Flu Misinformation ?

Joined
15 April 2018
Messages
72
Pony is up to date with vaccines, however it’s not one that protects against FC1, so I’ve arranged for vet to come out this week and give new appropriate booster.
We’re due to go to a local show this weekend; I asked the receptionist about traveling after booster and she said wait 7 days.
Same practice has told a friend on the yard that she ( in the same situation) will be fine to travel, as it’s a local show (ie. not across counties)
This makes little sense to me; who knows who will be visiting this show, where from, and what their horse is carrying? Or am I wrong?
I will speak to the vet in detail about this on the day, but would like to hear others’ thoughts on this.
I feel that the safest/ most responsible thing to do is not to travel. I’d rather lose the money that I’ve paid out for box, fees, but wondering if I am wrong.
I’m also wondering how much this will actually matter in the sense that we’re on a livery yard with new and visiting horses coming every day.
 
Last edited:

Auslander

Well-Known Member
Joined
13 November 2010
Messages
9,646
Location
Berkshire
Pony is up to date with vaccines, however it’s not one that protects against FC1, so I’ve arranged for vet to come out this week and give new appropriate booster.
We’re due to go to a local show this weekend; I asked the receptionist about traveling after booster and she said wait 7 days.
Same practice has told a friend on the yard that she ( in the same situation) will be fine to travel, as it’s a local show (ie. not across counties)
This makes little sense to me; who knows who will be visiting this show, where from, and what their horse is carrying? Or am I wrong?
I will speak to the vet in detail about this on the day, but would like to hear others’ thoughts on this.
I feel that the safest/ most responsible thing to do is not to travel. I’d rather lose the money that I’ve paid out for box, fees, but wondering if I am wrong.
I’m also wondering how much this will actually matter in the sense that we’re on a livery yard with new and visiting horses coming every day.
They will have suggested that you don't go out immediately post vaccination for two reasons. One is that the horse may be a bit off-colour for a few days post vaccination. The other is that immunity slowly increases over 7-10 days after vaccination, so your horse won't be fully protected at first.
 

Red-1

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 February 2013
Messages
7,487
Location
Yorkshire
I had mine vaccinated with the correct strain on Friday under similar circumstances (previously vaccinated but with 'wrong' strain) and thought hard about going to a RC lesson yesterday. I decided to go, as the lesson was low key and only involved 2 other horses, in an area with no known cases (whole county still clear).

I would not have gone to a show under those circumstances, where we would have come into contact with a larger number of horses.

The vet can't comment more than they have really. The only 'safe' way is to isolate your horse, which is not practical on a large livery yard. The other consideration in your case is that, as well as being more likely to get the virus, horses without the correct vaccination will shed more if they do get it.

The decision would also depend on your area and which cases are nearby. I would leave it the 7 days in your situation.
 
Joined
15 April 2018
Messages
72
They will have suggested that you don't go out immediately post vaccination for two reasons. One is that the horse may be a bit off-colour for a few days post vaccination. The other is that immunity slowly increases over 7-10 days after vaccination, so your horse won't be fully protected at first.
Thank you, that's helpful.
 

popsdosh

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 November 2008
Messages
6,382
Annoying that the same vet practice is giving out differing advice.
Thats because the vets dont know either. For what its worth at the moment and im sure ester will say the same re vaccination may help but it has shown all present vaccines have failed to some degree.
I would firstly check what was used last time and then decide if revaccination is going to be effective. Some vets are even advocating re doing them at 6 weeks ,I question their logic .
Until we get a vaccine that can control this strain we wont have 100% certainty ,this resistant strain has been about a while as there have been reports of proteq not being effective on FC1 from the continent and Ireland
 

SO1

Well-Known Member
Joined
29 January 2008
Messages
3,540
The receptionist is not qualified to give veterinary advice.

I would speak to your vet as they will be qualified. The situation is constantly changing so information may change as more is known this may lead to different advice being given depending on who you ask and when.

