• REMINDER

    Any content, information, or advice found on social media platforms and the wider Internet, including forums such as HHO, should NOT be acted upon unless checked against a reliable, authoritative source, and re-checked, particularly where personal health is at stake. Seek professional advice/confirmation before acting on such at all times.

Best Hoof Boots for P?

Rosemary28

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 July 2012
Messages
627
Location
Cheshire
P is always a little sore after a trim, he's a sensitive soul (no pun intended) and I find he struggles on stony ground. Unfortunately the track to the yard is stony and can't be avoided if we want to go out.

I'm debating trying him with hoof boots, but wondering if anyone has any recommendations for the best ones? I've never used them before.
 

Pinkvboots

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 August 2010
Messages
10,819
Location
Hertfordshire
How is the farrier trimming his feet?

Thing is a lot of them will par back the frog and over trim the wall and heals for a barefoot horse.

My farrier knows not to cut back my horses frogs and he doesn't take too much off everywhere else, you need to just talk to your farrier and say what you want doing.
 

Rosemary28

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 July 2012
Messages
627
Location
Cheshire
Please feel free to tell me if there is something glaringly wrong, I am inexperienced and always happy to learn!
 

be positive

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 July 2011
Messages
19,155
To me it looks as if you need to address the deep cleft in his frog, it should not be like that in a properly functioning foot and when bare it is even more important, I am not sure it is due to the trim as much as the diet that is causing the feet to show discomfort, the very boxy feet with deep clefts and poor frog are signs that the foot is not functioning as well as it should be.

What are you feeding him?

Just to add it looks as if he is landing toe first.
 

Rosemary28

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 July 2012
Messages
627
Location
Cheshire
He basically gets grass and not much else, he is prone to lami and a really good doer so I have to be really careful about what he eats. What would you recommend feeding him?
 

be positive

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 July 2011
Messages
19,155
I am not an expert but suspect he is lacking some essential vits/ mins due to being restricted because of the laminitis risk, the problem is that if the foot is not at it's best it can be a vicious circle, they stop using it properly, the frog is not doing the job it should so they land toe first to avoid the discomfort in the heel so it never gets better and functions as it should, then even a tiny trim will make him sore, it shouldn't if the foot is working properly but as it isn't it will make him worse.

I would suggest Equimins advanced complete, often recommended as it has a good spec for a reasonable price, introduce it gradually in a tiny amount of something low sugar/ starch to carry it and set about treating the frogs at the same time, Red horse products work well but even just scrubbing the frog with salt water can help, it depends whether there is any thrush in there to get rid of.

I would probably get boots to use if you have to go onto a stony track as it will not help him improve if he is landing toe first and reluctant to land on the heels so booting will allow you to exercise him and keep his weight down, then he can maybe do a bit without them on a surface or grass, one here goes out with boots on but her owner takes them off for the second part of the ride so she has some time on tarmac without them, bit of a faff but the boots are easy to pop on and off, she has Scoot boots which were the most suitable after trying a few makes.
 

Rosemary28

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 July 2012
Messages
627
Location
Cheshire
He is driving beautifully on the field, but really I want to get some road miles under his belt to keep his weight down. This is the first full year that I have been responsible for him so I'm still learning. His old owner was quite set in his ways in the way he was looked after.

Thank you.
 

Gloi

Well-Known Member
Joined
8 May 2012
Messages
4,988
Please feel free to tell me if there is something glaringly wrong, I am inexperienced and always happy to learn!
Never let that person near your horse's feet again! The frog and back of the foot isn't able to function properly because of the height of the heels. The toes are very short and you can see the semicircle in front of the frog where extra bar/sole is being laid down to protect the pedal bone from previous laminitis. It is no wonder he is sore after a trim. If it was me I would get a different person to have a look at his feet and try and trim them in a way that will allow them to function better. If he has congenitally boxy feet rather than the result of laminitis and bad trimming it will be harder but I would expect someone to be able to gradually improve those feet.

Because of the shape of the feet and the heel height you may may be limited in which boots would fit him though they would be a good idea. I like Scoot Boots but they will not fit him with that heel height and Gloves are unlikely to fit correctly either. I would speak to the people at Saddlery Shop or Hoof Boutique to ask their advice. Some basic boots like Cavellos may fit him for the time being but ask their advice. If you can get someone who can trim in a better way you should hopefully eventually get normal feet.

