Fractured ankle in an oldie. Where do I go from here.

Joined
1 May 2017
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24
Please bear with me this may take time. AI will shortly be reaching the grand old age of 65. I have owned horses since I was 35 and ridden since I was 8. At the beginning of May whilst turning out my horse he reared up and got away from me breaking my ankle in 3 places. I would like to say it was just an accident but he was a wrong one. I had owned him for 11 years and he had injured me many times before. Very hot, difficult and unpredictable to ride with a multitude of health issues. You name it he had it. I kept him as I knew if I had tried to sell him he would have gone further and further down the food chain. He has now been pts.

So here I am crocked up and wondering what life will be like now. Realistically I won't be able to own another horse. I can only afford DIY livery and the thought of turning out in the morning 7 days a week in the Winter doesn't fill me with joy. A part share sounds good but where would I get one. Also, and I know this probably sounds really big-headed of me, but I have high standards. I found it appalling on my last yard that fellow liveries hadn't a clue with regard to the basics.

Also what should I do with all the accumulation of tack and sundries I have collected. Wheelbarrows, brooms, buckets, dustbins and that's besides tack etc.

Feeling rather despondent and not helped by lock down. Has anyone got any ideas and thanks fr Reading this.
 

Frano

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Joined
21 September 2019
Messages
69
Don’t rush into making any decisions, about selling your things. Depending on where you are, I am sure there will be someone looking for a sharer or keen to have knowledgable help.

I must say I am surprised by how many people who apparently have ridden for years ,know very little about looking after their own horse.
 

Nari

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Joined
27 September 2005
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2,603
You start by doing what anyone else should do, you rest up and heal.

Once you're better have a think about what you want to do. If you want one of your own would it be possible to find a yard that offers assisted DIY so you could have him turned out in the mornings? Or a yard that does grass livery so that if you got something suitable it could winter out? Would you rather share? Would you rather ride at a school or hacking centre?

If you choose to share then put up some ads in tack shops and on fb, and ask around horsey people you know. Keep an eye open for ads looking for sharers. You may have to compromise your ideals re standards though because one thing that often causes problems with shares is sharers trying to tell the owner what they should or shouldn't do, you can do your days to your standards (within reason of course, no suddenly landing them with a farrier's bill or needing a months bedding putting in) but the rest you'll just have to put up with.
 

Skib

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Joined
6 March 2011
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635
Location
London
I cant forecast exactly for you and no one can but a few pointers from my own limited experience.

I broke my ankle about 18 years ago in my 60s like you and I last rode in March 2020.

The medical side first. Injuries to bone and tissue both take 6 weeks to heal and then lots of physio which should not be ignored nor overdone. All this takes longer in older people.

I helped on a yard but never considered myself fit to care for a horse. Although it is sad not to own, I have managed through a combination of sharing and RS lessons. Shares do seem hard to find but word of mouth, going round livery yards and asking and Facebook are all possible places. Dont be depressed by failures. You only need one right one and it may set you up for years.

When sharing do write a letter asking to have first refusal if the horse is to be sold. Although you feel you cant own just now, if it were a horse you knew well and for which you could find another sharers, it might alter your mind. I had long long relationships with two mares belonging to two different people. I knew that neither would be sold away from under me.

I mentioned riding schools because when one rides for the first time after a broken ankle, it is safest to do it on the lunge and in a school. At the time one may feel it is a lost cause but I broke my ankle in the first year of learning to ride and six weeks later I was riding again. The only legacy is care needed when dismounting from a tall horse onto a stone surface in the yard.
 
Joined
1 May 2017
Messages
24
Where are you based? It’s possible someone on here near you could offer part share or has more than one horse and would like a riding companion. Advertise things you don’t need on horsey Facebook pages locally or at local tack/feed/country store.
I am based in Worcestershire.
 
Joined
3 April 2020
Messages
18
What about volunteering with a local RDA establishment? The one I volunteered for asked volunteers who could ride to exercise when classes were off for the holidays/weekends etc. I thoroughly enjoyed my time volunteering, wasn't interested in the riding though as have my own but plenty were.
 

Orangehorse

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Joined
25 November 2005
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10,802
Near Bromyard there is a riding school that takes people on long hacks, so turn up, get on, go out in the lovely countryside around Clifton, etc., get off, tie up horse and give over money. Go home. No work, nice horses that like a canter, mostly off road.
I am based in Worcestershire.
I am based in Worcestershire.

The RDA is a good idea. Echo the broken ankle advice, as I did a Trec completition with a lady who had suffered from a broken ankle and she had to have a riding partner to help her get on.

Do you know Tipton Riding School on the way to Bromyard? They go out on nice hacks around the Clifton area, mostly off road, the horses like to canter but are well behaved. They have a small indoor school.
 

Goldenstar

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Joined
28 March 2011
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35,672
I am a bit behind you but heading in the same direction .
The realisation that I don’t want to go on for ever with all the work worry hassle and cost of horses not to mention the pain of struggling through winter even with good help came on me gradually , lockdown made it clear to me you can stop you find other things to do , in my case have enough time and energy to enjoy the garden .
I am lucky I have a lovely lovely horse atm who suits me perfectly he was not easy for the first six months but now he’s a joy .
He’s also a horse who many many people would want so keeping him and loaning him will be an option or sharing fully with someone.
There’s a time that everything ends .
 

lamlyn2012

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Joined
17 November 2008
Messages
787
I wouldn’t make any hasty decisions at the moment. You’re probably feeling quite down after your accident, compounded by lockdown. I was between horses when I broke mine but did eventually start riding again, first at a RS and then bought one of my own again and am so glad I did. I’m nine years on now and still get daily pain but riding is one of the few things I can do pain free and that, and the love of my horse, is what keeps me going. And I am NOT young.
 
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