Has anyone here made a 'breaking dummy'?

Fools Motto

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And if so how did you make it?
Roughly what does it weigh and how do you secure it onto the saddle?

Pictures of them would be a great bonus!!


(ps, did you give it a name??!! lol)
 

Jazzy B

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a friend of mine did it was just legs though basically filled a pair of jogging bottoms with sand tying the legs up and the top so the sand didn't get out with rope and then he attached it the saddle flaps (sorry can't remember how he did that bit) it was brilliant and sorted out a very tricky pony who is now been happily ridden.
 
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We made one by sewing up a pillowcase, I can't remember what we filled it with, I think it was at least partly sand. We tied it up around the middle too. It was then lashed around the saddle with a sursingle. It weighed around 4 stone, it was only to break our donks in with so only needed to be little. Just needed something to sit on them to start with, as we didn't have any small enough experienced jockeys.
 

Fools Motto

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I suggest you do a lot of grooming standing on a bale, and slip a leg over regularly, few horses are terrified of a lion on their back, I back bareback tbh
This isn't for me, but a 2 year TB 'very flighty' filly. I'm personally too heavy for her. Although there isn't a quick time scale on this, she needs 'someone to sit on her'.
 
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We made one for my youngster by sowing up some clothes and filling it, but to be honest he found it that strange, and a little bit scary he just took of round the arena bronking until it fell apart!!! Was much easier just to sit on myself and he was quite accepting! But if you think it would benefit you make sure its sturdy and secure, and not too frightening!
 

tonitot

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I attempted to with Henry who was quite happy to walk around with someone on the LR, just in.walk. If I.sent them out on the lunge on their own or tried.to trot with him he just bolted and.wouldn't stop. Tried to put a dummy on him, managed to attach one side but went to do the other side and he bolted. I accidentally let go and he kicked the crap out of the dummy, I quickly gave up on that :eek:
 

Toffee44

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Personally I would just focus on tacking up, bitting and maybe a years turnout out on a 2yo but im not expert.


I used a pair of trackies stuffed with sand and straw tied at each end for a pony who was a bit tricky didnt like seeing your offside leg going over her back, once on she was fine. Worked a treat and saved my sister from a fair few bumps. It was heavy enough she felt the shift it weight over her saddle and loin.
 

Shantara

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Not sure how we made Matilda, but we don't use her anymore after she slipped and caused one of the horses to jump out the round pen and scraped his tummy. He's now also scared of people who are hanging off the side...so if you start to fall off, you'll finish!!

That experience has put us off using one (She now lives in the caravan!) so if you do, make sure it's put on properly D:
 

Miss L Toe

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This isn't for me, but a 2 year TB 'very flighty' filly. I'm personally too heavy for her. Although there isn't a quick time scale on this, she needs 'someone to sit on her'.
If destined for racing get a pro yard to back her, otherwise leave alone for a year or so, why do you think she needs someone to sit on her?
Very flighty fillies can flip upside down very quickly, l;et someone else take the risk and do the job properly.
 
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Exactly what is this, needs someone to sit on her malarky? Because if you are doing this for an owner to then send off to a race trainer you need to let someone else do it properly.

I started racehorses for a living. Flighty all depends on who is doing the describing and if your worried about sitting on her then she isn't ready to be sat on by a lump of sand never mind a rider.

Here are some rules to live by. If when you are backing babies and any of the following happens you have screwed up, bucking, bolting in fear, and not having an understanding of what you are asking. That's bad groundwork, not flighty horse. It's also why there are so many threads on why my horse is screwed up after sending away for breaking. People thinking that it's just not that difficult.

If you need a dummy then maybe you shouldn't start one or that horse does indeed have an undiagnosed issue. I've broken hundreds of horses with my husband and there were 2 that had issues physically that needed addressing.

Re read the posts in which it has gone wrong leaving horses with issues for life. All any youngster being started is looking for is a bit of confidence. They don't get that from a dummy.

Again starting horses is a skill. Yet most owners want this to be the cheapest part of owning a horse so they can spend all their money showing and riding with big names. It's such a thankless job as well as people don't get it. Do right by the horse and get someone who isn't afraid to ride the horse.

Terri
 

Spotsrock

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Personal opinion but terrible idea. Do thorough groundwork and get on. Dummy won't sit or move like a rider and would terrify my older experienced horses.
 

kerilli

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PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE DON'T DO IT.

I was lent one years ago for a very flighty homebred horse who I'd sat on a lot of times but he never relaxed and always felt very dangerous.
I tried lungeing him in it, he bolted. got away from me (i tried to hang on) and went through 3 sets of post and rails before going flat out up the drive.
Amazingly, as he hit the fence as he ran along, the girth strap snapped and it fell off. If it hadn't, I'm positive he'd have killed himself.
Because, unlike a rider it COULD NOT fall off, he was stuck with it.
I had my vet out to check him over, and explained what had happened, said it was my fault, I should have got him used to it in the stable first... he replied that another client had done that recently, the horse had gone ballistic and broken its neck against the wall.
DON'T DO IT. Please.
 

amandap

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PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE DON'T DO IT.
I agree. I also think that two is too young. She is a baby and immature both physically and mentally. Horses in racing might get backed at two but it doesn't mean all tb's or horses in general should or need to be backed at such a young age. If she is 'flighty' she needs time and sensitive work to get slowly used to stuff so she is calm and everything is 'just another day at the office'. Imo backing a 'flighty' young horse is bound to lead to problems if you feel under pressure to get it done and it is rushed especially when the horse isn't settled generally!
 

misterjinglejay

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A friend of mine had a very flighty, almost dangerous connie gelding; she went to a NH demo, and they put a dummy on him - he was scared witless, and was even worse afterwards. In theory it makes sense, but in practice, I'm not so sure.
Also, what's the rush?
 

Fools Motto

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Don't panic, that was yesterdays conversation at work, today plans have changed. The filly will stay as she is for another month or so, then go off to a pro (ready for racing). We are all too old (and me too fat!!) to back the babies now.
So, ho hum, thanks for everyone's input into this topic. I, personally have never needed a dummy rider, but I have known about others who have. I, also have never heard of so many stories of it going wrong, so thats a huge eye opener. Thanks again.
 

monkeybum13

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PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE DON'T DO IT.

I was lent one years ago for a very flighty homebred horse who I'd sat on a lot of times but he never relaxed and always felt very dangerous.
I tried lungeing him in it, he bolted. got away from me (i tried to hang on) and went through 3 sets of post and rails before going flat out up the drive.
Amazingly, as he hit the fence as he ran along, the girth strap snapped and it fell off. If it hadn't, I'm positive he'd have killed himself.
Because, unlike a rider it COULD NOT fall off, he was stuck with it.
I had my vet out to check him over, and explained what had happened, said it was my fault, I should have got him used to it in the stable first... he replied that another client had done that recently, the horse had gone ballistic and broken its neck against the wall.
DON'T DO IT. Please.
This is exactly what I thought may happen to some horses when I read the title.

Kerilli, did you manage to back the horse after this and how did he turn out?
 
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