What I think should really be done is take an x-ray of those feet and find the angle of the pedal bone which is likely too steep from old rotation from laminitis in the past. Once that is known then a series of corrective trims can be done to get the pedal bone back to the correct angle with the ground.
http://www.thelaminitissite.org/articles/faq-rehabilitating-the-feet-after-laminitis
 
Last edited:

Rosemary28

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 July 2012
Messages
627
Location
Cheshire
Never let that person near your horse's feet again! The frog and back of the foot isn't able to function properly because of the height of the heels. The toes are very short and you can see the semicircle in front of the frog where extra bar/sole is being laid down to protect the pedal bone. Why taking the toe back even further is meant to help that, I have no idea but it is no wonder he is sore after a trim. If it was me I would get a different person to have a look at his feet and try and trim them in a way that will allow them to function better. If he has congenitally boxy feet rather than the result of bad trimming it will be harder but I would expect someone to be able to gradually improve those feet.

Because of the boxy nature of the feet and the heel height you may may be limited in which boots would fit him though they would be a good idea. I like Scoot Boots but they will not fit him with that heel height and Gloves are unlikely to fit correctly either. I would speak to the people at Saddlery Shop or Hoof Boutique to ask their advice. Some basic boots like Cavellos may fit him for the time being but ask their advice. If you can get someone who can trim in a better way you should hopefully eventually get normal feet.
Interesting, this chap has trimmed P three times and he's been sore each time after. I thought maybe it was just me over-thinking, I'm glad it's not.
 

Gloi

Well-Known Member
Joined
8 May 2012
Messages
4,988
Interesting, this chap has trimmed P three times and he's been sore each time after. I thought maybe it was just me over-thinking, I'm glad it's not.
Have a read of the laminitis site and then think about getting his feet back to normal function by corrective trimming. Take care of his diet at this time of year to be very careful about sugars so he never gets laminitis again. Do you know why he got it? Has he ever been tested for Cushings and/or Equine metabolic syndrome?
 

Rosemary28

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 July 2012
Messages
627
Location
Cheshire
I'm in East Cheshire. He was tested for cushings but nothing came back, but I'm considering getting him tested again. He's 19 now, and he still loves his job, I just want him to be comfortable but I'm starting to worry I've done him more harm than good in the past :(

One thing I am determined is that he won't get laminitis again, he was really bad a few years ago and is was scary (he wasn't mine then, but I have known him since he was 3). He is so carefully managed in terms of his diet, but I'll be honest I've never really stopped to think about getting his feet properly trimmed, he was always shod by his previous owner but he normally does well without shoes and I'd rather keep him unshod if possible.

Sorry if this is a bit rambling, I've got a lot on my plate at the moment in general and pony feet problems is just adding to my stress :(
 

SEH

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 April 2017
Messages
119
I just want him to be comfortable but I'm starting to worry I've done him more harm than good in the past :(

One thing I am determined is that he won't get laminitis again, he was really bad a few years ago and is was scary (he wasn't mine then, but I have known him since he was 3). He is so carefully managed in terms of his diet, but I'll be honest I've never really stopped to think about getting his feet properly trimmed, he was always shod by his previous owner but he normally does well without shoes and I'd rather keep him unshod if possible.

Sorry if this is a bit rambling, I've got a lot on my plate at the moment in general and pony feet problems is just adding to my stress :(
You are doing the absolute best you can, please don't worry. There are corrective steps you can take to most problems. Forums like this exist partly so we can ask for help. We can't be an expert on everything, especially when you have a lot going on anyways and this is something you generally expect a farrier to keep a close eye on. You have noticed a problem and asked for advice. Farriers should be able to spot problems and you may have just trusted someone who isn't quite as skilled as you thought.

As said above I would go with a new farrier and make it clear what you want before they start based on the comments and advice you get. I personally would ask a farrier to come and see what they say before I voiced any of my concerns, to be sure they are able to recognise a problem like the above commenters have.
 

Rosemary28

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 July 2012
Messages
627
Location
Cheshire
You are doing the absolute best you can, please don't worry. There are corrective steps you can take to most problems. Forums like this exist partly so we can ask for help. We can't be an expert on everything, especially when you have a lot going on anyways and this is something you generally expect a farrier to keep a close eye on. You have noticed a problem and asked for advice. Farriers should be able to spot problems and you may have just trusted someone who isn't quite as skilled as you thought.

As said above I would go with a new farrier and make it clear what you want before they start based on the comments and advice you get. I personally would ask a farrier to come and see what they say before I voiced any of my concerns, to be sure they are able to recognise a problem like the above commenters have.

Thank you. I owe him a lot and I want to do what is best for him!
 

SEH

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 April 2017
Messages
119
Thank you. I owe him a lot and I want to do what is best for him!
I am the same with mine, I am 100% a worrier because I want to do what's best and I never feel like its enough for them! The responsibility is a lot sometimes but if you love him and know him better than anyone else, you have to try and trust that you are looking after him better than anyone else could.
 

paddy555

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 December 2010
Messages
5,326
I don't know if you are in Mark Johnson's area but I gather he travels a fair amount. I would try him. At least you would be getting a good farrier/trimmer specialising in barefoot. He has a FB page.

ETA I think it was Lindylouanne who said she used him.
 
Top