anyone 'lost' their 15.2 bay tb?

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Bit melodramitic ! It's the middle of winter, here it's done nothing but rain for days and days. The rspca said it had water lying in the field and the OP said the horse was in reasonable condition. Hardly likely to drop down dead shortly .....
Ah didnt see the bit about water lying in the field.... well maybe I will assume this is the J-Lo's of horses that will only drink Volvic and the thought of standing in a water logged field just disgusts and appals it... ;) or maybe it will drown in the water.... maybe it cant swim.... arm bands, I think arm bands are going to be needed.. plus alluminium shoes will mean it lacks the extra weight of shoes and may get blown away.... Definite neglect case :p

In all seriousness, probably ought to keep an eye on it and see if its microchipped. Therefore lies my godly and final decision :cool:

Its late I have been writing an essay all day... It has been one of those days when I needed to ride and relax.. :mad:
 

shadowboy

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Despite having water puddles in field I would expect any cared for horse to have proper access. What happens after puddles drain away... it was actually the fact it was caught in its slipped rug that alerted us on the yard. That was 3 weeks ago. Definitely racing plates, I've seen them before. Very very thin. RSCPA said they wouldn't do anything unless we could prove there was no water for 48 hours then it would be acceptable to consider it neglect. I have assumed it is a tb as it is very fine and narrow. It could be a standardbred?
 

shadowboy

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Vet very thin relates to the plates since 3 weeks ago no one has taken its rug off to check condition. Only to re right the rug daily.
 

FionaM12

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Despite having water puddles in field I would expect any cared for horse to have proper access. What happens after puddles drain away... it was actually the fact it was caught in its slipped rug that alerted us on the yard. That was 3 weeks ago. Definitely racing plates, I've seen them before. Very very thin. RSCPA said they wouldn't do anything unless we could prove there was no water for 48 hours then it would be acceptable to consider it neglect. I have assumed it is a tb as it is very fine and narrow. It could be a standardbred?
I think you're right to keep an eye on it. I agree that in the long term puddles aren't a reliable water source. The racing plates are baffling, aren't they?

I hope you find someone with a scanner and get to the bottom of this. Bless you for looking out for the poor lad.
 

legaldancer

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While I know next to nothing about trotters, I do know that they usually are not cobby and are mostly Standardbreds which do resemble a TB.

Also, if it does belong to gypsies they are quite able to have it properly shod with racing plates even though pricey - they are not poor! My farrier is of Romany descent and shoes to a high standard and is on the Worshipful Farriers list.

I think there is quite a lot of money involved in trotting, ie betting etc, so worthwhile having it shod with racing plates. Maybe it's a "Flapper" (race horse but not raced under rules).
 

PeterNatt

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Contact the British Horse Society (BHS) Welfare Department on 02476 840500 or World Horse Welfare (WHW) on 08000 480 180.

They will be able to determine the micro-chip number and then check with the www.nedonline.co.uk data base for the details of the current recoded owner. If the current recorded owner is not the curent owner then it will require further investigation and possibly action taken by Trading Standards.

A horse without a fresh supply of water is a Welfare case and the RSPCA should have taken immediate action and sent one of their officers out.
 
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Generally on a hill.. when not blown off the side.
While I know next to nothing about trotters, I do know that they usually are not cobby and are mostly Standardbreds which do resemble a TB.

Also, if it does belong to gypsies they are quite able to have it properly shod with racing plates even though pricey - they are not poor! My farrier is of Romany descent and shoes to a high standard and is on the Worshipful Farriers list.

I think there is quite a lot of money involved in trotting, ie betting etc, so worthwhile having it shod with racing plates. Maybe it's a "Flapper" (race horse but not raced under rules).
ah.. learn something new :) I have very little/no knowledge on gypsys and their goings on, other than when they steal stuff or dump horses in trailers in the dykes of the fens.

Someone tried to sell me a supposed trotter that was TBxcob type.. not cobby.. but that was just the breeding, so without taking too much interest in the trotting side I guessed that was just the general breeding of them.
 

scrunchie

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ah.. learn something new :) I have very little/no knowledge on gypsys and their goings on, other than when they steal stuff or dump horses in trailers in the dykes of the fens.

Someone tried to sell me a supposed trotter that was TBxcob type.. not cobby.. but that was just the breeding, so without taking too much interest in the trotting side I guessed that was just the general breeding of them.
Their trotters tend to be standardbred x tb x cob. They like a bit of cob in the breeding to make them more hardy as most live out.

Dooney came from a trotter home. We think he's standardbred x tb because he's far too lanky to have any cob in him.
 

fatpiggy

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Round our way there is a gypsy owner who just sticks his trotters (family group including foals, in-foal mares and a stallion) on land which is owned by a major company I believe when he wants a bit of free grazing. He just breaks the fence down and sticks them in. I found this out when I stopped on my way to work to catch 5 loose horses on the road. They had clearly been stabled beforehand though as the poo piles revealed. They were in good order, but unrugged and some were shivering very badly. I've seen them in the same field again several times since. The police knew who owned the horses! As for having no water, just a puddle - my old girl goes out of her way to drink from puddles in the field in the winter despite the "deposits" in them, rather than the nice clean mains water in the troughs. I assume their sensititive taste buds find the chlorine unpalatable.
 

Tammytoo

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Poor horse! Forget the RSPCA - they're as much use as a chocolate fireguard. BHS Welfare or ILPH are much better. Do you have a local dog warden? If so I'm sure he will have a chip-reading thingy which he could use to read for a chip?

The Council certainly do have a duty of care and it's worth reminding them of the fact.

Just to add - not all trotters belong to Gypsies, who use them primarily for road racing. There are proper harness racing tracks and organised meetings for the sport. Generally standardbreds are the preferred breed and it is usualy pacing rather than square trotting. Lots of these horses are kept on proper yards and well looked after. No, I don't have trotters, but I know a man who does!
 
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shadowboy

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Just had a text from the owner! Ha detective work sorted. it is owner (I was shocked to find out) by a 'normal' horse owner i.e. not a travellers trotter or stolen racehorse. It is apparently a TB bought from a racing yard recently. Owner apprantly didnt know that there was no water trough in the field!!!

Anyway, mystery solved, thanks for all the input guys. Not sure if it is good or bad but it is owned and apparently will have 'proper' water by tonight.
 
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