. He is a cracking pony but I don't have the money to rerun for a start but also know that the poor pony wasn't ridden for the first week, and now won't jump. Maybe they should do trotting poles to get him used to his new rider and home??
What should I do?
 

FestiveFuzz

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Did they get him vetted before they bought him?

Assuming it's a private sale (which it sounds like it was) you're under no obligation to take him back. Are you able to offer to visit and help them through the jumping issue perhaps?
 

Horse1979

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No they didn't have him vetted. But as they got there vet out and the scan was clear they are happy with that but not the jumping! They rode him for an hour when they tried him, saw my daughter jump him about 15 jumps, and then on a windy rainy day asked my daughter to gallop from bottom of field up to the gate as fast as she could- and when they shout stop my daughter was to pull him to a stop! Which she did for hem , twice! Pony never puts a foot wrong! They brought him that day and he went to there home two days later. Legally where do I stand? He is a very honest, hard to find pony but I can't have him back as gave up his stable at the yard and can't reimburse them- but don't see why I should. It's was a sale not a loan.
I fear lack of knowledge in this case is a terrible thing! Surely a pony that's not bolting into the jump, one she will need to ride whilst they get to know each other is surely the perfect pony?? Boo hoo 😢
 

gothdolly

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Coming to a slow stop sounds like the pony thinks that the rider does not really want to jump, and isn't sure what to do. It sounds like he is trying to look after her! My son's pony does this sometimes, if he is being ineffectual, and I think its because he is confused rather than naughty and can tell that my son does not really want to jump! I feel sorry for you and the pony.
 

Horse1979

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I don't want my daughter to get upset going over to ride him which is about an hour away, plus I work full time. Surely they need an instructor to get the partnership formed between there daughter and a new pony?? X
 

FestiveFuzz

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Legally it's a private sale and he's sold as seen so no you don't have to take him back or refund them, though where that leaves the poor pony in all of this is anyone's guess.

Going steady into a jump is one thing, but the horse slowing to a stop before the jump certainly won't be encouraging. Did they jump him before they bought him?
 

Horse1979

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Yes, they watched my daughter jump him about 15 jumps, and then there daughter who had only ever done x poles, but that day on him she jumped about 65cm straight! He was out SJ the week before we sold him and was placed in both classes - just don't understand!
 

FestiveFuzz

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It sounds like he's lacking confidence. I agree that long term they'd be best placed to get an instructor to help but in your shoes as the seller and previous owner I would want to see first hand what's going on and try to help them where I can as I suspect washing your hands of them will only make them more adamant they want a refund.
 

be positive

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I have sold loads of ponies over the years and one or two people have contacted me to say something is not so perfect, I always respond by telling them to give it a bit longer, have a few lessons and let the child get to know the pony, pony get to know the child, usually within a couple of weeks they are settled down and everything works out fine, if you know the pony is genuine do the same as me tell them he needs longer to settle, that they need to give it more time before expecting a nervous child to be jumping, they are being unreasonable expecting too much too soon but be tactful in how you put it.

I did have one where they phoned and told me it had to come back, I gave them a few tips and said see how it goes and two weeks later got back to them to see how it was going as I had someone else really interested, the response was "he is not for sale even for a million £'s " they had really found the key to him and he had settled with them.
 

zoelouisem

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I was in your shoes 2 1/2 years ago I sold my daughters perfect PC pony.
She had won everything with her.
Sold her on to some lovely people 3/4 days later new owner rang to ask me to take her back she was apparently been naughty! She was never naughty.
I just said money had already been spent on new pony that she had been a super star for us and new ponies may try and test a new jockey in a new home to stick with her they wouldn't regret it.
2 weeks later saw a fb the was winning at a show. I've since stayed In touch the kids have won loads learnt so much. They've now outgrown her and I've just helped them find a new home for her to teach another kid!
Be firm if you know the ponies good he's probably just testing the new rider!
 

