Counting Poo's

Coblover63

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 September 2012
Messages
1,512
Location
Bridgnorf, innit!
I have a 16hh Clydesdale X and a 12hh year-long filly who live out, rugless, on 3 and a quarter acres. The grass is growing well but their preferred eating areas are short. I have a pen where I have stored hay over winter which has a bit of grass, so I know the grass is growing well... it's about 4+" at the mo. Plus the patches where they poo are starting to get overgrown and tufty again already. I've now run out of hay and am loathe to have another round bale delivered because when my gelding decides grass is best, he'll stop eating hay, just like that and I don't want it sitting there all summer, I need to lift the pallets and clear up the area over summer. I'm of the opinion that the grass is obviously growing so they don't need hay any more..... but in the last week, the number of poos they do has dropped off dramatically. (I'm a saddo who counts so that I know they're getting enough too eat). This could be because spring grass is less fibrous than hay.... but I'm still worried that they're not getting enough to eat! Also, at this time of year, I don't want them to be too fat, with a summer of good grass ahead of them. Has anyone else's horse's poo count dropped? Should I continue to supplement hay? They both seem very happy.
 

vickie123

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 September 2013
Messages
86
Yes, mine have dropped which has coincided with their move to the summer paddock with good grass coverage. Seems to happen every year at this time. They all live out 24/7. The poos may be less but the barrow feels heavier. I have put a bit of hay out (just a section every other day from a small bale) and they are picking at it but not really that interested and would be fine without it now I’m sure. Mind you, we’ve got a few cold nights coming up so I’ll monitor the hay situation. It’s a lot easier with small bales in that respect as opposed to getting in a large round bale that could get wasted.
 

Mister Ted

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 August 2012
Messages
337
Location
East Lothian
I have a 16hh Clydesdale X and a 12hh year-long filly who live out, rugless, on 3 and a quarter acres. The grass is growing well but their preferred eating areas are short. I have a pen where I have stored hay over winter which has a bit of grass, so I know the grass is growing well... it's about 4+" at the mo. Plus the patches where they poo are starting to get overgrown and tufty again already. I've now run out of hay and am loathe to have another round bale delivered because when my gelding decides grass is best, he'll stop eating hay, just like that and I don't want it sitting there all summer, I need to lift the pallets and clear up the area over summer. I'm of the opinion that the grass is obviously growing so they don't need hay any more..... but in the last week, the number of poos they do has dropped off dramatically. (I'm a saddo who counts so that I know they're getting enough too eat). This could be because spring grass is less fibrous than hay.... but I'm still worried that they're not getting enough to eat! Also, at this time of year, I don't want them to be too fat, with a summer of good grass ahead of them. Has anyone else's horse's poo count dropped? Should I continue to supplement hay? They both seem very happy.
I think it always good to have a few small bales of hay stored all the time. It came in handy when my pony was sectioned off when he injured a leg and a hay net in the field was ideal,or the grass is to lush etc. Their poos wil be less frequent and looser with the new grass through and the reduction of hay.Usually its best to taper off hay gradually and as you say they will soon let you know when they dont want it.I dont think it will be too much of a hardship if they dont have hay , if the weather keeps decent the weight wont be falling off them. You could always supplement with a bucket of chaff and carrots meantime.
 
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