Confident rider ????

Joined
2 October 2018
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18
Hi
I have been reading adverts as id like to loan next year, most say no novices.. must be experienced/ confident rider.
So my question is can u still be an experienced / confident rider without doing jumps & competitions, lets say u can walk trot snd canter confidentaly on a school riding horse, and have ridden different types of horses including hacking out. Or do they simply mean confident on a difficult horse.. Im not really interested in shows and jumping, id just like to be able to care for and ride in or out of the school for leisure
Thanks๐Ÿ˜€
 
Joined
14 January 2018
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Probably every owner menas something different! The only way to find out what the owner of a horse that you are interested means is to ring up and ask them.
I agree with Pearlsasinger that it's worth investigating with owners what they mean. It all comes back to there not being a fully agreed definition of what the term 'novice' means.

Be honest about your capabilities and experiences if you decide to contact an owner and just talk through what they mean. Most owners will be grateful for a decent conversation before booking to view as it saves everyone wasted time if the horse isn't suitable. Loaning is a big thing for the owner and loaner so it's important to communicate.

In answer to your question, you can definitely be a confident without doing competitions (some people just don't like competing). You can also be confident in walk/trot/canter with a good seat without having jumped. I do think that even a little bit of jumping helps develop balance and stability in the saddle, but if you have never jumped it doesn't mean you aren't confident, just not experienced at jumping.

What I found when I had my first horse is that it was different to riding school horses and a bit like driving - you don't really learn until you have your own horse (or car!) and are faced with situations you wouldn't have met on a riding school horse. But having confidence in your ability, not over-horsing yourself and having people around you to give support and advice will help when you do decide to loan a horse.
 

be positive

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Probably every owner menas something different! The only way to find out what the owner of a horse that you are interested means is to ring up and ask them.
I agree, to me confident means the rider has the confidence to deal with something unexpected and the ability to stay on if something slightly out of the ordinary happens, no need to jump or compete to prove yourself but being able to sit a spook or stumble without having a panic would be, most advertisers will put something such as confident rider wanted to try and weed out the ones that are nervous so it is definitely worth a call to discuss further.
 
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This is a difficult one........ I'm a happy hacker, and don't compete (no transport!), and as an older rider I'm not sure I would describe myself as "confident", tho' have had to get all my horses past stuff on the roads that if I thought about it would make me quail!!

For e.g., I've just hacked out on my youngster this morning; we encountered two tractor-dragons and a JCB, both in a narrow lane where we had to pull into a gateway - oh and a HUGE puddle right across the road where an anaconda and a croc both lurk! She was looking to me her rider, to give her confidence in those situations, because this is what youngsters need - and having got that reassurance from me, she was fine! But would I describe myself as a "confident" rider...........??? I dunno, if I'm honest no I wouldn't - I know that I would hesitate to ride a sharp or problem horse, or be happy to ride a fit hunter in an open field for example!! I'm a bit of a wuss if I'm honest!

I think the problem is definition: what is "experienced", what is "confident". By "confident" would you expect someone to happily hop up top a difficult and/or young horse, a rude/bolshy horse, or deal with a remedial situation, and be perfectly confident to take up the reins and canter in an open field say, or hunt on it??

A lot of the time people say they're looking for a "confident" rider when what they actually mean is would someone please take on their problem horse and sort it out for them!!

An interesting debate this!
 

ester

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I agree, to me confident means the rider has the confidence to deal with something unexpected and the ability to stay on if something slightly out of the ordinary happens, no need to jump or compete to prove yourself but being able to sit a spook or stumble without having a panic would be, most advertisers will put something such as confident rider wanted to try and weed out the ones that are nervous so it is definitely worth a call to discuss further.
This, I was going to say confidence to deal with surprises, particularly out hacking so as not to make things rapidly worse as the most random things can happen. (My own sharer had a bit of a situation when she picked up half a tree branch in his tail once for instance!)
 
Joined
2 October 2018
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18
This is a difficult one........ I'm a happy hacker, and don't compete (no transport!), and as an older rider I'm not sure I would describe myself as "confident", tho' have had to get all my horses past stuff on the roads that if I thought about it would make me quail!!

For e.g., I've just hacked out on my youngster this morning; we encountered two tractor-dragons and a JCB, both in a narrow lane where we had to pull into a gateway - oh and a HUGE puddle right across the road where an anaconda and a croc both lurk! She was looking to me her rider, to give her confidence in those situations, because this is what youngsters need - and having got that reassurance from me, she was fine! But would I describe myself as a "confident" rider...........??? I dunno, if I'm honest no I wouldn't - I know that I would hesitate to ride a sharp or problem horse, or be happy to ride a fit hunter in an open field for example!! I'm a bit of a wuss if I'm honest!

