equine sports massage therapy as a career

Joined
11 April 2014
Messages
8
Hi everyone, wondering if anyone can give me some advice. Iv worked on and off with horses since i was 17. (Im now nearly 27.) Due to money issues (poor pay and prospects with horses) I have worked in an office for the past 18 months. Im at a point where I want to decide on a career once and for all and go to college and get some qualifications. Super sensible me wants to go into accounting (plenty of jobs, good route to progress and well paid so I can compete my own horses.) Horsey me as always dreamt of being a physio. However university isnt an option but you can get into it by qualifying as a equine sports massage therapist first. (Trust me its true, iv spoken to the relevant courses and I would be recognised by insurance company's and vets.) However I would also need to come up with 8k for course fees :(. I am also sceptical at this point that I would be able to make money at this route even though every physio i know seems to be doing pretty well for themselves,(and they are not apcat physios,just for the record). The uncertainty of being self employed is terrifying to me. It seems a lot of people want to work in this area, so surely its going to get to a point where its impossible to make a good living ?!?! Im so torn. Money is important to me, I dont want to struggle.. But I also dont want to wake up miserable 10 years from now thinking I made all the wrong decisions and didnt follow my dreams. Ahhh what to do. What is a standard salary for a self employed sports massage therapist or a physio?
 

wkiwi

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Joined
30 March 2015
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838
Location
Wales
I think it would depend on whether there were many others in your area. It is certainly the fashion at the moment to get a physio for just about every problem in existence, but i would be worried if during a recession it would be sustainable to the same extent?
Also, are you prepared to chase clients and promote yourself (not everyone likes doing this) and not have regular holidays/ paid sick leave etc.?
Don't want to be doom and gloom, but i always think if you look at the negative aspects and work out a plan to cope then you can make a more rational decision.
I would do the accountancy and save money to do the physio later, then you would have both strings to your bow! (and you could offer a combined package for racehorse trainers/big yards etc.).
 
Joined
11 April 2014
Messages
8
Rationally I think the accounting is a better idea. I just constantly find myself looking into the whole sports massage thing. I would be looking into qualifying as a human sports massage therapist as well as horses. So I could treat both horse and rider. Maybe work part time with people then fit horses in too? Im not sure how it would work. It would be interesting if anyone on here actually does this for a living so I could get some kind of realistic salary expectation. :/
 

pippixox

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Joined
9 April 2013
Messages
1,860
Not exactly the same, but this acedemic year I have been doing a level 5 diploma in sports massage and soft tissue therapy (humans) so just the level below a degree. Finals this month. It’s been a lot of work- while I look after my toddler, horses and work part time as a carer (oh and I’m pregnant) but I could not afford a full time course. Still cost over £2000 for the year.

Prospects wise I have built a base of possible clients as had to do 100 hours practise with volunteers. You can charge about £40-50 an hour once qualified I’ve met numerous previous students as many earn extra doing training weekends with the main trainers. Some do work full time and do ok but plenty will have a second job for a few years as takes time and a lot of work to build up enough clients. Also you can’t physically massage a 40 hour week. So it isn’t 40x40. Plus with horses you will have to travel a lot more.

I completely understand not wanting to be in a job you hate, but a job that is stimulating may actually mean you struggle to find time and money to enjoy your horse.
 
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