Help!!! Big dilemma with my horse :( :( :(

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Well at the risk of you having to hit yourself in the face again, I too will say that this seems to be too quick an increase in his work load for a five year old. I would also question the ability of the YO if she didn't notice an open girth gall!
This young horse is likely to end up soured if this regime continues IMO
It wasn't meant as a long term regime tbh, more one just to wear him out before he gets into a normal less intensive routine again as he is one of those youngsters with unlimited energy. We try and turn him out everyday for as long as possible.
I won't criticise the yard owner as she's only been riding him for a few days and it was in a very hard to see position. It was only because I was looking at an old gall he had over the summer just to see what colour the hair had grown back that I noticed it. She does a great job with him and really gives him the attention and fuss he needs.
 

Pearlsasinger

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It wasn't meant as a long term regime tbh, more one just to wear him out before he gets into a normal less intensive routine again as he is one of those youngsters with unlimited energy. We try and turn him out everyday for as long as possible.
I won't criticise the yard owner as she's only been riding him for a few days and it was in a very hard to see position. It was only because I was looking at an old gall he had over the summer just to see what colour the hair had grown back that I noticed it. She does a great job with him and really gives him the attention and fuss he needs.
Does she not groom the horse prior to riding and brush him off afterwards? I'm afraid that she is NOT doing a good job with the horse, she hasn't increased his level of work gradually, nor checked the horse and his tack appropriately. I certainly wouldn't be paying her to ride my horse.
 
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Does she not groom the horse prior to riding and brush him off afterwards? I'm afraid that she is NOT doing a good job with the horse, she hasn't increased his level of work gradually, nor checked the horse and his tack appropriately. I certainly wouldn't be paying her to ride my horse.
She does brush him yes, I'm not an idiot, I wouldn't be paying for someone who I didn't trust.

The assumptions people have made here over a horse they know nothing of and the care of a horse they've never met are ridiculous and frustrating. Thank you to all those who just gave their opinion on what they thought the matter rather than passing judgement on something they know little about.

I don't think people can say with absolute certainty how well someone looks after their horse over the internet like this.

If anyone with relevant powers can just delete this thread, I'd rather they did. I can't be bothered to defend myself against people who don't know me any longer.
 

Sugar_and_Spice

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People on here have spoken common sense but you don't like it so you're having a strop. All people have done is give their opinions, including some opinions that your YO is not so great and has contributed to the problem. Though with regards to the workload she was probably only following your instructions that you wanted your horse on "bootcamp".

Nobody will delete the thread that's not how it works. I don't have anything to say about your horse that hasn't already been said. I've only posted because I'm an insomniac with nothing better to do and you've annoyed me with your moaning about the helpful and polite advice which people have given.
 

siennamum

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If he has grown up & muscled then his saddle probably doesn't fit brilliantly which would produce exactly the symptoms you are describing, but to be honest I don't think you need to analyse why he is unhappy when the obvious answer is that he has a girth gall.
 

HazyXmas

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Is this your first horse OP?

Sounds to me like he needs a bit of a break to let the girth gall heal, he needs LOTS of turnout, could he go out overnight while the weather's still ok? Then he needs his back checked & a saddle fitter out urgently. If in any doubt about his health, please speak to your vet. Hope that helps :)
 

Sussexbythesea

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Well at the risk of you having to hit yourself in the face again, I too will say that this seems to be too quick an increase in his work load for a five year old. I would also question the ability of the YO if she didn't notice an open girth gall!
This young horse is likely to end up soured if this regime continues IMO
I agree with this - and I hate the sound of boot camp. Imagine how you would feel after a few days of very intensive training?

Also why does he need boot-camp in the first place? Is this related to your concussion? Was he telling you something earlier?

A sore on his girth area would be very painful - I think you sound inexperienced to have even asked this question and wonder how you know YO is doing the right thing if you are so inexperienced.
 

Luci07

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Honestly? I would say he has done too much too quickly and is feeling sore and stiff. I know you want to bottom out his baby energy but some horses will keep going even though they are not physically fit enough. I would give him a couple of days off slower stretching work once the gall has gone and then start to build him up. Think of how you feel after a good workout at the gym or doing a class, you are often stiff the following day and you can't maintain that level of physical effort without a break.