I think the problem is definition: what is "experienced", what is "confident". By "confident" would you expect someone to happily hop up top a difficult and/or young horse, a rude/bolshy horse, or deal with a remedial situation, and be perfectly confident to take up the reins and canter in an open field say, or hunt on it??

A lot of the time people say they're looking for a "confident" rider when what they actually mean is would someone please take on their problem horse and sort it out for them!!

An interesting debate this!
Hi thanks for your reply, im also not a young one anymore ive hit the 40s and learning a whole new skill, had my first canter this morning and loved every second.. tho no part of it was correct or glamourous by any means, but ive fot the feel of it and ive had to learn how to bring her back to earth and settle to walking afterwards as she gets a bit excited, im volunteering at a local sanctuary and just started to help out at the rda.. all because i want to be confident and i want to learn, but .. like you say you probably dont really learn until u come to obstacles u only get when you own or share.. i really want to loan to progress but the ads just are just not very inviting or dont fit the bill๐Ÿค”
 

be positive

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Hi thanks for your reply, im also not a young one anymore ive hit the 40s and learning a whole new skill, had my first canter this morning and loved every second.. tho no part of it was correct or glamourous by any means, but ive fot the feel of it and ive had to learn how to bring her back to earth and settle to walking afterwards as she gets a bit excited, im volunteering at a local sanctuary and just started to help out at the rda.. all because i want to be confident and i want to learn, but .. like you say you probably dont really learn until u come to obstacles u only get when you own or share.. i really want to loan to progress but the ads just are just not very inviting or dont fit the bill๐Ÿค”
You are very much a novice at the moment then, the problem you will come across with a full loan, maybe not such an issue with a share, is that there will be very few available that are genuinely suited to a novice because they will be kept by their owners while they are doing a good job and then sold on to be replaced once they are "grown out of" if that happens, it is not the same as the aged pony that stays in one home for years then remains in the same ownership being loaned out, people just cannot afford to retain ownership of a valuable horse and have another very often, so the ones that do come up for loan are frequently quirky in some way or unsound so cannot be sold but may be suited to quiet hacking.

A share or purchase is probably easier to find.
 
Joined
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You are very much a novice at the moment then, the problem you will come across with a full loan, maybe not such an issue with a share, is that there will be very few available that are genuinely suited to a novice because they will be kept by their owners while they are doing a good job and then sold on to be replaced once they are "grown out of" if that happens, it is not the same as the aged pony that stays in one home for years then remains in the same ownership being loaned out, people just cannot afford to retain ownership of a valuable horse and have another very often, so the ones that do come up for loan are frequently quirky in some way or unsound so cannot be sold but may be suited to quiet hacking.

A share or purchase is probably easier to find.
I suppose that makes sense, im just looking around at the moment, to get an idea of whats around and where, i need more experience riding first, thanks again for your advice ๐Ÿ˜€
 
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This, I was going to say confidence to deal with surprises, particularly out hacking so as not to make things rapidly worse as the most random things can happen. (My own sharer had a bit of a situation when she picked up half a tree branch in his tail once for instance!)
Oh.... dare i ask what happened next ?
 

Ambers Echo

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13 October 2017
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1,363
Hi
I have been reading adverts as id like to loan next year, most say no novices.. must be experienced/ confident rider.
So my question is can u still be an experienced / confident rider without doing jumps & competitions, lets say u can walk trot snd canter confidentaly on a school riding horse, and have ridden different types of horses including hacking out.
It's great that you are feeling confident with your lessons and are wanting to do more. But you are very definitely not 'experienced' - assuming the 6 or so lessons you talk about on your 1st canter thread are pretty much the only riding you have done. There is a world of difference between riding RS horses under instruction and riding a privately owned horse independently - whether on loan or as a share. 'No novices' can just mean a sharer/loaner does not want their horse ridden by a novice. But 'needs a confident rider' to me implies a horse who needs the rider to be in charge. Either because they are spooky, or strong, or opinionated, or onward bound, or sensitive, or sharp, or get their own confidence from a rider or a hundred other reasons. Max needs a confident rider or he'll nap. Amber needs a confident rider because she's so powerful and enthusiastic. Ginny needs a confident rider because she is young and green. None are 'problem' horses. They just need effective, positive riding and clarity of aids. You only really learn that from fairly extensive experience on horses who present more of a challenge or question than your typical RS horse who takes a lot of their instruction from the person stood in the middle and not solely from the rider. So for you I would steer well clear of any ad saying anything like that. Nothing worse than being over-horsed and rapidly discovering your confidence disappearing down the drain! Or worse still getting hurt. Hope you find something suitable. Good luck
 
