First horse silly questions!!!

Joined
17 November 2019
Messages
7
No judgements please
My whole life I have wanted my own horse but upto until now it has never been a consideration due to finances.
I’m now at a stage in life where I THINK I can afford one Of my own but I just don’t know where to start.
I have had various part loans. I work full time and do occasional funny shifts. I wouldn’t be able to afford full livery.
I am hoping to go grass livery or diy. I have some questions
I would be looking for a horse that is hardy enough to cope with grass livery mainly
So my questions are:
On grass livery:
How many times a day would I need to visit?
Is the horse more susceptible to illnesses?
What are the monthly expenses other than livery cost?
Can they live out in the extreme winter conditions or am I best to find somewhere with a stable?

diy:
What time would I need to be up the yard to turn out and what time would they normally come back in?

sorry if they are silly questions but I have some more...

do all horses have to be vaccinated? I’ve found a possible pony that I’ve been told is quite hardy and low maintenance but my only concern is that the lady said he is not vaccinated as she doesn’t compete? Is this right?

can someone lift the rough monthly expenses of a grass/ diy livery?

Any help would be muchly appreciated
 

Ambers Echo

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Joined
13 October 2017
Messages
4,583
I am hoping to go grass livery or diy. I have some questions

I would be looking for a horse that is hardy enough to cope with grass livery mainly
So my questions are:
On grass livery:
How many times a day would I need to visit?
Is the horse more susceptible to illnesses?
What are the monthly expenses other than livery cost?
Can they live out in the extreme winter conditions or am I best to find somewhere with a stable?

diy:
What time would I need to be up the yard to turn out and what time would they normally come back in?

do all horses have to be vaccinated? I’ve found a possible pony that I’ve been told is quite hardy and low maintenance but my only concern is that the lady said he is not vaccinated as she doesn’t compete? Is this right?

can someone lift the rough monthly expenses of a grass/ diy livery?

Any help would be muchly appreciated
Grass livery can also be DIY livery so I assume you mean DIY Grass livery or DIY livery that includes a stable?

Prices vary drastically but in my area (North West) grass livery is £20 pw and DIY with stable is £30. A bale of haylage costs £50 and lasts my 3 about 10 days. But I feed them a lot. If you have a hardly native type they may need a lot less.

Grass livery you may be able to go up once a day assuming a constant water supply and enough forage (ie a daily field check in summer but more in winter). A horse stabled overnight needs 2 visits a day - morning and evening. Some yards have rules about how early and late horses can go out/come in and others don't so you would need to ask.

Horses are fine out 24/7/365 assuming you have enough land to cope. Horses trash land like you would ot believe! They would need hay in winter in the field which not all YOs allow.

Horses don't HAVE to be vaccinated if they are not competed but they are still at risk of flu which is air borne. And spreads through the unvaccinated population. So I would vaccinate on health grounds even if I did not compete. But you could do that anyway.

Other costs: trimming or farriery, worming, insurance, vet bills for under excess issues, forage, possibly feed/supplements, vaccinations, bedding, rugs, yard equipment and replacements. If you have an unclipped hardy native living out naked 24/7/365 who never gets ill or injured then it can be very cheap. If you have one in at night, that is clipped for work, trashes rugs a lot, has shoes on, needs feed to stay healthy and has a run of poor health or injuries etc then costs add up.

The most important thing for a new owner is to be on a yard with support. And to take knowledgeable help with you to buy your first horse.
 

Kat

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Joined
25 January 2008
Messages
11,865
Location
Derbyshire
I would suggest looking for a DIY yard that gives you the ability to pay for extra services so that if you are working a funny shift or on holiday you have cover available.

Many of your questions depend upon the yard you are going to so ask around locally for yards and ask about their rules.

I wouldn't necessarily be put off an unvaccinated horse but I would get it vaccinated asap. If you aren't competing you don't need to worry about following the vaccination schedule so closely but a tetanus vaccine is essential as tetanus is awful but your vet can advise how frequently you need it. Personally I vaccinate for flu and wouldn't put my horse at risk by not doing, many yards require you to vaccinate too.
 