Horse1979

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Thanks for your advise! Bearing in mind he wasn't ridden for just over a week so have only been able to ride a couple of times I think you are right and it's too soon for a nervous child to jump a new pony. It's very frustrating as I know he is 1000% and has done wonders for my daughter. I will compose an email tomorrow and say that they need to take it slowly, get some lessons etc.... Fingers crossed x
 

Goldenstar

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Even the best pony needs a rider sounds like it's lessons that are needed .
That said I would never leave a much loved pony in a bad situation .
If you don't want your daughter upset say so but I think you should go over yourself
 

zoelouisem

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Thanks for your advise! Bearing in mind he wasn't ridden for just over a week so have only been able to ride a couple of times I think you are right and it's too soon for a nervous child to jump a new pony. It's very frustrating as I know he is 1000% and has done wonders for my daughter. I will compose an email tomorrow and say that they need to take it slowly, get some lessons etc.... Fingers crossed x

If he's had a week off why would they jump him anyway silly people.
The people I had contact me left there kids riding without supervision 2 days after buying her and wondered why they were having problems. It worked out well in the end though sure your pony will too. Just takes time.
 

Horse1979

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Glad your story had a happy ending- ponies will always try their luck I guess in new home- same as kids! He is such a kind pony he wouldn't do anything to upset anyone- I've had complete beginners on him and very experienced children and he is always a gentleman x
 

rachk89

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Given that he had a bad leg how do they know it's not that causing him problems still even slightly and that's what is causing him to not jump?

Think they need to be realistic and allow him to get better. No jumping for a while he is an animal not a machine.
 

Horse1979

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I fully agree, realistically there ridden him for 3 days and aren't happy! I know from previous ponies that's we've had they all try it on and I'm glad it's by gradually slowing down rather than bombing off!!! I agree, at first they were saying he had leg issue as it was hot- that then was all sorted even though he was open to vet they didn't have him vetted! But to expect a pony to jump when he has just had a week off I think is very silly he is only a little 12hh pony so even a x like to him isn't small.
He was not sold on a trial basis or a loan basis , but just sold! I've had issues with a pony I brought once and never contacted previous owner and demanded money back etc as it was my decision to buy it and we then found and instructor that worked with them bonding and being in charge of her pony. X
 

Pinkvboots

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If the daughter has only really done poles she is probably not riding him into the jump like your daughter did, his in a new home had a week off he is probably feeling a bit lost himself, I would suggest that she has some lessons as even the best ponies need to be ridden properly and still need confidence from the rider I think it's a bit soon for them to be throwing in the towel they have not really given it a chance to work.
 

Horse1979

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I've replied to their email suggesting taking it slow with him as he had a week off and allowing the daughter and pony to bond on flat work with an instructor for a few weeks before picking him to pieces. He is an ex riding school pony before we had him so he is a real trusted sort.
So frustrating that people don't realise they are ponies and not robotic machines x
 

AdorableAlice

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Coming to a slow stop sounds like the pony thinks that the rider does not really want to jump, and isn't sure what to do. It sounds like he is trying to look after her! My son's pony does this sometimes, if he is being ineffectual, and I think its because he is confused rather than naughty and can tell that my son does not really want to jump! I feel sorry for you and the pony.

This in spades.

I had a hunter who did exactly the same when I got too ambitious and sat there like a muppet when I realised the hedge was bigger than I thought. He would gallop at the fence until he felt me think oh xxxx that's big and then gently stop remaining in a straight line so I didn't topple off the side. Loved that horse !

Sold as seen and tried OP, they need lessons and time to adapt to one another.
 

rachk89

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I've replied to their email suggesting taking it slow with him as he had a week off and allowing the daughter and pony to bond on flat work with an instructor for a few weeks before picking him to pieces. He is an ex riding school pony before we had him so he is a real trusted sort.
So frustrating that people don't realise they are ponies and not robotic machines x

That is just kids really. Kids want to go fast and jump lots and often don't think about flat work. I have so far only seen one teenager not like that.

Hope the pony goes better for them eventually. I agree with others too that he is probably doing it deliberately as the kid isn't as confident as your daughter but i do also think the leg is probably still an issue. We wouldn't give ourselves a week off from a sprained ankle and expect to be able to do high jump immediately afterwards. Same principle for the pony.
 

