Don't know what to do

ClassicG&T

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 September 2011
Messages
1,244
Location
Here, there and everywhere
Since my other thread was taken down I'll try from this angle....

I've got a 6y/o TB x Welsh whom I've had for about 2 years now.
We've progressed schooling wise and starting to pop him over some poles and he's enjoying it an showing potential.
However, hacking out on his own can be a night mare as he naps for Britian and it's getting to a point now where hacking out is a chore as 9/10 there's an argument. Also I took him Xc schooling for an open day and he really gave me a shock pratting around as he was napping to other horses and lorries. He went up a few times so I called it a day as It really knocked me.
Took him back today when it would just be him on course and, although we started out well, he started to get naughty and napping again. I was a bit all over the place with the jumps as I didn't get him flowing round and kept stopping and starting so he maybe got a bit confused but he really started napping again so I gave him a crack and he dumped me ☺️

I'm at a loss as to what to do with this napping thing as it's been 2 years I've had him now and even at home going down th lane out of sight of other horses he starts up and it's just a battle now

His schooling however I've had no problem and really enjoying riding him then. I don't want to let him go as he has real potential to be a super star but I'm starting to get at my wits end with him. I know he's just young but after 2 years of bein told not to do something he still does it.

I could like to send him off for some training but parents don't want to fund it (still at home as starting Uni in sept).

Just need some advice as to what I should do or just let him go to someone else as really, ridden and on the ground he is a mans horse.
 

DD265

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 April 2013
Messages
761
Firstly have you had his teeth/back/tack checked? How are his feet? Any unsoundness?

What is he like if you lead him out in hand, does he still nap then? How do you feel when you're riding him outside of the arena/field where you school? Is it possible that he's picking up on your feelings? Is there somebody that can walk out with you? What is he like if you hack in company? Do you have an experienced friend who could try hacking him down the lane?

Has he always napped? How do you feel about him right now? Are you feeling objective or emotional? i.e. if you slept on it would you feel better and more prepared to go through this journey tomorrow? Do your parents understand the danger of his behaviour and how much it is reducing your enjoying/has the potential to knock your confidence?

Sorry that's a billion questions :)
 

ClassicG&T

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 September 2011
Messages
1,244
Location
Here, there and everywhere
Hi thanks for replying!

He has had every medical profession out under the sun as that's what I went through first. Everything that needed sorting with him has now been sorted.
He was always napped when leaving or away from other horses. At first I admit I was expecting it but now I'm not worried/nervous so he shouldn't be picking anything up there.

He is a role model horse when hacking out with others. Going to get instructor on tomorrow to see if he naps with her. No one to walk with me, and to be honest I don't want anyone as i feel I should be able to get him out with out some one. He is fine with me leading him in hand and I often do do road work in hand up the hill

I think that's everything answered! :)
 

Gloi

Too little time, too much to read.
Joined
8 May 2012
Messages
11,073
Location
Lancashire
If it were me I'd do a lot of work in long reins and tackle it while I was on the ground.
 

dogatemysalad

Well-Known Member
Joined
22 July 2013
Messages
6,118
Never do anything that is going to end in a battle. It compounds the horse's mindset. Work on doing things that he is good at and introduce confidence boosting goals that increase his boldness. Forget the solo hacking etc and hack in company and if possible take him adventuring in different areas, over as much different terrain and sights as you reasonably can. Challenge him in situations where he most comfortable and get him used to problem solving. Using his brain before engaging his flight response.
He's young and concentrating on building on achievable goals will increase his trust in you and your leadership. Given a reprieve from the tasks he can't cope with will help, so that in time, he will be in a better position to be successful without the battle.

Sometimes though, rider and horse just don't click but if you're a partnership in the school, can't see why you can't both get there in the end.
 

Gloi

Too little time, too much to read.
Joined
8 May 2012
Messages
11,073
Location
Lancashire
If you have something that naps hard and tends to spin I don't tend to put the reins through anything as then if there is a real problem the horse can just come round in a circle on one line. If they go through something and the horse manages to spin on you you can get in the nasty position of the horse facing you and running backwards because the lines are from the bit through the roller pulling back on its mouth as you try to hold on to it. Once you are confident it's behaving, that's when I put them through the roller.
 

TarrSteps

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 January 2007
Messages
10,891
Location
Surrey
If you have something that naps hard and tends to spin I don't tend to put the reins through anything as then if there is a real problem the horse can just come round in a circle on one line. If they go through something and the horse manages to spin on you you can get in the nasty position of the horse facing you and running backwards because the lines are from the bit through the roller pulling back on its mouth as you try to hold on to it. Once you are confident it's behaving, that's when I put them through the roller.

I would agree. But I would also say, neither you nor the horse has long reined before, on the road with a napping horse is probably not the place to perfect your skills!

I would also say of course he will be reluctant with your trainer (I'm not that keen on "napping" because he connotation is the horse is doing it to be "difficult" but in fact that is rarely the case. There is also no "one size fits all" cure for this - or any - behaviour because they are symptoms/expressions.) but it's what your trainer feels and does that is the useful part of the equation. He/she may very well tell you there are holes in the horse's training and should also tell you how to address them. He/she may tell you the horse is uncomfortable in some way. Don't look at it as punishment for the horse's behaviour with you or some test for him or you, look at it as a way for you and your instructor to gain more information about the situation.
 
Last edited:

windand rain

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 November 2012
Messages
8,517
A bit confused you really need some professional help and as you are home and funded by parents I would have thought they would have more interest in your safety. It will be cheaper in the long run for them to get it sorted and you to be safe and happy or aware he is too much for you and get him rehomed and maybe a different one if that is best for you. Have you actual asked your parents and do they know how bad it is
If you have to do it yourself then get a good instructor to advise you even if it is only a one off with tips and ideas once they have actually seen what the horse is doing
 

madeperfectly007

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 April 2011
Messages
95
Location
Essex
Hi OP,

Sorry to hear about your situation!