Dyllymoo

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Joined
22 November 2013
Messages
870
No judgement at all but I do feel that if you are already trying to find places to save money then it might not be quite the right time for a horse right now.

I think what you need to look at are the average monthly costs of a horse. Livery (grass or DIY) will be part of that but there are so many other things that you need to consider like hay, feed, farrier, insurance (vets fees are not cheap), worming, rugs etc.

I would speak to some livery yards in your area and ask for prices. Our DIY yard is just that, DIY. We do everything ourselves, and are expected to go up at least twice a day. We can however pay for extra services such as bring in, turn out, muck out etc.

I think this would be the starting point for me, and then I would look at the other costs as detailed above and seriously think about if it is financially viable :)
 
Joined
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Messages
20,500
Please vaccinate for tetanus! It really is essential IMO. Flu is sensible to vaccinate for.

My horses live out and I wouldn't be happy to check only once a day. Twice a day is better, but maybe you could share checks with another livery or pay the YO to check on days that you cannot make it due to an awkward shift (so assisted livery)?

I have attached a photo of my horses a while back when we had lots of snow. They were fine out as you can see. They have a windbreak for shelter (natural shelter eg a big hedge is fine too) to get out of the worst of the weather and a hay feeder as the pic shows. The hay feeder has hardcore around it which helps get them out of the mud when it is awful. The DIY livery yard I was on previously had a similar set up and the YO added the cost of the hay onto our bill. It worked very well.
 

Attachments

Joined
17 November 2019
Messages
7
No judgement at all but I do feel that if you are already trying to find places to save money then it might not be quite the right time for a horse right now.

I think what you need to look at are the average monthly costs of a horse. Livery (grass or DIY) will be part of that but there are so many other things that you need to consider like hay, feed, farrier, insurance (vets fees are not cheap), worming, rugs etc.

I would speak to some livery yards in your area and ask for prices. Our DIY yard is just that, DIY. We do everything ourselves, and are expected to go up at least twice a day. We can however pay for extra services such as bring in, turn out, muck out etc.

I think this would be the starting point for me, and then I would look at the other costs as detailed above and seriously think about if it is financially viable :)
Thank you for that info! I have written out the monthly costs for everything else it’s just I was getting a bit confused by different types of livery. Really wanted to know if many other people manage to do diy/grass with working full time. I can budget for diy with some extra help here and there but just full livery in my area would be out the question and I want to do most of it myself rather than pay someone else! I factored in a vet health plan that includes vaccinations and worming into my budget plan I was just a bit worried when the lady said her horse isn’t vaccinated at all if this was a red flag I should be warey of.
I think I’m going to go back to the yard and ask some more questions and tell them I will be a new owner! Thank you for your replies everyone
 

Dyllymoo

Well-Known Member
Joined
22 November 2013
Messages
870
Thank you for that info! I have written out the monthly costs for everything else it’s just I was getting a bit confused by different types of livery. Really wanted to know if many other people manage to do diy/grass with working full time. I can budget for diy with some extra help here and there but just full livery in my area would be out the question and I want to do most of it myself rather than pay someone else! I factored in a vet health plan that includes vaccinations and worming into my budget plan I was just a bit worried when the lady said her horse isn’t vaccinated at all if this was a red flag I should be warey of.
I think I’m going to go back to the yard and ask some more questions and tell them I will be a new owner! Thank you for your replies everyone
Ok great. I am DIY and work full time and its hard work but I enjoy doing pretty much everything myself (apart from bring ins as I cant get there in time in the winter). I would say I do like having the option to ask someone to turn out (for instance we have visitors in work on Thursday and I need to be in very early, so have asked for turnout), it can make things a bit easier. But yes, best to call around some yards and see what they say :)
 

sportsmansB

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Joined
9 February 2009
Messages
842
I work full time (or more than, really) and travel a bit for work and to be honest I found complete DIY not do-able as I ended up owing everyone favours. There were no services available to pay extra for, so I had to have someone else put my horse out each day, depending who was there. Then I spent my evenings and weekends repaying the favours I had owed out during the week.

