Cruicate and TTA /PRP advice please

SaharaS

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Hi..I know there are a million threads on this but some are a few years back and my brain is too frazzled to read things that might make me panic.

I lost Ursie mid July to sudden cancer she was only 4 and it was almost the anniversary of losing Connie to the exact same cancer 4yrs ago. I'm really struggling.

Within 10 days i find a lump on Bellas stifle..and intermittent lameness. Turns out the lump was just a fatty lipoma but the xrays and work up showed that she has bilateral cruicate degeneration and osteoarthritis. She needs TTA in both knees and then PRP transfusions in them also.
I am struggling emotionally and am unable to speak to my lovely new vet till he is back from holiday the day of her op..31st Aug so Tues next week.

She is a rescue and has separation anxiety to ptsd level. I will as previously be with her till sedated and when she is brought round.
Any advice greatly welcomed please but my main question is how many of you have been thru this and been able to bring your dog home the same day?

She is having one done first, tho unsure which yet. Her movement in the both joints is minimal and hips and spine are good thank God. Left hind is weaker and right has been overcompensating and now probably more compromised. Both the crcl are torn but not full ruptures.
I am moving downstairs with her and trying to source cheap mobility aids and other things as you can probably figure it's ñot been a cheap few months. Is there anything you can recommend...and anything you would do differently if you had to go thru it again. We hope her 8 week xrays post op will mean the 2nd tta can be done soon after.
That wasn't quite as long as it could have been...but thanks for reading. She's 32kg mountain dog type and ...is my world & I'm really frightened

Oh should ad my lovely new vet has special interest in orthopeadics and does listen. He was genuinely amazing with both girls when my old vets really let Ursie down. That's another post for another day...
 

Cinnamontoast

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Jake had a TPL (where they separate the leg) on one knee then another some months later. He was home the same day, we were super careful with the recovery and he made an excellent recovery. I think if you know your vet, they’ll let you be there for the dog coming round etc. I asked for Bear because he comes round in quite a distressed fashion.

Please try not to worry, dogs are ridiculously resilient, Jake stood on the bad leg immediately after his op to pee!

I”m sorry to hear about you losing one to cancer, we just lost Zak to lung cancer, apparently very unusual for dogs. We’re broken, can’t lie.
 

SaharaS

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@Cinnamontoast I am so sorry for your loss.. it's beyond heartbreaking.
Thank you 're your op..that was a nice positive first reply. I didn't know him at all till I called and had word vomit at the poor bloke..but he was incredible and saw us immediately for Ursie and allowed Bella and I in with her. .we had booked to go for investigation the next morning but we were back as o.o.hrs emergency within 2 hrs. Again he allowed me to be there to do it all as calmly as poss and no extra people till she was out just before he operated. I called it a day for her when he rang after the op..I couldn't let her suffer more and there was nothing we could do..again he allowed Bella and I to be there and say goodbye to us both. I know how lucky we were and confident he will hopefully allow her home having seen I do calm incredibly well in emergency(just shocking the rest of the time!)she wouldn't be safe to leave over if i'm not there and worse since losing pup as she's grieving so its worse.it wouldn't be wise or sensible to risk her leg or worse when she freaks out..she didn't even cope being left at home with bf for me to do the horses the eve of sedation and had been displaying bloat symptoms from stressing.. I am glad your boy coped so well that quick.. the fb groups are the other way entirely!
 
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Sandstone1

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A help um up harness may help you in the recovery stage. I used one for my old Gsd. They really help with less mobile dogs. Rest and controlled excercise are important. Lots of chew toys to keep them occupied during recovery. I have known several dogs have this surgery and while it's a big commitment during recovery they normally do very well.
 

