Best thing to do when separating two friends?

ellerslie83

Well-Known Member
Joined
10 April 2011
Messages
127
Location
Windermere
I have two horses, Bob and Jester for many unfortunate reasons, I've had to sell Jester.

He goes on the 20th and the two live out together all year round.

Bob is to go into a new yard when Jester has gone, but I'm not sure however how to minimise the upset this is likely to cause.

I already feel like the wicked witch for splitting them up, as they are best friends and call for each other when the other is not around, as we have them at home and there aren't any other horses.

I do have a field next to the one they are in that I could put one in and another field that can't be seen from their current field where next doors horses can be seen if that could be useful.

So not sure if I need to start a process of splitting them up in advance or to move the other horse on the same day as the sold one goes to his new home or if that would be a bit too much....I really don't know what to do for the best and want to minimise any trauma to them as much as possible, so any advice gratefully received as it's the first time I've had to deal with this issue.
 

tessybear

Well-Known Member
Joined
14 November 2012
Messages
3,012
I would say move them both on the same day, so Bob can make friends at the yard and wont be alone ? :)
 

Auslander

Well-Known Member
Joined
13 November 2010
Messages
11,459
Location
Berkshire
I had to separate my horse from the love of his life recently - they had bonded so closely that if they weren't within sight of each other, merry hell would ensue. Thankfully not when they were being ridden, but I couldn't bring one in without the other!

Alf moved to a new yard, and I did it very quickly and decisively. Brought them both in while I got him ready to travel, then dropped the lorry ramp, took them both out, put her in the field with her new companion, loaded him straight away, and drove off. She yelled for him for a bit, then got distracted by the new horse, and was ok very quickly. He got to the new yard, went out with a new friend, and was fine. I reckon that out of sight/out of mind is the way to go - certainly worked for these two.
 

lyndsayberesford

Well-Known Member
Joined
31 March 2008
Messages
707
Location
Cheshire
I have just had to move my 20yr old horse away from his female friend (17 yrs old) and they had been joined at the hip for 3 yrs! Literally couldnt bring one in without the other, couldnt ride on their own (well mine probably could but the other one wouldnt have accepted being left)

We arranged it that both horses moved on the same day, although there was a gap of about 30 mins where i had to wait for my transport to turn up. My horse went stir crazy as soon as the mare was loaded on her trailer. Heartbreaking and be prepared for lots of stress! I worried mainly as thought the stress would cause a heart attack or stroke in my horse. I tried to distract him with a bucket feed and scratches etc, which worked a little.

I stayed with him the entire time while waiting and loaded him on the truck to move and stood with him in the back for first ten mins as he looked very anxious.

Got him to the new place and let him have a couple of mins looking around then put him straight out in his new paddock! He put his head down within minutes and was eating. The new place has a couple of horses (in separate paddocks) and he seems to be settling well.

Fingers crossed everything goes smoothly for you!
 

LynH

Well-Known Member
Joined
13 October 2010
Messages
1,384
Location
Surrey
My mares had been together for 11yrs when I sent one away to stud for the summer. They had always shouted for each other when turned out without the other. They were both was fine to be ridden on their own but my TB would shout if she was left behind. I expected that they would find it very hard being separated but neither was in the slightest bit bothered. The one at stud happily fitted in with the other mares and the one left at home who had been the more clingy of the two really came out of her shell and became for affectionate and confident and was more relaxed in her stable than she had ever been. They are now back together and back to shouting for each other when one goes out hacking but for those six months apart they actually seemed happier and more relaxed.
By the sound of other people's experiences as well as my own, horses do seem to cope much better than expected and settle into a new herd very easily. Good luck.
 
Top