Budget field shelter... base/mud!

beingachicken

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26 August 2011
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I’d like to get some cash together over summer and erect a wooden shelter. We are however very exposed up on a hill and seeing all the photos of shelters trashed in the wind makes me a bit nervous 😟
I was thinking the type on skids.
My field is triangular and the bottom corner is very sheltered by big hedges and trees so would be the safest winter or permanent place for it, however being the bottom corner it does get muddier than the very exposed further up ground. Is this a terrible idea or would loads of say, road plannings prevent it becoming boggy inside?
 

SpeedyPony

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23 January 2020
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Personally I would avoid putting a shelter in a poorly drained area, we tried it once and even if you can keep the ground inside dry the area around it will still end up looking like the somme.
 

HeyMich

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We had one put up last year on a pad of hardstanding made out of mostly road planings. The floor inside is fine, and stays dry.

We also had 6 strong posts at the corners concreted in, and bolted to the shelter, so we can unbolt them and move the shelter when needed.

The guys that built it were great, and helped with what was best. Whereabouts are you OP? If you are near me I can recommend them.
 

beingachicken

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To some extent you get what you pay for. Higher quality shelters may be heavier and more sturdy but may cost more.
I know, it’s a bit catch 22 though. The few I personally know of that blew away were lovely. I’d just be gutted. It may be we try and make one. Previously I rented a field privately and we successfully managed a stable and hay shed out of telegraph poles (corners and weight!) and wood.
 

SpeedyPony

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Anchoring it securely down is the best option to prevent it being blown away, but be aware you may fall foul of planning regulations if it is no longer mobile.
I may well be remembering this wrong, but don't planning regs only apply if there is a hard standing? I would imagine that as long as the rest of the shelter can be dismantled/detached from its moorings, it is still a "temporary" structure.
 

mavandkaz

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31 August 2007
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My large field shelter is at the top of the hill and completely exposed, which is why I put it there - the wind mostly comes from that direction and the ponies have no other shelter along that side of the field. It's on skids as we are in an AONB, and It was absolutely fine last weekend in the strong winds (forecast said 70mph).
It was bought from and put up by a professional company. Obviously positioned so the wind hits the back edge.
We have also built a smaller one on the opposite side of the field as during the beast from the east that is where the snow blew in from. That one did once blow over as most of the time it faces into the wind and basically acted as a sail. So we removed a board from the back wall so the wind can go though it, and again it was fine last weekend.
Both are on earth and are dry inside. We have since hardcored outside the main one as was getting too muddy.
 

JennBags

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I may well be remembering this wrong, but don't planning regs only apply if there is a hard standing? I would imagine that as long as the rest of the shelter can be dismantled/detached from its moorings, it is still a "temporary" structure.
No, the structure has to be both moveable and moved regularly.
 

sport horse

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Make sure it is positioned so that the prevaiing wind hits the back of the shelter rather than blowing in the front and lifting the building. I have bolted mine to concreted posts. I have used a base of hardcore and road planings with wood pellets on top. Take droppings and wet out but always leave a base of pellets to blind out the road planings. If you can unbolt and show you can move it you may be lucky.
 

Hack4fun

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29 April 2017
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Make sure it is positioned so that the prevaiing wind hits the back of the shelter rather than blowing in the front and lifting the building. I have bolted mine to concreted posts. I have used a base of hardcore and road planings with wood pellets on top. Take droppings and wet out but always leave a base of pellets to blind out the road planings. If you can unbolt and show you can move it you may be lucky.
As soon as hard standing or posts go in planning permission is needed.
 

ROMANY 1959

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20 July 2009
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Flintshire
My cousin, put a permanent shelter up. Had PP.. she obtained 2 big concrete road barrier things, with eye hooks in the side, put them either side of the shelter, and used canvas HGV rope to tie the roof down.. shelter never moved an inch. It helped that her dad worked for Tarmac at the time. And had contacts with people doing road works
 
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