I've recently been changing the way I work with my horse after reading Enlightened Equitation and researching more about natural horsemanship. My pony suffers a lot from separation anxiety and will nap and call when he's separated. I found that doing join up work and aiming to be more like a leader has helped dramatically! Generally spending more time with him has helped a lot too. he now sees me as someone to follow and someone that will keep him safe so he's not bothered where the other horse are.

Hope things helps 😄
 

ClassicG&T

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 September 2011
Messages
1,244
Location
Here, there and everywhere
Thanks for the replies!
I think I do need to re address the ground work and bonding and start from the beginning.
Long reined him now the lane and bless him he was pretty good by the time we got going properly :)
 

AmyMay

Situation normal
Joined
1 July 2004
Messages
65,655
Location
South
You said in your other post that he had previously had a problem with a hindleg which resulted in surgery. What was the problem?
 

ClassicG&T

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 September 2011
Messages
1,244
Location
Here, there and everywhere
It was damaged hind high suspensories when I bought him. Had an opp on both legs that destroyed casing around high suspensories to ease pressure and allow them to expand. I've had vet out several time throughout his progress back into work and she is happy with his soundness and he feels fab, hasn't bothered him since.
 

L&M

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 March 2008
Messages
6,371
Location
up a hill
Sell him and get a horse that suits your needs more......sorry if I sound brutal but horse ownership is too expensive and time consuming for it not to be to be fun.

Or be prepared to pay for professional help before you get hurt.
 

Templebar

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 July 2012
Messages
462
Just out of curiosity, what is happening to him when you go to uni?

I would probably say sell. You are going to be busy at uni and guessing that its your first year although i do not know where you are going, freshers year is manic, everyone doesn't just go home at the weekend that's when a lot of the clubs/sports and other activities go on. It is not fair on either of you to expect him to be happy with you at weekends or if he isn't far then an hour each day. He will still need a lot of work and even without the napping would require more than an hour here or there.

Having been there and kept horses while at uni and mine is a lot older and i didn't live at uni, its hard you miss out on a lot of stuff with them. I bred my own youngster and now in final year im just backing her and hope to do a lot more in the summer onwards. I would suggest you sell before anyone gets hurt and offer to ride someone elses for the summer to get your confidence back. If you still think you can keep one while at uni then get something a bit more been there and done it that you can have fun with and preferably live out so wont need exercise everyday.
 

Holly Hocks

Well-Known Member
Joined
1 March 2010
Messages
5,402
Location
England
If you have something that naps hard and tends to spin I don't tend to put the reins through anything as then if there is a real problem the horse can just come round in a circle on one line. If they go through something and the horse manages to spin on you you can get in the nasty position of the horse facing you and running backwards because the lines are from the bit through the roller pulling back on its mouth as you try to hold on to it. Once you are confident it's behaving, that's when I put them through the roller.

Exactly this. I had a napper (note the word "had") and long reined her initially with roller. It was awful. I took the roller off and immediately had more control and was able to send her forwards. I went bloody miles with that horse. Doesn't nap now though.
 

ClassicG&T

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 September 2011
Messages
1,244
Location
Here, there and everywhere
Staying at home for Uni so Uni not really a problem as such. Problem is though I'm in USA for 3 months from June so he'd just be out in field unless I got instructor up every now and again to have a sit on him.
 

Pearlsasinger

Up in the clouds
Joined
20 February 2009
Messages
44,457
Location
W. Yorks
No one to walk with me, and to be honest I don't want anyone as i feel I should be able to get him out with out some one. He is fine with me leading him in hand and I often do do road work in hand up the hill

Sorry but I think that's a bit of a daft attitude. The only thing you 'should' be doing is what works to get him out happily on his own. You do have someone who could walk with you - your RI.
However, if he walks out well in hand, my advice is to tack him up, lead him out on a short circular route and when almost back at the yard get on and ride him home. When he can do that well increase the distance you ride until you are able to ride the whole route. Remember that he is 'napping' because of a lack of confidence, not because he is being naughty, and you are working on building his confidence in small steps. Don't worry about what other people will think about you walking alongside him when he is tacked up. If they are critical, it is because they are numpties who do not understand how horses' minds work.
 

unicornystar

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 February 2014
Messages
377
Location
OXON
From owning the most nappy sharp horse in the world, the only advice I can give IS....being HONEST....if it is getting worse and you are losing confidence, either sell to someone who can deal with the napping and improve it, or get someone who can assist you. However, if it has got worse, clearly the horse isnt respecting you and trying it on more and more....

This is not meant to sound horrible but having seen so many horses take the pee out of people, it's the only sensible way to go if your confidence is diminishing.

I kept on with mine for several years, did long reining, that was fun! took the dog out with us, walked a lot of miles in between stops just to keep horse moving forward, stopped mid xc many times and stood there for the hell of it. It never was "cured" but it did get better and this took an awful lot of work and guts and stickability!!! Not that I am brave, more stupid as I adored the horse, but seriously, if you are getting put off by rearing or bucking, time to get yourself something else that you can trust that trusts you.

Mine wouldnt even leave the yard, it took over a year's worth of ground work, hacking with friends, to progressing on our own....it would even nap on the way back INTO the yard!!!!

He's no longer with us due to kissing spines affecting him badly but in the early days this was not related to his napping, he napped when he was racing as a youngster!!!

Never worry about what others think, they are not dealing with the horse, you are, I used to get looks just buckarooing out of my old yard, in a bed to get him moving on!!! If you have had him checked by vets and it is not a pain issue, seriously consider your options as it is not fun and can be dangerous.....

xx
 
Top