SaharaS

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@Sandstone1 thank you..I am ordering a help em up today..I bought a similar one Solvit care lift ..but it's weird..correct size except the leg straps don't fit her behind or the right angle in front.. fluffy bloomers aside. She won't even take a step in it but loved the very similar harness that her physio put on for the water treadmill..I bought her Balto dual jump orthopaedic knee braces too..she took to those like a duck to water..great to hear that it has been a successful op for numerous dogs you know..i just wish we were past the scary bit of both the first 2 ops and on the good end of the journey..and ideally moved home too!
 

deb_l222

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I had Button operated on aged 13. I'll be honest, it wasn't an easy decision at that age but it was surgery or PTS so not much of a choice really.

She had the suture operation for a couple of reasons really. 1. she was less than 20kg and 2. her age meant she didn't need to resume strenuous activity.

She recovered amazingly well and went on to live another three happy years and I only lost her this year aged 16. If I ever had another requiring this type of surgery, I wouldn't hesitate.

One piece of advice I can't stress enough though - you HAVE to stick to the rehab routine like your life depends on it or you may not get the results you want.
 

SaharaS

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I had Button operated on aged 13. I'll be honest, it wasn't an easy decision at that age but it was surgery or PTS so not much of a choice really.

She had the suture operation for a couple of reasons really. 1. she was less than 20kg and 2. her age meant she didn't need to resume strenuous activity.

She recovered amazingly well and went on to live another three happy years and I only lost her this year aged 16. If I ever had another requiring this type of surgery, I wouldn't hesitate.

One piece of advice I can't stress enough though - you HAVE to stick to the rehab routine like your life depends on it or you may not get the results you want.
Thank you...I am so sorry to hear about Button...but 16 is fabulous and that the last 3 were happy ones must be a comfort..they are never here long enough are they.
Grateful 're rehab pointers..yes I have every intention of..I tend to micro manage naturally as it has just worked best for all my recent dogs with complex personalities and reactivity etc so i'm not dreading that part so much..I know her being in pain will be hard but I am.also lucky to have time to prepare and adjust...so that's a blessing many don't have. My only worry for home is getting everything I need in time as it's flying by so fast. And neiggbours cats..since losing pup they seem to be expanding their boundaries and my house has so many levels to access the garden and get ramps.sorted..yesterday we nearly had a flying lesson when one appeared..I literally had to rugby tackle her to stop her launching off the decking(essential access to garden means unavoidable).I was fast enough thank fully but it could have ended badly..luckily it's me that's sore today not her..
 

Bellasophia

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I’ve been through this op twice with my dogue de Bordeaux mastiff.( now passed)

she ruptured her cruciate at age one,slipping on an outdoor tiled floor to chase a cat.
We operated (t.p.l.o.)and she went ahead until three years,when she started limping again.We we’re in USA at this point,but flew her back to italy for the same surgeon to reoperate.
The dog didn’t survive the second surgery,and died the day after.
So,it is a serious operation.

My questions for you are…
how old is your dog? ……..the younger the better.
how heavy is your dog? …..The lighter / smaller ,the better.
how healthy is your dog?….any pre existing conditions will have an impact.
is your dog a stable character?….going into the surgery,recovery etc has its impact….in this situation,”laid back “is a huge plus.

On a positive note ,the first op went well..six weeks of quiet rest.
We didn’t need a crate,the dog slept on a mattress in my lounge ..I slept at her side.
We took the dog outside with a towel sling to give hind end support.
After this,gentle ,on lead walks for getting mobility back.

Truthfully,to go through this twice was a nightmare,but we did it because my girl was just three years old and we had to give her that chance..
Im not going to comment on your dog,because this is your choice..you know your dog,it’s health conditions,and your ability/ funding to see this through..if the vet says yay or nay,I’d press him for answers and be guided by him.
I wish you all the best…it’s not an easy thing to go through with a larger breed and then to have to repeat it is a whole new scenario.



AB10BCF4-A991-47AB-9AEF-419966461226.jpeg
 
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SaharaS

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I’ve been through this op twice with my dogue de Bordeaux mastiff.( now passed)

she ruptured her cruciate at age one,slipping on an outdoor tiled floor to chase a cat.
We operated (t.p.l.o.)and she went ahead until three years,when she started limping again.We we’re in USA at this point,but flew her back to italy for the same surgeon to reoperate.
The dog didn’t survive the second surgery,and died the day after.
So,it is a serious operation.