I would also ask other posters to perhaps be a little kinder or think before posting. When people get slammed so hard, it puts them off asking questions.
 
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He's not my first horse-I've had horses for years. I know they're painful things, he had one when I first tried him. But I asked the question more as a case of would it be able to change a horse's complete way of going. I personally thought it would but I didn't want to be clutching at straws. When there's something wrong with our babies then we always want an easily treatable solution, right? A gall is much easier to treat than others things.
Me having concussion is nothing to do with him. So that's a conclusion no one has to jump to.

YO has been lunging him and then schooling him. She had planned on cutting it down next week so he doesn't get sick of the school by hacking him and only schooling twice a week. I felt this was acceptable.

Thank you to everyone who has responded and I'm sorry if I snapped at anyone but I just was scared about what was wrong.
 
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Just get him checked over by chiropractor/osteo, there can be things wrong with him that only a trained person will pick up on when lunged or in hand yet show a big difference when ridden. After that I would get a saddle fitter to check that as well. Then look at other stuff if he still isn't right. That's how I would tackle it at any rate.
 

Zero00000

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OP don't be disheartened, people are giving you very good feed back, the cause could be many things, you may not know certain things, so every angle is covered,

Nothing more I can add, I over-worked my mare when I got her, not intentionally, lets just say I was told she was doing more than she was!!

Its all a learning curve, really hope hes back to his usual supple self soon.
 

chestnut cob

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The easiest thing to do is to wait until the girth gall heals up completely and he is OK with that area being touched, then start riding again. If he feels fine, that's your answer.

He could well be quite sore from the sudden increase in amount and intensity of work too, so a few days off will help with that. If he still doesn't feel right after the gall has healed then I'd get a good equine physio out first, get him checked over for muscular tightness/ soreness, and go from there.
 

FestiveFuzz

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He's not my first horse-I've had horses for years. I know they're painful things, he had one when I first tried him. But I asked the question more as a case of would it be able to change a horse's complete way of going. I personally thought it would but I didn't want to be clutching at straws. When there's something wrong with our babies then we always want an easily treatable solution, right? A gall is much easier to treat than others things.
Me having concussion is nothing to do with him. So that's a conclusion no one has to jump to.

YO has been lunging him and then schooling him. She had planned on cutting it down next week so he doesn't get sick of the school by hacking him and only schooling twice a week. I felt this was acceptable.

Thank you to everyone who has responded and I'm sorry if I snapped at anyone but I just was scared about what was wrong.
You say want an easily treatable solution yet seem reluctant to get qualified people involved who can give you answers (this is purely an observation based on what has been said, I'm not trying to attack you in any way!). In your shoes I would be getting a physio out to check his back and then once the girth gall has healed I'd be getting a saddler out as at 5 they can change shape (particularly width!) fairly quickly. That way at the very least you'll have peace of mind that the tack you're using fits him :)
 
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Ceriann

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I would also wait for the gall to clear up - it is bound to irritate him. I would also get the saddle checked - if he's changed shape then it may no longer fit or fit as well, which may also change his way of going. Whills this may not be as obvious with his previous regime, hard intensive work in a saddle that doesnt fit or isnt as good a fit will increase the discomfort. You say he went well on the lunge, if so, that suggest that the issue may well be the girth gall/saddle. Perhaps a break with turnout and then bring him back to lunge until the gall is better - my mare is now lunged twice a week (she's five) and it has made a big difference to her fitness (i work full time so cant ride her enough to keep her ticking over) - her schooling is better too.
 

9tails

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The easiest thing to do is to wait until the girth gall heals up completely and he is OK with that area being touched, then start riding again. If he feels fine, that's your answer.

He could well be quite sore from the sudden increase in amount and intensity of work too, so a few days off will help with that. If he still doesn't feel right after the gall has healed then I'd get a good equine physio out first, get him checked over for muscular tightness/ soreness, and go from there.
What she said. If it's the girth gall, rest. If he's physically sore, rest. So: rest.
 
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