Buying a young horse

eahotson

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Just starting to dip my toe into the horse market.I want something very safe and I do have a good budget.Rang a dealer yesterday that has a good reputation.She said she might be able to help me in about a month but indicated that she sold young but genuine horses.I shall be going horse shopping with my very experienced instructor.As far as I know, a young horse is a young horse (she was talking about four years old) even if it is, for its age,very level headed and sensible.On the other hand it should be unspoilt.Any thoughts?
 

LegOn

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Young horses do young horse thing no matter how level headed and sensible... it can take alot of help, support and an instructor looking at you ride more days than not!! If you want something VERY safe, get something proven to be VERY safe and sensibility usually comes with age... there is always the exception to the rule but be very clear they are still young horses and will have moments of developmental stress that can come out sideways...
 

sportsmansB

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Every single day with a young horse you are shaping it for the rest of its life. Every correction (or lack thereof!) in the saddle or on the ground turns them into the horse they will become in the future.
Some are lovely at 4 and go through pure terrors as 5yo's or when they strengthen up at 6, especially if they have already found some loopholes in their training...

Before taking on a young horse, you need to be absolutely certain that you have the knowledge, confidence and experience to deal with every situation which might arise in their daily lives and their training, if you want to give them a good start. If you can't honestly say that, then just don't do it. get a nice school master that someone else has put the work into and enjoy it.
 

eahotson

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Young horses do young horse thing no matter how level headed and sensible... it can take alot of help, support and an instructor looking at you ride more days than not!! If you want something VERY safe, get something proven to be VERY safe and sensibility usually comes with age... there is always the exception to the rule but be very clear they are still young horses and will have moments of developmental stress that can come out sideways...
Thank you.I shall take that advice very seriously.
 

eahotson

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Every single day with a young horse you are shaping it for the rest of its life. Every correction (or lack thereof!) in the saddle or on the ground turns them into the horse they will become in the future.
Some are lovely at 4 and go through pure terrors as 5yo's or when they strengthen up at 6, especially if they have already found some loopholes in their training...

Before taking on a young horse, you need to be absolutely certain that you have the knowledge, confidence and experience to deal with every situation which might arise in their daily lives and their training, if you want to give them a good start. If you can't honestly say that, then just don't do it. get a nice school master that someone else has put the work into and enjoy it.
Thank you. I will do that.
 

Leandy

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I want something very safe
Then I wouldn't recommend starting looking with a 4 year old from a dealer. At the best it will be lovely but green and uneducated young horse which may be fairly sensible and have the potential to be be what you are after if brought on correctly but will still be inexperienced, green and uneducated and hence somewhat unpredictable at present. At worst it will be practically unbroken, spooky, sharp and may have some issues which the dealer, with the best will in the world, may be unaware of. If your key criterion is that you want something very safe, then you would be better looking at more established horses already proven to be very safe doing what you want to do. You won't find that in a four year old. Having said that personally I have always bought youngsters for myself exactly so I can shape them and have the satisfaction of bringing them on myself. But I'm aware they will not start out (and may never be) very safe. Most horses simply aren't, so if that is really what you need and want then you are better looking for one which is that now.
 

spacefaer

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I've got the most fabulous laid back, easygoing 4 yr old Irish draught. He nannied my 5 yr old on their first fun ride last Sunday. He's perfect in traffic, easy to get on and do everything with.

However, there's a whole world of knowledge that he doesn't have, a whole world he hasn't seen and while I'm delighted to be able to introduce him to that world, I'm aware that I have 40+ years experience so that when he questions me and tries to have alternative opinions, I'm ready.

He might stay easy and laidback as he grows up, he might not and he'll certainly question me as we get there!
 

eahotson

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Some of the most lovely 4 y/o have a total nightmare teenager phase at 6

If you have a budget (and we all do) I would look at the older end of the spectrum based on what you have said you are looking for rather than younger.

A nice 13 /14 y/o would be written off by some but do a wonderful job for 10 years
A nice 13 to 14 year old would do me nicely.I do have a decent budget though.
 

lannerch

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I always buy young horses , my current horse I bought as an unbroken 2yo which obviously is more of a risk but she’s a complete babe and potentially horse of a lifetime she’s now 4 and very chilled and doing better than I could have hoped for.
I love buying young horses as they are what you make them , no one has ruined them and you know exactly what they have and haven’t done.
You build a bond together and end up knowing them inside out.

I have great support though and as nowadays I don’t have the time required to bring on a youngster ( they need little and often ) so I have her professionally produced for me .
If you have good support I would certainly consider it, my 4yo to hack out is like riding an older established horse she is so chilled and brave.
 

eahotson

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Funnily enough I was looking at another dealers page where they had a couple of nice looking cobs of nine years.They were mares.The deal said that they were ex brood mares and therefore very green.Nice temperaments but not suitable for novice or nervous riders.
 

Leandy

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Funnily enough I was looking at another dealers page where they had a couple of nice looking cobs of nine years.They were mares.The deal said that they were ex brood mares and therefore very green.Nice temperaments but not suitable for novice or nervous riders.
Well they don't sound obviously suitable either! I'm not sure why you say you have a good budget but don't seem to be starting by looking at ones which are what you want now? Do you actually want one to bring on? You don't really say what you want this horse for?
 

eahotson

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Well they don't sound obviously suitable either! I'm not sure why you say you have a good budget but don't seem to be starting by looking at ones which are what you want now? Do you actually want one to bring on? You don't really say what you want this horse for?
I was just flicking through the dealers website but no I am not going to buy them.I want a nice alrounder.
 

Peglo

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I’ve just bought a younger pony who turned 6 the day after I got her home. She has been great so far although not done much more than hacking. Great temperament and so friendly. But very different to my 12 and 13 year olds I’ve gotten previously. They were just more together if you get me, even though the TB wasn’t as well behaved. But all horses are different. Good luck with your search
 

eahotson

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Th
I’ve just bought a younger pony who turned 6 the day after I got her home. She has been great so far although not done much more than hacking. Great temperament and so friendly. But very different to my 12 and 13 year olds I’ve gotten previously. They were just more together if you get me, even though the TB wasn’t as well behaved. But all horses are different. Good luck with your search[/QUOT Thankyou.
 
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