My questions for you are…
how old is your dog? ……..the younger the better.
how heavy is your dog? …..The lighter / smaller ,the better.
how healthy is your dog?….any pre existing conditions will have an impact.
is your dog a stable character?….going into the surgery,recovery etc has its impact….in this situation,”laid back “is a huge plus.

On a positive note ,the first op went well..six weeks of quiet rest.
We didn’t need a crate,the dog slept on a mattress in my lounge ..I slept at her side.
We took the dog outside with a towel sling to give hind end support.
After this,gentle ,on lead walks for getting mobility back.

Truthfully,to go through this twice was a nightmare,but we did it because my girl was just three years old and we had to give her that chance..
Im not going to comment on your dog,because this is your choice..you know your dog,it’s health conditions,and your ability/ funding to see this through..if the vet says yay or nay,I’d press him for answers and be guided by him.
I wish you all the best…it’s not an easy thing to go through with a larger breed and then to have to repeat it as a whole new scenario.



View attachment 78201
She was very beautiful and I'm so very sorry to hear what happened..that must have been incredibly traumatic. Did you ever know, if it's ok to ask, please don't feel you need to share, i'll understand completely, what exactly it was that she passed from in relation to the surgery? I feel awful asking but I owe it to Bella to ask..

She is 7 we think..absolute worse case 9. No underlying conditions that myself or vet are aware of...and had her since she was between 1 and 2 yrs(2015) she's 32kg and tho not overweight I wouldn't want to see her carry more unless ofcourse it was muscle...fully aware that will be the aim to build but that it will be doing so little for the foreseeable. She is a livestock guardian so while she is incredibly chilled and peaceful, she will react to other dogs but i live avoiding interactions where possible and walk remotely not from home or stables..gixes badgers rabbits, phesants at the farm and cats at home .if they are still no issue other than dogs...but I feel this is very manageable now with forethought and risk assessing like its essential for survival..I do anything I possibly can to ensure every walk is a decompression experience rather than a stressor.

I am obviously worried about GA as she took ages to come round from the sedation but we are I believe using other options this time. I have clarified she will have an anaesthetist overseeing her the entire op...not the surgeon...so that's good..and too.she is not a typical breed for breathing issues I have ensured that she will be incubated through rather than a panic to do so in an emergency, God forbid. My biggest concern would be her staying over as the practice use a camera and night checks but is not live in staff. She would freak out if I am not there so my plan is to only proceed if we can have her 1st into theatre and early as poss and then for me to be there for when she is brought round and to be able to come home the same day when they leave at close of business...with full back up plan for emergency.
I understand TTA is less invasive than tplo and in theory plus with titanium plates the infection risk and complication risk should be lower..I have a zillion questions I have been unable to ask so if infeel anything is contraindicative I simply will not be able to allow it to proceed..equally if she is at all under the weather it won't be happening...
Again I am so sorry your experience wasnt fully positive but grateful for your taking time to share what would have been a hard write.x
 

Bellasophia

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Hi. No problem at all in answering as best I can. Its been a few years now so no worries.
Firstyour dog ,even at seven,probably has a much better chance than a 52kg mastiff ,mollossoid breed on her second op.
The second time around was much longer under a anaesthetic, which worked against her.
I believe my dog had a haematoma..the leg swelled after the op,we were sent home the same day as the op( it was New Year’s Eve in Italy and vet said there would be no overnight supervision)o_O

I slept at her side,saw the leg swelling and repeatedly called the vet,but got no answer.A young vet rolled up the next morning to see the dog..and I told him she’d passed in the night in my arms.The head Vet himself never even phoned me.
They had the gall to charge me again to take her away ,despite paying over 1000 euros the day before for the op.

