Dog Neutering

Persephone

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A friend is looking to have her dog neutered and has been quoted £160 by her vets.

Does this sound average for a 60 lb dog?

Does anyone know of any deals or anything that might be available for neutering via charities etc?
 

Alec Swan

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If you acquire a dog, then you take on the responsibility of that dog. Will a charity also help with feeding the animal?

£160? That sounds reasonable, and in the case of your friend, then I'd say pay up, or leave the animal entire.

Alec.
 

Persephone

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I agree entirely Alec. Just asking the question on her behalf. I have seen the odd offer on neutering by the charities which I thought were open to anyone, but for cost, as it were?

I don't do dogs, is it ok to leave them entire?
 

Umbongo

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Sounds like a fair price to me.
I know of vouchers from charities to be spent with them or other vets but as far as I am aware they are given out on a means tested basis. They will normally want proof you are on a low income. But I have only known a few people with these so not sure if it depends on the charity?
 

Persephone

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She is on a very low income. Thankfully the dog is insured for other bills, but obviously it won't cover neutering. She didn't expect the cost to be quite so much.
 

paisley

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I'm fairly sure the Blue Cross offer reduced cost neutering if you are on a low income/on benefits? The price quoted is very dependant on the dogs weight (anaesthetic needed), so I paid about £90 but it was a 15kg whippet!
 

Persephone

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Oh thankyou! I will pass that on :) It's something x those white ones that look like a cloud. Definitely not any kind of bulldog or staffordshire thing. He looks like a long haired Jack Russell really, with longer legs. He is a nice nature and always under control so maybe he would be fine to stay entire :)
 

dingle12

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Dogs trust will give you a voucher if on a low income, you only pay £30 towards it. They also offer free micro chipping. I would get his bits off reduces problems later on in life.
 

twiggy2

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Dogs trust will give you a voucher if on a low income, you only pay £30 towards it. They also offer free micro chipping. I would get his bits off reduces problems later on in life.

free micro chipping is available to everyone in the Uk via the dogs trust, you just need to find a vet that has registered with them to offer it.

£160 sounds about right for a 60lb dog but a jack russell type dog with long legs would not weigh that much
 

Dobiegirl

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I think one thing for sure is you need to ring around all your local vets, prices vary considerably, we have a vet comparison site in Bristol on fb and its proving a bit of an eye opener, my dog trainer is on there and he is registered with quite a few vets purely for the cost. I didnt know you could do that but will do the same myself now.
 

Dizzle

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When I had my dog done I phoned around, my usual vets wanted about £140 but I found another vet nearer to home with a good reputation that would do it for £80 (10kg dog). I have my dog registered with 4 different vets so I can shop around for price on routine treatments.
 

SusieT

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Dizzle- did you ask what the difference was for the cost?
At 80 my bet is no nurse constantly monitoring, probably not a sterile theatre? Probably works out ok most of the time but if it doesn't these things become important.
 

thewonderhorse

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A friend is looking to have her dog neutered and has been quoted £160 by her vets.

Does this sound average for a 60 lb dog?

Does anyone know of any deals or anything that might be available for neutering via charities etc?

I would say that that is a fairly good price for a large breed.

Neutering reduces health issues (like testicular cancer) later in life and in my opinion is a no brainer for responsible pet owners.
 
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TrasaM

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I would say that that is a fairly good price for a large breed.

Neutering reduces health issues (like testicular cancer) later in life and in my opinion is a no brainer for responsible pet owners.

Someone posted an article on Facebook recently which suggested it was linked to cancers in dogs..especially bone cancers ? Can't find it at the moment though ..
 

Alec Swan

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.......

Neutering reduces health issues (like testicular cancer) later in life and in my opinion is a no brainer for responsible pet owners.

Someone posted an article on Facebook recently which suggested it was linked to cancers in dogs..especially bone cancers ? ........ ..

There is research which implies that the risk of bone cancer, specifically in greyhounds, though they may have been the breed targeted by the researchers, is greatly increased, following castration. There's no question that castration of dogs is a double edged sword, and far from being an obligation of responsible owners, there may very well be an implied risk. I'd also point out that there are those countries, Norway I suspect and possibly Germany, where sterilisation as a convenience, is viewed as mutilation, and is illegal without sound medical reasons.

Alec.
 

thewonderhorse

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There is research which implies that the risk of bone cancer, specifically in greyhounds, though they may have been the breed targeted by the researchers, is greatly increased, following castration. There's no question that castration of dogs is a double edged sword, and far from being an obligation of responsible owners, there may very well be an implied risk. I'd also point out that there are those countries, Norway I suspect and possibly Germany, where sterilisation as a convenience, is viewed as mutilation, and is illegal without sound medical reasons.
Alec.

Yes but we are not in Germany or Norway (who kill whales btw?!)and to say that castration is mutilation is, in my opinion, insane.

For me, the benefits far out way the negatives and I would always castrate and spey my animals.
 

twiggy2

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There is research which implies that the risk of bone cancer, specifically in greyhounds, though they may have been the breed targeted by the researchers, is greatly increased, following castration. There's no question that castration of dogs is a double edged sword, and far from being an obligation of responsible owners, there may very well be an implied risk. I'd also point out that there are those countries, Norway I suspect and possibly Germany, where sterilisation as a convenience, is viewed as mutilation, and is illegal without sound medical reasons.

Alec.

I would be very interested to see the research Alec, I feel it may have more to do with the fact Greyhounds are prone to cancer full stop. they are not castrated till they leave the track and at that point they are more mature in years and the cancer is more likely to be an issue-possible the stresses associated with the drastic change in lifestyle for the dogs when coming off the track may have something to do with it too?
 

Cinnamontoast

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I would say that that is a fairly good price for a large breed.

Neutering reduces health issues (like testicular cancer) later in life and in my opinion is a no brainer for responsible pet owners.

Really? Many studies are now saying it's a balance and not necessarily the best thing for health (read the first study I posted)

Someone posted an article on Facebook recently which suggested it was linked to cancers in dogs..especially bone cancers ? Can't find it at the moment though ..

Springfeather? I'll pop it up in a sec. http://www.angryvet.com/spaying-and-neutering/
 
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TrasaM

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Hi cinnamontoast .. Wasn't the same article but saying the same think..it also suggested that unwanted births could be sorted by sterilising as opposed to castration and spaying.. Seems like a sensible solution and less traumatic to the animal than the alternative.
 

Dizzle

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No one bats an eyelid if you say you're getting a horse cut!

I had my dog snipped because he kept... well lets just say he learned to do something Prince is rumoured to have had ribs removed so he could do, no chance of stopping him as he would only do it when alone!
 

TrasaM

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No one bats an eyelid if you say you're getting a horse cut!

I had my dog snipped because he kept... well lets just say he learned to do something Prince is rumoured to have had ribs removed so he could do, no chance of stopping him as he would only do it when alone!

OOOOH. :eek: :D :D I take it were not talking about Prince the dog here :D
 
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