fibrotic myopathy

justin

New Member
Joined
1 October 2005
Messages
5
my 15 year old connemara X has been diagnosed with a fibrotic myopathy. He had an accident in a ditch 18months ago and has fully recovered except for this lump on his 'buttock' which restricts the final inches of his hind leg movement and gives rise to a sort of stamping action. everything else is OK and he is almost totally sound in trot but in walk this persists in spite of endless chiropraction, massage, supplements etc. The Vets say that operating would be risky and he is too old to put through gen anaesthetic. Has anyone released this lump or solved a similar problem and if so how?
s <span style="color:blue"> </span>
 
Joined
16 April 2006
Messages
1,028
Location
mostly UK
Ah Ha! Run the following past your vet and see what he/she says:

What you have here is a REAL tangible problem that can't be made to look like its gone away when it hasn't and probably requires some restructuring of connective tissue so it won't go away by itself. Quackery works on illusion, to make you think something has improved when it hasn't or by taking advantage of the fact that something will get better on its own. So I suggest to you that no amount of chiropracty, massage, supplements, sacrificing goats, voodoo, magnetic ear-muffs will have the slightest effect on this condition. Ask your vet if effectively what you have is analogous to a scar which may in the long term slowly get resorbed naturally but will otherwise persist regardless of treatement other than surgical intervention. Its sort of useful to your bank balance to hear your vet say this if they believe it.
 

Ginn

New Member
Joined
24 November 2005
Messages
4,002
My friend has an exracer with this condition as the result of being kicked in the field. He is almost always hoping lame for the first 1 1/2 hours of ridden work and will only start to feel sounded after a very long warm up and really asking him to step under when you work him - even then he is never truely sound but its not due to pain - just restriction. When you firmly run your fingers down his buttock muscles you can feel where the tissue is damaged but no amount of massaging appears to improve his soundness. Sorry - not really much help but long, gentle warm-ups do seem to improve his apparent soundness
 
Joined
22 March 2006
Messages
167
Location
Ceredigion, Wales
If you can get hold of an Equissage, I would definitely give it a go. It won't resolve the problem overnight and will take lots of treatments but I would be very surprised if it didn't resolve the problem.

Case history - friend of mine was knocked over by a horse she was leading in from the field and he then stood on her thigh leaving a huge bruise and a lovely hoof print! The bruise eventually went but left a huge lump that the doctor referred her to physio for. There was no improvement after several months of treatment and surgery was thought to be the only option. After already having had the surgery option on another, unrelated oedema previously and having lost the feeling in that area due to nerves being damaged during the op, she decided to invest in an Equissage hand unit and give that a go - could always sell it on if it didn't work! After a couple of treatments the hard lump started to soften, no visible difference in size but at least it was loosening. After a couple of months, the huge hard lump that she had for about 12 months had gone with no surgery and no loss of feeling.

Basically the moral of this story is, a vet or doctor cannot definitely say, without operating and looking at the damaged area, that the problem isn't caused by a hidden oedema or similar, that has set and is therefore causing restriction in the affected muscle and an Equissage can work deeper than any human hands can.
 
Top