Breed not Deed

Clodagh

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But why do nearly all recent serious attacks seem to involve American Bulldogs?
I see in the news two women were seriously hurt trying to stop one attacking a child yesterday.
 

paisley

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Partly because these are highlighted in the news?
I would suggest lack of training/exercise/social skills, being kept by people who want a social statement for a dog and being put into a stressful situation (small space, lots of people), but if its a 7lb Yorkie, on the whole the sort of life changing injuries described could be avoided if it turned on you, and not worth a news story.
 

Widgeon

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I think this started at least a few years back, I remember when I very briefly dog walked for the RSPCA, they had a family of five or six American Bullies in that were involved in a court case. Only the staff were allowed to handle them - because of the court case, not because they were known to be agressive. From what I heard it did seem to be very much a "status symbol" kind of situation with the owners. That was ten years ago.
 

Clodagh

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I think the trouble is that these status dogs are such because because they do have the wherewithall to inflict serious damage.
I don't know what the answer is, I feel sorry for the dogs, but if you weren't an idiot why would you even want one? What do they bring to the party that a more 'easy' breed doesn't?
 

Clodagh

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When I was a child, it was 'Alsations' that were known and written about as 'dangerous dogs'. The media look for eye-catching stories, 'woman bitten by Chihuahua' just doesn't have the same ring as 'child mauled by American Bully'.
Because woman bitten by chihuahua probably wouldn't need extensive hospital treatment?

I know labs are responsible for most bites, but they are not genetically programmed to hang on for grim death, or to ignore pain.
 

Karran

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I keep reading of Cane Corso crossed with American Bullie, they look like a giant pitbull and so many seem to live in flats and rarely get exercised, often around young children. Statu dogs, trouble waiting to happen. Big athletic dogs cooped up.
Fairly sure this is the current crop of dogs I see in my local parks. In the seven years I've had Mrs Spaniel, I've seen people cycle through staffs, akitas, sharpeis and now these cane corso mixes. All with the same look and cropped ears. I wish I could work out where they were coming from and who locally is breeding them.
 

tiggipop

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at vera pup class her best friend was a xl bully cross (not sure but my guess is cane corso) he is 13 months old and a rescue. his litter was imported, dont know how but they ended up in rescue.

i was very shocked that the new owner (lovely lady with 2 sons 8 & 10 years old) had not been given any info on this type of dog by the rescue. it was only after falling in love with him and adopting him she found out they are "fighting" breeds. she is doing her absolute best to bring him up socialised, all the family are involved in his training.

BUT saying all that, when the pups graduated kc good citizen pup foundation course we were outside chatting and mingling with the next class when this dog and a english bull terrier had a little growl at each other.... vera and i moved away at this point, i am no wimp but can see this dog is sadly an accident waiting to happen.
 
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Because they are purchased by people who are uneducated and uninvested in their training/socialising. They just want to take photos of them and feed them mass gainer food and walk around the local estate with them on a thick chain whilst actively teaching them to appear aggressive if need be, but with no idea about impulse control.

Or that is who owns them around here.. I have never had a problem with an American Bully, but then I wouldn't have someone in my social circle that doesn't bring up their animals correctly.

As a side note, the brother of a good friend of mine has a 1 year old entire working lines retriever who they bought a week before their baby was born - they got seriously lucky that he is amenable and never went through the nippy phase really. It's a shame he is completely unruly and untrained though as he could be a fantastic dog, so clever and quick off the mark with things. Well idiot girlfriend of the brother, who wanted the first puppy, got jealous that the dog likes the boyfriend more so bought a German Shepherd puppy to be 'her' dog.. so they have a tiny house, they don't walk these dogs, they are completely untrained, and they are both entire. Unfortunately, even at 10 months old I can see that the GS doesn't have the bite inhibition he needs to be safe around a 1yr old child and there is the early 'play' test for dominance but my warnings are falling on deaf ears... I hope this doesn't become another news case one day.
 
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Because they are purchased by people who are uneducated and uninvested in their training/socialising. They just want to take photos of them and feed them mass gainer food and walk around the local estate with them on a thick chain whilst actively teaching them to appear aggressive if need be, but with no idea about impulse control.

Or that is who owns them around here.. I have never had a problem with an American Bully, but then I wouldn't have someone in my social circle that doesn't bring up their animals correctly.

As a side note, the brother of a good friend of mine has a 1 year old entire working lines retriever who they bought a week before their baby was born - they got seriously lucky that he is amenable and never went through the nippy phase really. It's a shame he is completely unruly and untrained though as he could be a fantastic dog, so clever and quick off the mark with things. Well idiot girlfriend of the brother, who wanted the first puppy, got jealous that the dog likes the boyfriend more so bought a German Shepherd puppy to be 'her' dog.. so they have a tiny house, they don't walk these dogs, they are completely untrained, and they are both entire. Unfortunately, even at 10 months old I can see that the GS doesn't have the bite inhibition he needs to be safe around a 1yr old child and there is the early 'play' test for dominance but my warnings are falling on deaf ears... I hope this doesn't become another news case one day.
More money than sense. Just refer them back to your post above if the dog bites the kid. Mind you, these people are thick, so wasted effort.
 

maisie06

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I think the trouble is that these status dogs are such because because they do have the wherewithall to inflict serious damage.
I don't know what the answer is, I feel sorry for the dogs, but if you weren't an idiot why would you even want one? What do they bring to the party that a more 'easy' breed doesn't?
Unfortunately they tend to be owned /bred by a certain type of person who sees the animal as a weapon/status symbol/intimidation tool, they are much bigger and more powerful than staffies so are the next accessory, such a shame as they really can be lovely dogs if treated well, trained and have decent owner.
 
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