NB.I doubt this would happen to your dog..so at seven,I’d say you stand a good chance of a good recovery . so GO for it!!:)

The day after the op,the dog will be drowsy after the anaesthetic, so if the vet says leave her there,I would…if there are complications ,they are on hand to deal with them.
You ,meanwhile,will be at home preparing a comfy mattress,a safe area
eg..I’d have a cordoned off pen and /or. a tether near your armchair,with another comfy mattress.
My girl was constipated for five days after her first op ,so give some easily digested ,even soft food( eg hills a/d ) tinned pate for convalescing dogs …a great idea to buy in a few tins.
Gentle walking on lead is the key to recovery..a decompresser as you aptly descibe,I like this description….but absolutely NO JUMPING…neither in or out of the car,on or off settee etc..for as long as possible.
Good luckto you..steel yourself,the best carers are the calm ones…you do your best and it’s the best you can do.
Get some good films lined up and settle in.
Keep in touch and I will follow this post with interest.
 
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SaharaS

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@Bellasophia Thank you for explaining...wanted to reply properly but 3%battery so will be tonight when home...incapable of short &sweet at the best of times🤦🏼‍♀️🤷🏼‍♀️
 

splashgirl45

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my tiny terrier had cruciate surgery and they wanted to keep him overnight as he was still woozy from the GA.. obviously much smaller than yours , recovery was 6 weeks and it was really hard to keep him quiet so he spent a lot of time in his crate, my other terrier was less than a year so i had to keep them apart. he was absolutely fine once the 6 weeks had gone. good luck with yours and so sorry that you have had such a sad time..
 

fiwen30

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Our rough collie cross had a TPLO in February this year, and has made a full recovery. He was 10 years old, approx 20kg, not overweight but not as fit as he could’ve been. He also has a grade 2 heart murmur which he’s been medicated for for about 3 years. We brought him in for surgery in the morning, the op was in the afternoon, and we picked him up the next afternoon.

We had the help of a very good vet physio who visited us at home to help with his rehab, and I scoured the internet for every resource I could find.

The jist is that the recovery & rehab is long & gruelling, but the majority of dogs come completely sound once the process is done properly. You’re looking at at least 12 weeks of initial recovery period.

One of the most crucial aspects is home & behaviour management - no slippy floors (use rugs or yoga mats to cover up flooring), no jumping on furniture or people or in/out of the car, no stairs (we bought a Solvit XL ramp for use on the garden steps & getting in and out of the car boot), no running indoors or outdoors (on-lead for toileting, not allowed any faster than a 4-beat walk), signs on the door so that the mail carriers don’t knock/disconnect the doorbell.

A contained area within the home is very useful. Most crates are far too small, and so we created a pen in the corner of the living room out of metal puppy panels cable tied together, about 6ftx6ft. The flooring was covered in those children’s interlocking play tiles, with vet bed laid on top, and a woollen crate pad for a bed - the area wants to be warm & comfortable, but avoid using deep beds or duvets which can catch on limbs or can be a struggle to get out of. Foam cot mattresses are a nice, cheap bed solution. He spent all of his time in this pen, bar toileting, walks, & physio, for those initial 12 weeks. It helped that I was furloughed, and so spent most of my day either in the pen with him, or on the sofa in the same room. He also got his meals split into snuffle mats & kongs, to keep him occupied, but he mostly slept in between exercise.

The exercise was regimented - we kept a diary, and took weekly videos for the vet & vet physio. We basically followed this week-by-week guide for on-lead exercise & physio activities - https://www.topdoghealth.com/faq/do...tZN_91DSSv2Ic2-17IS7jOL8JkrCtxIZesihyjgGh7vvI We also started water treadmill 3 times a week at the hydrotherapy pool, from I think it was week 6 - week 12, which really helped build his muscle tone without putting too much pressure on his joints.

Some vets still advocate for 12 weeks of strict crate rest and no exercise, but everyone who supported us stressed how important slow, controlled, steadily built up movement was, in order that you don’t get atrophied muscles which cause lots of other problems.

We very gradually built up slow, 4-beat, on-lead pavement walks from 1 x 5 minute walk/day, to 3 x 15 minute walk/day, over the course of those 12 weeks; eventually started adding bursts of 2-beat trots; eventually began sit/stand, lie/stand repetitions, stepping over poles, and stepping up and down very low curbs - all just veeeeery gradual, and paying close attention to how he was coping at each stage. Better too slow than too fast!

