Cheltenham gag people

arwenplusone

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Can you talk to me about why you use one & what you feel it does for your horse?

It is next on my list of bits to try....
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kick_On

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ideal for strong horse; the gag works by appling poll pressure and brings their head onto their chest and only works when you apply pressure via hands, otherwise it's a snaffle. Harsh hand will always cause problems with any bit, but IMO excellent bit for head strong horses
To try you can also ride in double reins, attach one rein onto running cheek pieces and other rein attached to snaffle ring. If you ride on snaffle and then if you need to stop pick up running rein.
I use on all my hunters as ideal way of stopping strong horses, some horses will react very well to poll pressure others hate-if they hate you need to go down pelham route IMO
 

kick_On

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IMO - i'd removed 3 ring gag, uck, as there as much good as dishwater!!!

Get bit on bit loan to see if it works and if you need sharper reaction with get your cheek pices on rope NOT leather.

But also remember than if you haul with both reins horses will lean, so just give with on rein (NOT saw) head should drop into contact and bit will act even more, therefore stopping
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Also sit up and elbow into stomach will also help alot
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milliepops

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The alternative if the poll pressure is a problem, is to try a Balding gag, which is like the Cheltenham but has loose rings.

I used one in the past on a horse that pulled down a lot. With the loose rings, I found the poll pressure was reduced as the rings didn't turn round when you took a pull. (ETA - so reduced the leverage) The action was more to raise the bit in the horse's mouth to help bring it up in front.
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ironhorse

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I would still always use a Cheltenham gag with two reins - ride off the snaffle until you need the brakes and then turn your hand slightly to activate the gag action.
It is a very good bit for anything that is strong but tends to lean on/go behind a pelham.
I used it with great success on a young show cob whose main issue was spooking or whippping round and then galloping off; he would also launch into a fence as soon as you turned.
The gag instantly taught him some manners and also helped with his general tendency to get stronger and stronger during a round or as you continued to canter.
It allowed me to work him correctly in the complete confidence that he couldn't run off and after a yr he had developed so much more balance and lightness that I only needed to use it for XC - he would SJ/WH in a snaffle and showed in a double bridle, ridden off the bridoon.
 

martlin

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I use baldig/cheltenham gag on a biggish ISH with a tendency to lean/drop down on the forehand. She is not strong as such and stoppable in a snaffle, but due to size and posture very difficult to keep together and on the hocks.
The jumping is much better, she makes better shape over the fence and doesn't roll poles on the front.
 

Slinkyunicorn

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I have a CG for my cob - used it when it was all getting a bit exciting when out hacking - as ironhorse had - spinning round and galloping off etc. Used it with both reins - only used running rein when brakes were needed. I had a lesson when I first used it to make sure I was using it properly and to make sure that coblet was happy in it. Used it for about 6 months - but only used the running rein about 3 times druing that time, have now been able to go back to a baucher - but wouldn't hesitiate to use it again if necessary. My coblet knows as soon as it goes in her mouth and just behaves.
 

CethinRavenhill

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I use one on my Welsh Section B for XC - he is exceptionally strong!

I would also recommend using 2 reins, gives differentiation to your aids. It also means the bit is not pulled up in their mouth the whole time.

Good luck!

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ROMANY 1959

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We use one on sasha, she is ex polo now plays polocross...when we first got her we used a snaffle, but had no brakes, so now use CG , but it can easily be changed to snaffle for school work just move reins to the snaffle not cheek
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old hand

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I have a cherry roller loose ring cheltenham. Most horses go very nicely in it and it does not ruin their mouths provided you hold and release when the horse softens. Works on very strong horses but the over light feel when they soften needs to be backed up with a lot of leg. It is not a bit for riders that lean on their reins. I find that if you just square your shoulders when they start pulling that is usually enough for even the strongest horse. The cherry rollers give them something to play with. Hard to get hold of though, that is why mine will never be sold even though it spends most of its time in the bit box.
 
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