I would also check with the vet how quickly the horse will be protected after vaccination with the new vaccination - is it like starting again as the horse has not been vaccinated against FC1 in the last year so different to giving a booster? Will they need a 2nd injection 4 – 6 weeks later the same as if they were unvaccinated? I would have thought the logic would work like that if they were not vaccinated against FC1 strain it would be the same as being unvaccinated if the FC1 is prevalent and the process to get protected would be the same?
 
Joined
15 April 2018
Messages
72
The receptionist is not qualified to give veterinary advice.

I would speak to your vet as they will be qualified. The situation is constantly changing so information may change as more is known this may lead to different advice being given depending on who you ask and when.

I would also check with the vet how quickly the horse will be protected after vaccination with the new vaccination - is it like starting again as the horse has not been vaccinated against FC1 in the last year so different to giving a booster? Will they need a 2nd injection 4 – 6 weeks later the same as if they were unvaccinated? I would have thought the logic would work like that if they were not vaccinated against FC1 strain it would be the same as being unvaccinated if the FC1 is prevalent and the process to get protected would be the same?
My goodness, I had not thought of this!
 

Red-1

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 February 2013
Messages
7,487
Location
Yorkshire
My vet has advised that yes, if in 4 weeks the virus is still spreading, i should have the second vaccination. M horse was in date, but with the 'wrong' vaccination. She would not be as protected before the 2nd vaccination with the correct strain.

He did also say that he was not sure that a second one was necessary or helpful, but this was his best advice.

I believe he also said that we have had a 3rd, new, effective one, and that thus far this one has no horses with flu. But, that as it was so new, that could just be that not as many horses have had it so far so proportionally having zero with flu so far is not saying that it is any better than the other two, yet at least.

There is no definitive 'safe' course of action, it is about making it safe enough that the owner feels confident that they have done the right thing.
 

Goldenstar

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 March 2011
Messages
30,269
Just had the vet out to do mine as some of the venues I use are saying they are only allowing horse vaccinated in the last six months .
I brought the hunters forward as they are due in six weeks .
He told every infected vaccinated horse in this out break is young and under maximum stress and TB .
The rest are unvaccinated .
He is very clear Keeping them within six months is a good idea they are clear that gives better protection .
Apart from that he thinks we are fine to continue as usual unless you have unvaccinated horses in which case the advice is get them done .
Horses going into the surgery need to have had a jab within six months and they are checking and taking temperatures before they are unloaded .
They have seen no cases .
 
Joined
15 April 2018
Messages
72
He told every infected vaccinated horse in this out break is young and under maximum stress and TB .
The rest are unvaccinated .

They have seen no cases .
Well, this makes me feel an awful lot better. I had visions of this flu spreading like wildfire through the entire equine community.
Our vet is coming out tomorrow.
 

TheMule

Well-Known Member
Joined
14 October 2009
Messages
2,736
He told every infected vaccinated horse in this out break is young and under maximum stress and TB .
The rest are unvaccinated .
.
Well that's wrong, as there's a vaccinated teenage warmblood, who works quietly in the school a few times a week, with symptoms and tested positive approx 100m away from my front door.
 

ester

Not slacking-multitasking
Joined
31 December 2008
Messages
45,908
Location
Cambridge
No, not really! My vets are absolutely run ragged doing vaccinations as well as all the other stuff. Mine was done today. Total cost, less than £40. My vet isnt going to be getting rich on that anytime soon
I'm witholding judgement, realistically we are already pretty stretched though ;) :p
 

JFTD-WS

Wears headscarf humorously...
Joined
4 November 2010
Messages
18,195
No, not really! My vets are absolutely run ragged doing vaccinations as well as all the other stuff. Mine was done today. Total cost, less than £40. My vet isnt going to be getting rich on that anytime soon
Mine too. I don't think my vet is going on any Caribbean cruises thanks to this little outbreak!
 
Top