Through all of this, and even now, he’s medicated for pain. Again, some vets rush to get them off pain killers a few days after the op, but it’s a really major surgery, and they really need that support from pain medication. I think he was on Pardale & Loxicom, and then was moved onto Gabapentin which he continues to be on.

He wasn’t insured, and so we’re saving like crazy in case his 2nd legs needs operating, but for now he’s been discharged by the vet & vet physio, and we continue to keep a close eye on him. 6 months on, and we can do 30-45 minute walks (longer walks tucker him out due to his heart murmur, his age, and still building his fitness), he can go to the beach, the forest, and have time off-lead too. His fur is mostly grown back in, and you wouldn’t know he’d had a major op. We got rid of the pen around week 16, but still have our floors covered, have a no jumping & no stairs policy, and he doesn’t chase balls or toys anymore, or tug ropes too hard. The ramp comes everywhere with us, and with some positive reinforcement training he took to using it with no problems - we also got a Help Em Up harness for the initial 1st week for lifting him in and out of the boot, and if he needed support when toileting, but he doesn’t enjoy being lifted and prefers to use the ramp for the car.

I’ll include some links below which were very helpful for us, and if you’ve any more questions I’d be happy to help - sorry for the essay, but cruciates are a big topic in our house! I also started my own thread back in February, but I can’t remember how often it got updated.

https://www.topdoghealth.com/faq/do...tZN_91DSSv2Ic2-17IS7jOL8JkrCtxIZesihyjgGh7vvI

https://therehabvet.com/wp-content/..._advice_for_dog_owners_on_crates_and_pens.pdf

https://therehabvet.com/2017/04/room-rest/

https://therehabvet.com/recovering-dogs-advice-for-owners/ - has lots of good links within the post

https://the-balanced-dog.com/2019/10/13/dog-acl-surgery-home-exercises/

https://b585086d-b514-40b9-acad-0ba...d/d149f2_6c3562a3fb90435ba5e0fb6b2e83ebbc.pdf

https://b585086d-b514-40b9-acad-0ba...d/d149f2_1ad0ce30cfe345d0964e57f54e5b76d5.pdf

https://b585086d-b514-40b9-acad-0ba...d/d149f2_9fcda49b2e984cb59636fb6f2cc5e399.pdf
 

SaharaS

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@fiwen30 wow..that's amazing thank you..for each link too..v grateful..

@splashgirl45 thank you also..

Will need to read again when home and reply to everyone properly.. currently just home and frantically trying to diagnose a leaky jaguar which i'm praying will be an easy fix as I need it to behave for Bella...nice and low access and the inside is firm.and supportive..the Land Rover is too high and hard to get her in even with a ramp.(funny door angles)..she doesn't feel as safe in it if given the choice😖
 
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We also had tplo years ago and we brought him to https://tplocity.com/ to get the surgery done. I remember using a sleeve instead of a cone to protect the leg from scratching and licking. We were also thinking of bringing him to rehab because we are afraid that we are not able to take care of him since I have work to do.
 

alibali

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Had a tplo done on a 7 year old 42kg GSD.

She was at vets for 24 hours post surgery in case of complications. She required proper nursing for 48 hours after I got her home and was very poorly.

Very strict about the recovery period, restricting movement and on lead walks only gradually building up time over 3 months. We also bought a dog ramp which she used for the rest of her life. Strictly no jumping or stairs for the 3 months.

Well respected vet said no physio. That's the only thing I regret and would have done differently. She died 5 years later of splenic cancer and had physio for the last 2 years of her life which greatly improved her comfort and mobility and I wish I had started it straight after the op. Her second leg never required treatment.

Good luck, I hope it goes well
 

SaharaS

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Thank you all for you super helpful and very honest and raw replies.. for those of you who have now got rainbow guardian angels, I'm so sorry.. and esp grateful for you sharing.

