Brave Pants or just sell

mcnaughty

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I picked up a yearling ID a couple of months ago and she is not being easy. She is big and pushy. No respect for personal space and has now started to wave her hooves around on the end of a lead rope. I’m 52 and spent the last 15 years playing with small ponies with DD. Quite frankly I’m scared of her. Never used to be like this but it’s been a long time since I had a horse. I’m seriously thinking of selling her on. Thoughts please xx
 

Fiona

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Get some knowledgeable help from someone used to handling big young horses...

I can imagine it's a bit different to handling well behaved small ponies x

Fiona
 

mcnaughty

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I’ve had a few very naughty ponies but they are little! She is out 24/7 but brought in daily for a small feed and handling. I’m only feeding her on advice of vet as she needs a youngstock balancer. I feel she is feeling too well now though.
 
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be positive

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What was your long term plan? it sounds as if you would be best selling her and buying something you can enjoy now, whether that is a different, smaller youngster or something ready made to ride depends on the answer to my question but unless you have a really clear long term plan that only she will fit into I think it would be best to find a home for her and replace with something that doesn't scare you, she will get bigger, winter is coming and it may all get worse over the next few months/ years rather than better.
 

mcnaughty

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Yes, the getting bigger is now a concern! Don’t get me wrong I’ve had many babies but before my own kids came along. What about bitting her. I don’t want to bit a yearling though
 

honetpot

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I am a great one for avoiding trouble. Is she leg waving because she is exited about coming in to get food or going out.
Like someone else has said I would cut out the balancer, it will still grow.
I make sure mine who is IDx walks beside me at least 3/4 foot away, if he walks in front, I halt him and he has to back up. Back up taught in the stable from when he was younger, so he is not allowed in the stable unless he stands and waits.
He is now three and huge and at 61, even before I was ill I did not want to battle with him.
He knows which stable he uses so on a windy day he walks in on his own and I lead his field companion and goes out first.
Mares are funny and perhaps she just needs a boss, have you not got a grumpy old pony to put her in her place.
I have ponies and it has been a bit of a shock because he was only about 13hands when I got him at 8,months bought really because I felt sorry for him.
 

DabDab

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Either turn out with decent herd for a year and then reassess with some help to get her on the straight and narrow, or sell.

Big youngsters are not for the faint hearted, and can be a right pita if they are inclined to throw themselves around. And this pushing the boundaries in one way and another will go on for a few years, so you need to be really invested if you want to carry on with her. Personally in your position I think that there would be absolutely no shame in selling and buying something easier in the short term.
 

mcnaughty

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She has two ponies in the field and both are her boss. Hoof waiving is I believe sheer exuberance. I feed first then try in hand practice. I’ll cut out her feed! I feel a bit of a wimp actually. Bought her for fun, bring on and ultimately break and ride but this is not fun!
 

honetpot

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I know I will have to sell mine, but it doesn’t make it any easier, apart from his size he has been such a pleasure.My husband was actually involved in buying him, for the first time in our marriage.
When my brood mare had to be PTs with colic it made it a little bit easier as I had him to look forward to.
 

sport horse

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I used to breed irish draught x and now have warmbloods. The ID youngsters could be very pushy indeed. We have found the warmbloods much easier to handle. Quite honestly what was your reason for buying a yearling? You cannot ride it until it is 3 or 4 years and it w ill get progressively stronger - it is no job for most middle aged women (I am one so I feel free to be honest!) How are you going to break it at 3 years old if you are struggling to handle it as a yearling?

I would suggest you either sell it as you have considered youself, or send it to a good youngstock livery where they can handle it and bring it on for you. Good luck I am sure you will make the right decision. Meanwhile cut out all its food - the ID is desigend to live on a basic diet and there is still plenty of goodness in the grass - we are only September!
 

Celtic Fringe

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I'd second those who have suggested some professional help. My Young Cob, who is an ID cross, was beyond my capability/experience at times as a youngster but fortunately I was able to employ excellent help from someone who was used to handling young stock and he was an immense help and worth every penny. He came to the yard once a week or so and he helped me to sort out issues such as leading in from a distant field (my horse did a great shoulder lean and b*gger off), planting on one spot (when not b*ggering off), picking out hind feet etc. The trainer had the strength which I lack (at 50+ with a dodgy hip!) but also the timing and technique to really make a positive difference. Eventually my cob went to the trainer's yard to be backed at 4 - that proved to be very easy as we had put in a lot of groundwork work first.
 

Celtic Fringe

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Lost for words really. Best I can do is roll my eyes. :rolleyes:
At me or the OP?
Just to add that my horse is now an incredibly laid back 8-year old. It was the 'tearaway youngster' phase that was a steep learning curve as although I was used to a very opinionated Welsh-D a youngster threw up a whole load more challenges. Mine lived on the yard where he was bred but the breeder was as much use as a chocolate teapot - had previously spectacularly failed to back my cob's dam and not put ANY work into her offspring (not even getting on a foal halter). I always knew I'd need good professional help, was prepared to pay and was exceptionally fortunate in my choice of handling help/trainer. I'd always advocate this for anyone who is struggling - well worth the expense for ending up with a sensible and polite horse for (with luck) 20+ years of ridden work.
 

Barton Bounty

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Every horse, young or old that i have had i always do monty roberts join up, it really helps i think although stubborn horses will take longer 😂
 

dogatemysalad

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It's not fun for you. A frightened handler makes a youngster feel unsafe. I'm sure she's lovely and that eventually she'll settle down, but it's a long journey to get there. I'd bite the bullet and take time to find the right home for her. It's hard to let go, but she'd probably feel safer in an environment where she doesn't have to be in control.
It's not a failure to realise something isn't working, it's a failure to do nothing. Don't beat yourself up, like most of us, you aren't a professional who brings on youngsters for a living. It's your hobby, it's expensive in time and money and emotionally draining. Picture how settled she could be in the right home, rather than focusing on the negatives.
 

JennBags

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Lost for words really. Best I can do is roll my eyes. :rolleyes:
How utterly rude, completely unhelpful and totally unnecessary. I know the OP and she is an experienced and sensible horsewoman, she's just clearly in a situation which she's not dealing with right now.

Mcnaughty, I'd sell. You need something that will be kind to you, as we get older we need to take fewer risks with our health. Alternatively send her away to somewhere she can run with other young stock and some older mares who can keep her in line, bring her back in a year or two when she's grown up a bit.
 

Goldenstar

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You should sell .
You are either a person who understands draughts or you are not .
I would never ever have a draught that young in anything in an age matched herd
.
Every horse, young or old that i have had i always do monty roberts join up, it really helps i think although stubborn horses will take longer 😂
No no no to the above . OP, Do try any of system on this youngster that you don’t understand and are used to using you will make things worse .
You do not class a horse as stubborn because it’s in the wrong situation .
Yearlings can be horrible I always handled mine minimally I think that’s the easiest way .
Draughts are hard wired to physically push it shocked me when I got my first one then it clicked with me .
He was only doing what he’s was hard wired to do .
Once you get that with them they are very very easy to train but they can be challenging youngsters in the wrong situation and I would not have one in any situation other than large bare fields and in a group .
This horse will carry this forward into the rest of its life you have to get it right for her so it’s either sell or find a suitable situation for it live in .

Don’t beat yourself up the gap between the dream with horses and the reality is often huge .
 
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