If you can get a yard where, for example, the YO will put in your morning feed and turn your horse out for a fee, then I would really recommend that rather than having to commit to going twice a day. Then if you can bring in/muck out/ prepare feeds and hay for that night and the morning and ride in the evenings its a bit more manageable. If your work is a bit unpredictable having the availability of someone you can pay to do your jobs for a night really helps.

You need to budget for:
Stable & services
Hay / haylage, bedding and feed
Travel to and from the yard
Lessons (especially on a new horse, try and have as many as you can!)
Any supplements the horse needs
Teeth
Shoes
Wardrobe (rugs, etc)
Vet treatment
Insurance
 

Maesto's Girl

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Joined
4 January 2016
Messages
286
Expect the unexpected when it comes to horsey finances! Every time I get on top of them...boom...a bill! The latest a new steamer after my faithful home made one kept breaking.

DIY with a full time job is hard and you will hate it in the winter. The evening trip becomes a struggle and I know many a friend still on DIY who do struggle through. I found a move to part livery SO much better. If I can't get back I know shes having her hay, feed, rug change, being bought in etc. I also have 3 days a week when I have a nearly 2 hour commute each way where she is on full livery and I am a MUCH happier horse owner than I was when I was on DIY. I am in the south east and pay £290 per month for this. Would be £250 without the full livery 3 x per week.

On top of this, I have hay (around 12 bales per month) - £60
Farrier (£30 every 8 weeks - barefoot with VERY good feet)
Lessons (between £15 and £35 per lesson - usually have around 5 a month - 1 pricey one and 4 £15)
Horse Insurance (between £38 - £82 depending on level of cover)
Physio (2 x per year £55 each)
Vaccinations (£65 inc call out)
Dentist (1 - 2 times per year - £50)
Saddle fitter (2 x per year. £60 each - 2 saddles)
3-4 bales of shavings per month (£40)

Other bits...
Rugs
Feeds
Supplements
Vet visits / medications
Replacement tack when your horse destroys her bridle
Yard tools (brooms/forks etc)
Clothing for you (warm and waterproof in particular)
Worming
Travel if you want to venture out to places, competitions, beaches etc

You may also have to contribute to muck heap removal/fencing/water/electric depending on yard

Basically, if you give yourself a monthly cost, then add a decent buffer you should be OK

Good luck :)
 

Mister Ted

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 August 2012
Messages
387
No judgements please
My whole life I have wanted my own horse but upto until now it has never been a consideration due to finances.
I’m now at a stage in life where I THINK I can afford one Of my own but I just don’t know where to start.
I have had various part loans. I work full time and do occasional funny shifts. I wouldn’t be able to afford full livery.
I am hoping to go grass livery or diy. I have some questions
I would be looking for a horse that is hardy enough to cope with grass livery mainly
So my questions are:
On grass livery:
How many times a day would I need to visit?
Is the horse more susceptible to illnesses?
What are the monthly expenses other than livery cost?
Can they live out in the extreme winter conditions or am I best to find somewhere with a stable?

diy:
What time would I need to be up the yard to turn out and what time would they normally come back in?

sorry if they are silly questions but I have some more...

do all horses have to be vaccinated? I’ve found a possible pony that I’ve been told is quite hardy and low maintenance but my only concern is that the lady said he is not vaccinated as she doesn’t compete? Is this right?

can someone lift the rough monthly expenses of a grass/ diy livery?