I'm sorry slow to come back.just been trying to source things for Bella..fix car, get each day done and oh my days..i'm feeling so overwhelmed.with everything.

I've lost my supper 2 nights running just falling asleep in it and not as productive as I would like to say i'd been..but a little progress and a lot nearer next Tues.

We are literally moving downstairs on Sun eve..and my xxxl crate is ready..carpets are ready for our new lounge set up. No post box in door or doorbell so that's easy..front door will have a large burger off notice on it and will barricade the porch off.she doesn't react to the door but curtains to accessible windows are drawn in the day or my skin esp.on my scar get super sore so even quieter.. all her beds are coming down and I have self chilling chilly matts too.a pen and some dismantled xxxl crates to make our new room and to section off furniture..(from bf and Bella).she's very good in the house and very calm with me.. & rarely goes on sofa and does ask..but not worth chancing so done anyway. Gates are.still up from having Ursie and i'm trying to source the remaining bits..comfy cone, hundred ramps.and an all terrain stroller. 🤷🏼‍♀️🤦🏼‍♀️think i might post on here as marketplace and eBay are full of time wasters and deluded crazy price changing messages so far.🙄 we did our third ever hydro yesterday..full tank above chest height.. treadmill moving and her first true go at walking on..60.seconds.from.2 to 3.then 50 seconds at.3.to 6...very pleased indeed! Minimal panting too..and even stood to be 'sponge showered' before meeting her Bernese mountain dog boyfriend quickly afterwards so he could tell her all about his surgeries🐶🐶💕 I also have an RVN who lives a few hundred yards away so she will be on hand if we need anything esp at night and for unloading her. I still feel it would be dangerous to leave her unattended at the vets over night with separation anxiety and no staff on site..to the point it would out way the benefit of having the op..simply not a risk i am prepared to take. It's just me at home and she will have my full attention..other animals will be done before she's collected and trying to find help for the next few days so I won't need to leave her alone.

Right

Pic to follow and i'm struggling to stay awake so panic stations agaiñ tomorrow for kit. Thank you again everyone..it has really helped me prepare...Bella and I are very grateful to you all and your dogs..do habe some equipment q's but not.for this eve as about to stop making sense!💕🐾
 

fiwen30

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What a sweetheart! It’s good that she’s used to the hydro, that will help with her post-op physio, but for now I wouldn’t take her until the op is done. Likewise, I’d be restricting exercise to just on-lead toileting until the op, so as not to cause further damage.

Other things I forgot to mention - you’ll want 2 long ice packs, and 2 long microwaveable wheat bags, as it’s beneficial to use cold & heat therapy on the area for the first few days to control the swelling (if she’ll let you). When the time comes to remove the sticky bandage covering the wound site, use a little vegetable or sunflower oil on some cotton buds to loosen the sticky edges, so it doesn’t pull on their skin.

‘The cone’ is your friend! I know it looks like it makes them miserable, but it is so incredibly vital that it stays on! You can buy or make leg ‘sleeves’ from cut up leggings (plenty of easy tutorials online) with the idea being that if the wound is covered then they won’t lick it. But for the first week or so she may be very sore, and you don’t want to be manouvering her too much, and it’s best to always be able to see the wound to keep an eye for infection, so best not to cover the leg up. You can also get blow up doughnut collars, or soft cones, but I wouldn’t recommend these to use unsupervised as our dog could still reach his knee with these collars on!

We used the hard plastic cone from the vet all day & night for the first 2 weeks even when we were in the room - it only came off for toileting & exercise. As the wound starts to heal, it will start to itch, which will make them want to lick. After those 2 weeks, we took the cone off when we were in the room and had him in our eye line, but as soon as we had to go to the toilet or into the kitchen, the cone went straight back on. They can do an awful lot of damage in a very short amount of time, and the last thing you want is an infection on top of the surgery.

The first week he slept an awful lot, and even the subsequent weeks he still slept an awful lot!

