Cushings lami 18 year old warmblood.

pistolpete

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We are on day two of prascend after Pete came down with laminitis last weekend. He had a mild bout of lami two years ago but not had any symptoms of it prior to that.
I know lami is very serious and that getting the Cushings under control is critical. I guess what I am asking is other peoples experiences of this good and bad. I know I have to give the drugs time to work but he has been through a lot and is in obvious pain despite Bute.
I hope he gives me a clue if it all gets too much for him.
 

Schollym

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Ihave a 36 year old pony on prascend and has been for at least 6 years. She responded well to it and we hadn't had any problems with laminitis since until this year when she wasn't eating her hard feed. Grass had come through and the hay was freshly cut. This meant she couldn't get the Meds into her. We had hid it in carrots,apples etc and she wouldn't eat them if she thought we had tampered with them. We went through a stage of sprinkling it on her dinner until she came in full. She now has it crumbled up in custard and squirted into her mouth using a syringe. ( vets advice) your horse will need a yearly blood test to check levels and the dose will be adjusted accordingly. It gave her a new lease of life previously we kept having bouts of laminitis.
 

Surreydeb

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There is a good FB group, Equine Cushings Disease Horses with lots of people who have lots of experience to share. I'm finding it really useful after my pony was recently diagnosed.
 

gingerarab

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I have a 30yr old arab that has not had lami but tested positive for cushings, all I can say is that in 2 weeks of taking the drug he has improved so much and he now is back to his 20 yr old self. Keep up with it ! I am amazed at the difference.
 

ameeyal

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I had a horse come down with really bad laminitis years ago despite being a fit endurance horse, he tested positive for cushings, i tried to manage him the best i could { my horses live out} but he couldnt tolerate grass for more than 2 hours a day, so it was no life for him so i had him pts. A month ago my other old pony had very early signs of laminitis, so i had him tested and it came back positive, hes on 1/2 tablet a day which seems to be working i havent changed his routine, he lives out on a track system, i check his pulses twice a day if a feel hes not right i will put a muzzle on him, i will not stable him just to control the laminitis as he just wants to be out with his mates. but its early days yet, just like your horse.
 

SusieT

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Personally for me if my elderly horse was still in obvious pain a week on I would be re evaluating his pain meds or considering euthanasia- sorry. It's a condition they will be prone to and is very painful so I would be evaluating closely.
 

meleeka

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Personally for me if my elderly horse was still in obvious pain a week on I would be re evaluating his pain meds or considering euthanasia- sorry. It's a condition they will be prone to and is very painful so I would be evaluating closely.
A week is very early days for laminitis. Most people who have dealt with the condition will do their best to make sure it doesn't happen again. It's not inevitable.

My mare is on Prascend and it's been fabulous for her. I thought she was just getting old, but since I started treatment she's found a new lease of life. Apart from being more fussy about which hard feed she eats, she's pretty much normal.
 

AdorableAlice

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A week is very early days for laminitis. Most people who have dealt with the condition will do their best to make sure it doesn't happen again. It's not inevitable.

My mare is on Prascend and it's been fabulous for her. I thought she was just getting old, but since I started treatment she's found a new lease of life. Apart from being more fussy about which hard feed she eats, she's pretty much normal.
Absolutely, I have a 17.2 23 yr old gelding on prescend. He tested positive at 19, no symptoms at all. Given his size I am very careful with his diet.
 

JillA

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The key to dealing with lammi caused by any underlying condition is x rays and a good hoof professional.
Mine was in this position over a year ago, and what matters and what you have to treat is what has happened to the internal bones, which is why x rays are essential. Then you can assess what sinkage or rotation is presenting and provide the support needed to stop any further movement.
This is the first aid stage - Styrofoam pads, box rest on deep supportive bedding and boots and pads are ideal.
Then when the inflammation has gone (bute is anti inflammatory, not simply pain relief) rehabilitation is the name of the game, and for that, the ideal is a good podiatrist plus the boots and pads for ongoing support while the laminae heal enough to begin to support the bony column again. Shoeing at that stage masks any problems, although heartbars can supply support (a decent farrier will need x rays anyway so you really do have to get them) getting bare feet in to really good shape has statistically a much better outcome.
Deal with the lammi, the Prascend will be dealing with the cause. Good information on here http://www.thelaminitissite.org/ (they also run a Facebook page) , far far better IMHO than the Laminitis Trust which is a bit outdated and advocates shoes.
Mine is now 100% sound and back in work at the age of 19.
 
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Micky

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As Jilla has written....mine has been on prascend for 3/4 years now..X-rays balanced feet correct diet turnout with or without muzzle and eventually work..give it time, he will come right....it is worrying but it is just case of tweaking his management..good luck
 

Pinkvboots

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X rays being done today.
you will know more once X ray's are done I will keep fingers crossed for good news.

my story did not have a happy ending I am afraid I had a warmblood mare that had cushings and ems and was retired due to an injury, she went down with laminitis last may being that she was a big heavy girl she really did not want to stand up but she did improve after about a week she was on a lot of bute for about a month, she was doing really well was coming out onto the yard for a bit and was looking really good by the end of July and suddenly she just went down with another bout, and she hadn't even been on any grass and I just couldn't see her in so much pain again so I let her go.

hopefully your horse has had just a mild attack and catching it early helps so much limiting the damage, you will know so much more after the X rays I have seen one horse come back to ridden work after having a year off from laminitis and almost being pts 3 times so it's not always doom and gloom please let us know how you get on.
 

pistolpete

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X-rays clear! No rotation. He is moving better but obviously still sore. Some scouring as a result of Prascend. On protexin for a few days to see if it's transient. Washed his stinky pooey legs! It must be love!
 
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