Any help would be muchly appreciated
Apart from the financial burden of owning a horse the main thing is you do need is good knowledge of how to look after one properly.Read as many books as you can and get as much information as you can to find out the answers you re looking for. Then I would get in touch with a horse charity like Blue Cross to look for a horse suitable to adopt.They will give you advice if you want a companion horse or wish to ride. The one good thing if you are unable to look after it anmore they will take it back.The cob/native types are pretty hardy and classed usually as ponies around 14.2hands. Once a day at least on visiting it,vaccination is essential as is worm control.If they live out a shelter is needed.
 

equi

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Joined
25 October 2010
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10,080
Location
Mini land
Looking at your finances is the number one priority. Think honestly about how you can live without the guts of 400 a month. Trial it too...so take that amount or more out and lock it away..and see how you are faring at the end of the month. When i had just one horse i did buy a lot of unnecessary crap that just got put in a box and never used but now i have the 5 minis too i tend to not buy anything that is not literally life saving. If you go into it thinking "do i NEED that for life?" and can answer no...youll be on to a winner lol
 

splashgirl45

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Joined
6 March 2010
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8,672
Location
suffolk
Please vaccinate for tetanus! It really is essential IMO. Flu is sensible to vaccinate for.

My horses live out and I wouldn't be happy to check only once a day. Twice a day is better, but maybe you could share checks with another livery or pay the YO to check on days that you cannot make it due to an awkward shift (so assisted livery)?

I have attached a photo of my horses a while back when we had lots of snow. They were fine out as you can see. They have a windbreak for shelter (natural shelter eg a big hedge is fine too) to get out of the worst of the weather and a hay feeder as the pic shows. The hay feeder has hardcore around it which helps get them out of the mud when it is awful. The DIY livery yard I was on previously had a similar set up and the YO added the cost of the hay onto our bill. It worked very well.
i love the hay feeder, is it for big bales? and do the bales sit on the ground or does it have a bottom as well....although i dont have a horse now my friend is trialling 24/7 turnout over winter and they seem to walk over the hay so then dont want it...she is looking for a solution..
 
Joined
19 July 2010
Messages
20,500
Yes, you can put big round bales in it. I have also used it with normal small bales (popped three in at a time) and also big 'square' bales of haylage (I can't fit a whole one of those in though, so it gets refilled as required from the same bale).

If the horses are very wasteful you can get a top that is like a haynet to stop them pulling hay out and then trampling on it. I find that when it is getting low I have to be tough and let them finish off the scraps before refilling.

It does sit on the ground and this hasn't caused an issue. If they haven't finished everything and it looks a bit manky, it is easy to open the feeder (it comes apart in two halves) and clear the ground. I have added extra mesh to stop them putting their legs through the bars because it is a sheep feeder really. :)
 

Summit

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Joined
31 July 2018
Messages
407
My horse was unvaccinated when I bought him. Not a problem at all, just got him booked in when he arrived to me.

Im DIY with stable and pay £75 per month. I visit twice a day but that’s my choice, you could go once if he has enough grazing or hay.
I put money aside weekly to cover farrier, dentist and joint supplement which are my most expensive outgoings.

my horse has all he needs but it doesn’t cost me a fortune
 

splashgirl45

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Joined
6 March 2010
Messages
8,672
Location
suffolk
My horse was unvaccinated when I bought him. Not a problem at all, just got him booked in when he arrived to me.

Im DIY with stable and pay £75 per month. I visit twice a day but that’s my choice, you could go once if he has enough grazing or hay.
I put money aside weekly to cover farrier, dentist and joint supplement which are my most expensive outgoings.

my horse has all he needs but it doesn’t cost me a fortune
that sounds really cheap.. in essex i was paying £120 for stable and grazing... grazing is in high demand as it can be difficult to find winter grazing as we are on clay.
 

Pearlsasinger

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20 February 2009
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29,322
Location
W. Yorks
Every horse needs to be checked twice per day, imo. 23 hours is a long time for an injured horse to be left untended. As a minimum, every horse should be vaccinated against tetanus. On some yards it is possible to have grass livery with a stable available in an emergency, which works well, so long as all the grass liveries don't need to use it at the same time.
Our £40 round bale of haylage last 2 horses and 6 sheep about 10 days.
 
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