Joined
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It's great that you are feeling confident with your lessons and are wanting to do more. But you are very definitely not 'experienced' - assuming the 6 or so lessons you talk about on your 1st canter thread are pretty much the only riding you have done. There is a world of difference between riding RS horses under instruction and riding a privately owned horse independently - whether on loan or as a share. 'No novices' can just mean a sharer/loaner does not want their horse ridden by a novice. But 'needs a confident rider' to me implies a horse who needs the rider to be in charge. Either because they are spooky, or strong, or opinionated, or onward bound, or sensitive, or sharp, or get their own confidence from a rider or a hundred other reasons. Max needs a confident rider or he'll nap. Amber needs a confident rider because she's so powerful and enthusiastic. Ginny needs a confident rider because she is young and green. None are 'problem' horses. They just need effective, positive riding and clarity of aids. You only really learn that from fairly extensive experience on horses who present more of a challenge or question than your typical RS horse who takes a lot of their instruction from the person stood in the middle and not solely from the rider. So for you I would steer well clear of any ad saying anything like that. Nothing worse than being over-horsed and rapidly discovering your confidence disappearing down the drain! Or worse still getting hurt. Hope you find something suitable. Good luck
Hi thanks for your reply, i agree with you totally, i was trying to get an idea on where i would be say 6 months from now (confidence wise) and trying to figure out where i would fit in with the whole experienced part.. and i agree, i can learn the basics at riding school but theres so much more u dont get the chance to learn i guess until you have your own, like others have said complications or spooks and things that woulnt crop up in a menage, i.e tightening the girth or stirrups while in the saddle, opening and closing gates etc.. all silly things but things that would need to be learned amongst the rest, just bits ive been pondering over lol.
 
Joined
2 October 2018
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18
It's great that you are feeling confident with your lessons and are wanting to do more. But you are very definitely not 'experienced' - assuming the 6 or so lessons you talk about on your 1st canter thread are pretty much the only riding you have done. There is a world of difference between riding RS horses under instruction and riding a privately owned horse independently - whether on loan or as a share. 'No novices' can just mean a sharer/loaner does not want their horse ridden by a novice. But 'needs a confident rider' to me implies a horse who needs the rider to be in charge. Either because they are spooky, or strong, or opinionated, or onward bound, or sensitive, or sharp, or get their own confidence from a rider or a hundred other reasons. Max needs a confident rider or he'll nap. Amber needs a confident rider because she's so powerful and enthusiastic. Ginny needs a confident rider because she is young and green. None are 'problem' horses. They just need effective, positive riding and clarity of aids. You only really learn that from fairly extensive experience on horses who present more of a challenge or question than your typical RS horse who takes a lot of their instruction from the person stood in the middle and not solely from the rider. So for you I would steer well clear of any ad saying anything like that. Nothing worse than being over-horsed and rapidly discovering your confidence disappearing down the drain! Or worse still getting hurt. Hope you find something suitable. Good luck
Hi thanks for your reply, i agree with you totally, i was trying to get an idea on where i would be say 6 months from now (confidence wise) and trying to figure out where i would fit in with the whole experienced part.. and i agree, i can learn the basics at riding school but theres so much more u dont get the chance to learn i guess until you have your own, like others have said complications or spooks and things that woulnt crop up in a menage, i.e tightening the girth or stirrups while in the saddle, opening and closing gates etc.. all silly things but things that would need to be learned amongst the rest, just bits ive been pondering over lol.
Also yes.. i never know if my horse is responding to my aids or listening to instructor, mention the word trot and he wakes up, and i swear he knows where all the letters are in the menage!!๐Ÿ˜
 

Nari

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Maybe when you're looking to loan it would be worth putting some adverts & feelers out for a share. Make it clear that you want something suitable for a novice who is coming off rs horses & wants to learn more. They are out there, and sometimes a well worded advert will make something think that it would be nice for their horse to get a bit more work while they get a few days off. Be careful though, as others have said private horses are often very different to rs ones & one person's definition of a novice ride maybe very different from someone elses. Rule 1 on looking is sk the owner to ride first, if they won't then don't get on, and if you have doubts about what you see politely say you don't think you're up to it & walk away.
 

ester

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I was only asking because in my experience a lot of 'share' horses do seem to have quite a few issues so finding the right one with the right owner might be tricky. I do know a couple of people with more than one horse though that are happy to have someone riding the spare - I very old friend of ours resurfaced and used to ride mine out with mum on hers a couple of times a week and worked for everyone even though she was quite novice- I wouldn't have let her take him out on her own until she had been riding him for a while.

Loan wise if they are up for moving yards you might get a better option, but equally you'd need someone that was happy with your care experience levels - which on a good yard would probably not be a worry.

