Castration question...

bex1984

Well-Known Member
Joined
21 February 2007
Messages
5,745
Location
Leicestershire
Our puppy is now 5 and a half months old and we'd always intended to castrate him at 6 months. We have his older brother who is quite a dominant dog and we want to avoid the little one getting a bit ballsy and taking him on (so far older dog is firmly in charge and would not take kindly to being challenged...)

So, we're thinking about getting him booked in for the chop in a few weeks time. However, he still seems quite immature and is not leg cocking (rarely wees on walks at all). He has definitely started to hit adolescence though and has become a bit of a teenager in the last few weeks.

Is the lack of leg cocking a reason to hold off? Or are we risking testosteroney fights between the two boys?
 

Alec Swan

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 October 2009
Messages
21,082
Location
Norfolk.
It would be highly unlikely that a pup of six months would get 'ballsy' with an adult dog. If the adult dog is already aware of himself then it would be unlikely that he'll stand too much from a pup. If you castrate early then the chances are that the pup will grow beyond it's likely growth than if it were it to remain entire. With the denial of a generally testosterone assisted growth, males become neutered in ways other than the obvious. Entire dogs often attempt to mount the castrated. Castrated dogs take on a feminine head and frame, when they're cut, and muscle wastage or lack of structure is all so often the end result.

If you do your research, via google, you'll see that there are all so often life shortening health risks attached to castration and as the dog ages. In Germany and many other European countries, the practice is viewed as mutilation and is outlawed.

Your dog, your choice, but castration generally only ever stops one thing, a dog from siring pups. It never, that I've witnessed, achieves anything else and I would always counsel strongly against it. Your vets won't, of course, but then they have a living to earn!

Alec.
 

bex1984

Well-Known Member
Joined
21 February 2007
Messages
5,745
Location
Leicestershire
I know there are good arguments against castration and hear what you are saying but I think we're decided that we will do it, it's just when.I definitely don't subscribe to any theories that castration would calm a dog.... Our 5 y o castrated, bonkers and sometimes fear aggressive dog is proof of that. It's more of a practical consideration for us as they spend time in their breeder's pack of mostly bitches and at the yard, park etc running off steam.
 

bex1984

Well-Known Member
Joined
21 February 2007
Messages
5,745
Location
Leicestershire
I guess I'm worried about the obnoxious teenage phase of asserting himself, humping everything and roaming... This did calm down after castration in our older dog.
 

Dobiegirl

Well-Known Member
Joined
2 February 2011
Messages
6,845
Location
Wildest Somerset
What breed of dog is yours, I would never neuter a dog until it was physically and mentally mature, my male Dobe was just shy of 2years old when I had him done and I can honestly say its not had any adverse affect on him at all. My male Dobe is a wonderful specimen of the breed and there is nothing feminine about him, as as regards muscle wastage he is fully muscled and fighting fit. When he had his cruciate op he did lose his muscle but he soon regained it once his exercise resumed.
 

gunnergundog

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 August 2010
Messages
3,106
I guess I'm worried about the obnoxious teenage phase of asserting himself, humping everything and roaming... This did calm down after castration in our older dog.
There's a wonderful thing....a bit time consuming.....but it's called training!! :)

Seriously, though castration is not a quick fix and any of the above behaviours you are worried about can be trained not to happen.
 
Top