The initial few days post-op will seem dreadful, and you might wonder if you did the right thing, but I promise that they do rally and it will get better. Actually, the most difficult time is around week 5 - they will seem fully healed, begin to get bored of their snail paced walks, will be starting to tire of being penned, and will generally seem fine enough that you might be tempted to let the set in stone rules slide a little. Do not do this! Your dog might think they’re feeling great, because the leg will be starting to stabilise around week 5; but the bone is still nowhere near fully set yet, and any slips, jumps, or running will very easily compromise the joint and require a second surgery and a longer recovery. Just hold your nerve, and keep it sloooowwwww.
 

Sandstone1

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I was just going to post about ice packs, they can help with swelling but obviously cover with a towel or something so not directly on skin. I know you said you are getting a help um up harness which are great but a simple sling made out of a towel or scarf may help to go out for a quick wee for first few days. Make sure vet gives her pain killers! Most dogs do stay at vets overnight but if they dont have staff on site (which is not good) She may well be better off with you. The first few days will be rough but it will get better. The rehab is so important as you already know I am sure. Stuffed kongs and chews to help distract her. She will be uncomfortable and as she looks like a gsd or a cross gsd they are prone to being a little over dramatic so expect her to be quite unhappy for a few days, it will pass though. Try to be calm yourself as she will pick up on your anxiety. Good luck.
 

SaharaS

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Thank you @fiwen30 and @Sandstone1 a quicky post to say ice packs a plenty but microwave free so will be a mini hot water bottle in a thick cover...fully supervised obvs.
I ordered things that haven't turned up cone and ramps and chariot...and 're ordered and now have messages to say delivery mid October.. i'm frantic now and going to post on here in new thread for a lend or cheap etc
Just to ad hydro is in a proper water treadmill not the lake in the pic..and we did our last session this week...vet said 2 weeks after the op we can think about going back..i'll post a few more pics as it's International dog day...
She inherited a ton of kings etc from pup but due to her savage wounds around her mouth and tongue that she arrived with she is very worried about things like that and not a foodie. We can do scent games laid down and she will use a snuffle matt and open parcels quietly..also teaching her a few languages will be a good one..worked a treat for Ursie and Connie who had over 5 each..natural behaviours? No not really other than they enjoyed it and it's mentally exhausting.. frankly being with me probably is too😂 she is a calm soul..she's actually super chilled compared to gsds and completely know what you mean with dramatics with those... she's actually a livestock guardian breed so is great at just being as long as I can ensure no triggers to set her off..but rarely get wildlife in the house thank fully.bf will be banned till I remember to lift the ban........😏 she loves watching gardeners world & garden rescue and animal documentaries so I think it will be ok. .. right..forgotten half of what I wanted to reply...need to remember to eat!🤦🏼‍♀️
 

Sandstone1

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16 July 2010
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5,506
Im not sure you will really need a chariot? She will slowly need her exercise increasing. ie 5 mins 3x daily slowly increasing week by week. From the dogs I have know have this op they would not start hydro until about 6 weeks post op but I would be advised by your vet.
Nina ottason toys are good to help keep brain occupied. You can normally get buster collars from your vet. She will need one as must not lick at her wound.
 

SaharaS

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21 October 2011
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2,146
A little tiny pupdate......i'm utterly shattered from the last 7 week's so will come back with pics and details over the next day or so. Finally able to breath in and out without leaving post it stickies 😅

Bella had her op on Tues morning..I stayed in kennels with her post op as soon as she had come round at 1pm and was able to support her with zoopharmacognosy and homeopathic remedies hourly....was 24.5 degrees so helped me catch up on some much needed sleep in between!

She was on iv fluids till 3, eating at 4 and went for a leg stretch soon after, weight baring nicely so we were discharged at 5 ish tho stayed a bit longer to get full debrief from our lovely vet.

She was bright as a button, had a very comfortable night and slept like a bear cub and had a lie in! no crying at all and was dreaming of running in her sleep!

I'm amazed how well she has coped and so was vet!..she's such a warrior, true to form tho..what ever life throws at you, there is always another way.
Here's a pic from our day glamping at the vets yesterday!
 

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