Argh, really need people's suggestions

dwi

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D has come so far this winter and I was really looking forward to the first dressage test of the year but I cannot get her to settle without her fly mask on. With a fly mask on she settles down and works nicely onto the contact, without she shakes, fusses and worries. I tried drenching her in fly spray tonight and it didn't make any difference. She can't wear ear covers because she doesn't like them and shakes them off.

RI has suggested that I might have to ask if they will let her wear a fly mask and accept a penalty.

Any ideas? Feeling like selling D at the moment, we've come so far but no-one is ever going to see that if we can't sort it out.
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LittleSoph

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I'd definately see ifthey'll allow you to compete with the mask on. At least you'll be able to do it! Better than nothing perhaps?
Then you can keep working on the issue, but be able to get her out and about meanwhile.
 

Cliqmo

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Can you buy an ear cover (like the showjumpers wear) in a fine gauze material (the the nose nets for headshakers) that would seem to be ideal
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dwi

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[ QUOTE ]
Can she wear a fly hat?

[/ QUOTE ]

No, she hates them more than flies. She onc shook her head so hard when I put her fly hat on that her bridle fell off as we were about to cross a major road. I wouldn't have thought that a bridle could be shaken off but she proved me wrong
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dwi

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[ QUOTE ]
Can you buy an ear cover (like the showjumpers wear) in a fine gauze material (the the nose nets for headshakers) that would seem to be ideal
smile.gif


[/ QUOTE ]

I wonder if I could cut the face off my friend's one and then just sew the ear pieces on to her show bridle?

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pottamus

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My suggestion would be not to bother doing the stupid dressage if the narrow minded pompuss idiot judges mark you down in some way for ensuring your horse is comfortable doing its work!!! Good god what has the industry come to when we are not allowed to perform our sport in comfort without it not 'being the thing to be seen in'!!!
 

dwi

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[ QUOTE ]
My suggestion would be not to bother doing the stupid dressage if the narrow minded pompuss idiot judges mark you down in some way for ensuring your horse is comfortable doing its work!!! Good god what has the industry come to when we are not allowed to perform our sport in comfort without it not 'being the thing to be seen in'!!!

[/ QUOTE ]

I kind of feel that way myself but unfortunately they don't give rosettes for being a safe hack. I know its shallow but just once I would like her to get a decent placing to recognise how special she is. I much prefer endurance but I just can't get her fast enough to make the minimum speed so we're stuck as pleasure riders rather than competitive.

I'd like to think they'd let me wear it because its about comfort not control like a stronger bit or something but I don't think they're going to see it like that.
 

Walrus

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Have you thought about le trec? I know nothing about it but if you want to compete and get out and about in an endurency type way it seems that type of thing maybe? Maybe they would let you wear a fly mask?
 

dwi

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[ QUOTE ]
Have you thought about le trec? I know nothing about it but if you want to compete and get out and about in an endurency type way it seems that type of thing maybe? Maybe they would let you wear a fly mask?

[/ QUOTE ]

I'd quite like to do trec but there don't seem to be any nearby. That and we'd have to skip the section where you leave your horse standing and then go back to them. I would have no chance of catching Daisy once I'd let go of her in a field of grass, she'd think it was Christmas
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paintsplat05

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Endurance wise the horse I ride did a couple of 32kms at only half fitness and we got 2 grade 4s, and he's not a speedy arab, he's a Connie who finds endurance quiet boring after the first hour! Also most rides now do Novice rides of 20kms, depends on the ride though.
 

bex1984

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are you looking at doing unaff. dressage? I'd defo get in touch with the organisers and see what they say - particularly if there's any way you could get a letter from your vet to say she really needs to wear it. TBH some low key local dressage places probably won't be that bothered if you explain this situation.

If all else fails, I'm sure you can find a different competition to do this summer (BTW nearest TREC to us is this one I think: http://www.white-horse-trec.co.uk/ or how about some in hand showing??), and then do winter indoor dressage?

Is it defo the flies, or could it be pollen?
 

Tnavas

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Some suggestions -

Has the vet checked her ears for any mites, wax etc?

Have you had a chiro check her back and especially her poll?

Do you use a flash noseband - if so try removing the flash strap.

If being hard fed put her ono the basics and remove all Soya and bean products.

There is also and eye drop that is helping a lot of head shakers -

Eye treatment found to help headshaking

January 28, 2009

Allergic conditions may be behind some cases of headshaking in horses, research suggests.
Headshaking is an irritating and frustrating problem for the rider and is an indication that the horse is suffering pain and discomfort.

The problem is often worse in the summer. Numerous causes have been identified, making it a challenging condition to investigate.

Occasionally a physical abnormality affecting the sinuses, teeth or ears may be detected. Often no physical abnormality can be found. Many cases are thought to be the result of pain in the trigeminal nerve that innervates the nose and face.

Various treatments have been used, with inconsistent results.

A report by Dr Catherine Stalin and others in the Veterinary Record suggests an allergic condition is involved in at least some cases.

The researchers described three cases of seasonal headshaking that responded to treatment with sodium cromoglycate drops.

The three horses were so severely affected that they could not be ridden. Headshaking started, or grew worse, when the horses brought in to the light from a dark stable. All horses showed signs of excessive tear production and photophobia.

Sodium cromoglycate eye drops were successful in relieving the condition, where previous treatments, including corticosteroids (dexamethasone), had not.

One horse had suffered seasonal headshaking for the previous two years. Within a few minutes of starting treatment with sodium cromoglycate eye drops it stopped headshaking and could be ridden.

Sodium cromoglycate acts by stabilising mast cells, preventing them releasing histamine as part of the allergic response.

The response to treatment suggests that in these cases the cause of the headshaking was an allergic conjunctivitis.

It was, however, interesting that there had been no response to dexamethasone which might have been expected to relieve signs of allergy. Perhaps, the authors suggested, this was more than a purely allergic condition, or maybe cromoglycate has other modes of action that are not yet understood.


Treatment of seasonal headshaking in three horses with sodium cromoglycate eye drops. CE Stalin, IP Boydell, RE Pike.
Veterinary Record (2008) 163, 305 -306
Equine Science Update
 
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