Boulty

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Sounds like the new rider is maybe not as confident over fences as your daughter and isn't giving the pony clear signals that she does in fact want to jump / she may be leaning forwards and taking her leg off or catching the pony in the mouth. I'd agree that they need to seek the help of an instructor to assess what's going on and that really if the new rider is not very experienced over fences then initially jumping should only be taking place under instruction anyway tbh until they're happy with each other and the new owners really should have anticipated the need for ongoing lessons. Even if they had been riding regularly 2 weeks is no time at all to build any sort of partnership. At the end of the day the pony is sold and I don't think they really have any come back as pony is not doing anything dangerous. You could go for a look at the behaviour (by yourself sans daughter) to see what exactly is going on and if it IS just a communication issues / teething problems as a goodwill gesture if you wished but they still can't try to make you take him back and if they decide that they don't want to keep him for whatever reason then re-advertsing / reselling would be their job. Only exception to this would be if they had him on a trial period at all but from what you said I'm assuming no.
 

JanetGeorge

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The fact that they want a big discount OR a return suggests to me they're trying it on. I had one come back within a week as new owner totally lacked nerve and horse took advantage. THEY got a full refund. One other went lame after an active YEAR - I took her back at a considerable drop in the selling price! They grabbed it rather than pay a vet - but they had totally wrecked her back! She will be a brood mare - after I spent a lot of money on scans and physio - but at least she's suitably graded.

If they persist, I'd offer to take the pony back at a considerably reduced price - watch them run!
 

Dubsie

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If they sent you a video, I'll bet you'll see the rider fail to kick on to the jump/hesitate. You can stand and watch a showjumping competition and know which rider is going to get a refusal before the pony stops! Am sure that's what you'll see on a video if you ask for one. Really not your problem but understand you care, so suggest say that they should see how rider is with an instructor as it sounds like may be a bit soon to start jumping and maybe progress with flatwork for now. Doesn't even sound like the pony is trying it on!
 

Horse1979

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Thsnks everyone. Reading all your replies reassures me that I think they are expecting far too much of the pony and need to get lessons. And as far as his leg goes- surely they should take this week a little bit steady! The pony was 100% when he went to them and when they tried him so god knows what had happened to his leg the day after he went to them. I've kept in contact with them but now wish to only via email so I have back up. I think they have over estimated the daughters riding level and are not being realistic in her ability at this stage perhaps. The pony is superb and will teach her lots, but like any pony needs to be ridden. When they came to try him she asked me if the pony has ever stopped at a jump , my reply: absolutely! He is a pony! A few times my daughter has been lazy and he has thought oh I'll just stop- but once my daughter brings him into jump again and let's him know he is going over he does and won't do it again! They galloped this pony with my daughter on flat out in the field and he was super as normal, they definitely put him through his paces for sure! Very frustrating as I gave up my stable so couldn't have him back even if I wanted to! They also said they have put there younger daughter on him on lead and he has been fab!!
I think they are just expecting far too much too soon and are forgetting he is an animal not a robot.
 

Sandstone1

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I'd not be happy leaving him there if it was me. If they are jumping him a few days after there was heat in his leg they don't care about him much.
 

Pedantic

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I'd not be happy leaving him there if it was me. If they are jumping him a few days after there was heat in his leg they don't care about him much.

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They sound like ashooooooooooooooooooooooooles
 

FfionWinnie

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Daughter's saintly pony will do this sometimes with her but not a more experienced rider and not when she's got the engine running properly. It's hardly something to worry about. They should get an instructor to help them with the pony right away. Do the parents ride or have a clue. Sounds like they don't.
 

Horse1979

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They are pushing for me to have pony back or a lot of there money back! I've given up the stable so can't have him back as the yard owner got s new horse and has that stable now. The parents ride but think more for hacking than anything. They have had two previous ponies who dump the children apparently so maybe why they are worried if he is slowly stopping but she said they haven't come off him as its a gradual stop. The grandma is very pushy and is demanding money back or return! Very forceful character. They way I see it us they tried him for an hour galloped him took videos photos etc, he was open to vet but they didn't bother.day after he goes there he has heat In leg yet was 10000% fine when delivered and they raised no concern. But now just won't jump. She did say he has gone over the jumps second attempt but as not the first will knock daughters confidence
 

FfionWinnie

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Unless he is whip shy I would suggest they gently encourage him forwards until the child gets more confidence and keep the jumps so small that they do just walk over them if he grinds to a halt rather than letting him turn away. I hate to say but they do sound like muppets
 
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