At what point do you stop riding?

NooNoo59

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At a bit of crossroads current cob is undergoing diagnosis for lameness and not sure he is going to come right. I took this horse on as I could see his potential he was a gift so I have worked very hard to get him ready to compete at dressage but he's gone wrong. So here's the thing I have just been looking around at what a available for sale. I just want to be able to hack out and do a prelim test. I have a good friend who is a very reputable dealer and I went there today to look at a young cob he was very laid back but green in the school. Why do I feel that at 59 I can't cope with what I think will be s very sweet little horse. I get so frustrated with myself I am not a bad rider have a great instructor give my horses the best care I can. Why am I hesitating, is 59 too old to take on a safe youngster?
 

equi

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Why do you want to take on a youngster? If what you want to do is hack and prelim safely..why does it need to be a horse that you have to train to do that?
 

w1bbler

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Friend of mine, no great rider took on a 4yr old at 70, has lots of support to stay on the right path. Has not regretted it, 3 yrs later has a fab horse, that will be very saleable should they decide to stop riding.
I'd go for the young cob, if you feel you have the experience & support to bring on. Temperament is everything, schooling is part of the fun of ownership
 

Polos Mum

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I wouldn't buy a youngster if that's not what you want. I would hang on for a horse that is doing what you want now. We are coming to the end of the summer and more horses will be coming onto the market.
If budget is a consideration then given what you have said in your initial post I would look at something older rather than something younger (they seem to have just as much chance of going wrong - sadly!)
Something a touch older but established that needs to step down a bit to do hacking and prelim dressage might be perfect for you.
 

NooNoo59

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I do enjoy the schooling part of things and like the pleasure of improving a horse. Just questioning my own ability this young horse will be very well started as the dealer is a very good sympathetic rider and very trustworthy. I have been horse shopping with people a lot and it has made me very cynical. Lots to think about!
 

EllenJay

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Age is just a number - both yours and the horse. If you feel that he is the right one for you, go for it. Age isn't a barometer for temperament and even older horse sometimes are very green in their schooling.
 

NooNoo59

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Yes that's my thoughts he seems like a lovely boy and age is just z number but try telling that to me knees and hips first thing in the morning haha!!
 

maya2008

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A long time ago I took a gamble on a just turned 4 year old with a wonderful temperament. Not at all what I had been looking for, but after months of seeing unsuitable/lame horses, something safe and sweet was my priority! I have never regretted it. She has been the best horse I could ever have had, my very best friend and one I can always rely on.

Temperament is everything, age is just a number!
 
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