• REMINDER

    Any content, information, or advice found on social media platforms and the wider Internet, including forums such as HHO, should NOT be acted upon unless checked against a reliable, authoritative source, and re-checked, particularly where personal health is at stake. Seek professional advice/confirmation before acting on such at all times.

breakin my 3 yr old

Joined
29 February 2012
Messages
24
give me your thoughts?????
im gonna start breakin my 3 yrold an wanna know which you lot think is more important lungein first or long reinin im a bit stuck hes had a bridle on a few times but only to mouth on:confused:
 

Amy567

Well-Known Member
Joined
29 June 2009
Messages
526
I would say long reigning as it gives them the basics for steering etc. Though I've never completely broken horse in before, just restarted it, with a lot of help haha :p
 
Joined
29 February 2012
Messages
24
yea ive been told both an this is my first attempt on my own horse ive done lungein before to the voice an it turned out really well but i was thinkin the lungein first for the voice aid 'walk on' an 'stand' its a bit confusin lol but thanks for reply :)
 

Alfie&Milo

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 July 2010
Messages
154
Long reining first and mainly, lungeing in endless circles does no good for the joints!
I'm backing my three year old this summer and re-backing my new six year old, they all take things at their own pace but never rush them as it will cause problems in the future. Build a good foundation on the ground and it will be easier in the saddle.

Good luck, it's very rewarding! :)
 

Littlelegs

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 February 2012
Messages
9,355
I get them used to basic voice commands in hand before I either lunge or longline. Prefer to long line first, but with a more forward type its often safer to lunge first. Ideally lunging with 2 reins, so you aren't confined to a circle, don't like lunging a youngster for long. My preferred method is to do as little as possible to hack safely & build up slowly out hacking to 3 good paces & 'baby' steps of shoulder in & leg yield. And then to very slowly introduce proper work on the lunge/ in a school as a rising 5 yr old.
 
Joined
12 July 2010
Messages
1,800
You need to do both. Really in all honesty to do it properly although many will disagree. If you've never long lined before than definitely learn on an older horse who knows what it's all about. It looks much easier than it is if you haven't done it before.

Yes teach them to lunge and voice commands before. If you've never started a horse than seek guidance from a good person that has. Very helpful to the young horse to also have a very competent ground person helping you when you start getting on. Again people will differ and say it isn't necessary. No probably isn't necessary but remember this, mistakes are not easy to fix in a horse that has no idea what you want. They need the confidence so you need to be absolutely sure you can be that person in every circumstance. My husband is my ground person. At least I know when I'm being legged up he won't hit them in the mouth or pull on their mouth. Sounds really stupid doesn't it? Not when you're getting on a baby it isn't.

Not trying to put you off in any way. Just you have to think of so many different little things that you don't on broke and going horses.

Terri
 

Toffee44

Well-Known Member
Joined
17 November 2009
Messages
6,152
Location
West Sussex almost Hants
Go and buy Richard Maxwells, From Birth to Backing.


Will tell you what you need to know.

To be honest if you have only stuck a bridle on a few times hes not yet mouthed or ready to begin backing, I have only done ponys and wouldnt dream of doing a horse alone but I would mouth properly first, introduce tack and ground work in hand.
 

Littlelegs

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 February 2012
Messages
9,355
Sorry just read you're second post, if you aren't already reasonably experienced with lunging, longlining & the breaking process then I second all that equilibrium Ireland has said about getting some help.
 

wildcard

Well-Known Member
Joined
31 March 2011
Messages
499
Location
Yorkshire
I backed my first ever youngster back end of last year started with bitting her and then i lunged her with bridal on but used a cavason over the top A good friend who breaks for a living told me to do it this way.

started with walk getting used to voice commands little bit of trot not much tho and certainly no canter. then added a surcingle get her used to having things round her belly and been tightened up.. from this progressed to Long lining.. No way would i try long lining a youngster who isnt already voice command trained and used to having ropes attached to them could frighten horse and probably yourself and long lining requires much more control and can sometimes make horses feel trapped.

from there progressed to long lining round arena then in field and eventually out and about. Not sure if people think this is the correct way or not as im sure every horse and person differs but worked great for us and i found by having that voice control from the start made everything else after that so easy became the norm This way all done over about a 6-12 week period to everything really steady as was both learning.
 

ladyt25

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 November 2007
Messages
7,792
Location
Leeds
See I am needing to break in my 3 old this spring/summer so this is helpful. I have the Richard Maxwell book so was going to re-read it and check where to start. Mine has had a bridle on and been to a couple of in hand shows last year. He has had a surcingle on and knows how to "walk on", "stand" etc. My sister thought we should trial long-reining but I was not convinced as he is not keep on long lines, ropes flapping etc. He was not amused by the lines so we just walked him up our track with leadropes on each side and dropped behind his shoulder a bit to get him used to us and the ropes being towards his quarters. My intention is to do little lungeing in an arena (safe, enclosed space!) and get him used to voice commands and seeing the ropes and then progress to a little long reining in the arena. To be honest i am not fussed about doing miles on on-road long-reining although I know people who do this and swear by it. i prefer to be on board!

Anyway, I guess it's assessing how each individual horse is going to react to different types of training methods.
 
Top