Re. the branch incident he was being a plonker, I think she flapped a bit (she wasn't on her own) and he was spun in a fair few circles which probably did wind him up a bit more but at least kept him in a safe area. She just wanted to get off to resolve it for him and given that generally he's a laid back sort was surprised when he wouldn't stand still to do so! I think the other rider got it out in the end but essentially he might have charged off from it had she reacted more to his reaction. I think mostly it took her by surprise as he isn't usually like that!
Had I been on him he'd have got a stern 'standstill' and would have done so!

He always got away with a lot more with her as she was very nice to him. But he was established and I was very secure in knowing that he would never be too daft and when the chips were down he'd always be good, also absolutely 100% in all traffic. She was novice when it came to care, a slightly novice rider still but she had been riding another horse on the yard for a while, she was a very nice person and that she would have good support on the yard when I wasn't there. Sometimes it's about making the right contacts :).
 
Joined
2 October 2018
Messages
18
Maybe when you're looking to loan it would be worth putting some adverts & feelers out for a share. Make it clear that you want something suitable for a novice who is coming off rs horses & wants to learn more. They are out there, and sometimes a well worded advert will make something think that it would be nice for their horse to get a bit more work while they get a few days off. Be careful though, as others have said private horses are often very different to rs ones & one person's definition of a novice ride maybe very different from someone elses. Rule 1 on looking is sk the owner to ride first, if they won't then don't get on, and if you have doubts about what you see politely say you don't think you're up to it & walk away.
Great 1st rule, thanks
 
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2 October 2018
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I was only asking because in my experience a lot of 'share' horses do seem to have quite a few issues so finding the right one with the right owner might be tricky. I do know a couple of people with more than one horse though that are happy to have someone riding the spare - I very old friend of ours resurfaced and used to ride mine out with mum on hers a couple of times a week and worked for everyone even though she was quite novice- I wouldn't have let her take him out on her own until she had been riding him for a while.

Loan wise if they are up for moving yards you might get a better option, but equally you'd need someone that was happy with your care experience levels - which on a good yard would probably not be a worry.

Re. the branch incident he was being a plonker, I think she flapped a bit (she wasn't on her own) and he was spun in a fair few circles which probably did wind him up a bit more but at least kept him in a safe area. She just wanted to get off to resolve it for him and given that generally he's a laid back sort was surprised when he wouldn't stand still to do so! I think the other rider got it out in the end but essentially he might have charged off from it had she reacted more to his reaction. I think mostly it took her by surprise as he isn't usually like that!
Had I been on him he'd have got a stern 'standstill' and would have done so!

He always got away with a lot more with her as she was very nice to him. But he was established and I was very secure in knowing that he would never be too daft and when the chips were down he'd always be good, also absolutely 100% in all traffic. She was novice when it came to care, a slightly novice rider still but she had been riding another horse on the yard for a while, she was a very nice person and that she would have good support on the yard when I wasn't there. Sometimes it's about making the right contacts :).
Ah i see, ive made a good contact at a nearby livery, shes apparently great with helping new owners out and theres staff on hand for advice etc, re the care side that should grow while im volunteering with the 50 plus horses and ponies they have there, so with my 2 x private lessons a week and the voluntary work im hoping i will become more "confident' over the coming months ๐Ÿ˜€
 

SpringArising

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I think you will probably struggle to gain the trust of anyone wanting a sharer for at least the next year or so.

Most people who have horses for share want someone who can handle themselves/the horse under most circumstances, unless it's a complete dope on a rope type who never looks at anything.

I would definitely stick with the lessons for now - without meaning to sound horrible if you take on a share you will most likely be way out of your depth at this stage and may end up scaring yourself and the horse.

I would set yourself a goal - i.e. when you can competently canter without stirrups, you can look for a share horse!
 
Joined
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I think you will probably struggle to gain the trust of anyone wanting a sharer for at least the next year or so.

Most people who have horses for share want someone who can handle themselves/the horse under most circumstances, unless it's a complete dope on a rope type who never looks at anything.

I would definitely stick with the lessons for now - without meaning to sound horrible if you take on a share you will most likely be way out of your depth at this stage and may end up scaring yourself and the horse.

I would set yourself a goal - i.e. when you can competently canter without stirrups, you can look for a share horse!
What a good idea.. il make it my goal!
 

Fiona

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Fingers crossed OP that by next Spring you are ready for a share arrangement.

My hubby's 20 yo mare for instance is very under utilized due to his hip problems, I'd be happy to have a novice come and hack her out with me under supervision, with the possibility of solo hacking & school riding when they were more experienced.

I'm sure you will find a suitable arrangement when the time comes.

FIona
 
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