hi, an update on "Misery"

marotelle

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7 August 2010
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I am not sure if you recall my post on my mare who foaled but had no milk?
Well the little one is now nearly two months old;with expert help from the stud and vet, the mare's milk finally came through around ten days later.The foal was tiny,skinny and had to be bottle fed for the first two weeks;this resulted in a over familiar and somewhat obnoxious little fellow!
As he was now feeding from his mother we left him to his own devices,I brought him home and threw both out in a lush field.We have been having a very muggy, hot or alternative wet summer, this has brought swarms of horse flies which are driving both the foal and its mother mad.So I caved in, and now bring both in during the day.
Although"Misery" has improved in looks enormously and has grown heaps,he has now contracted ring worm!Owing to his previous behaviour we have been keeping him at a distance,I am able to touch him just about all over, but washing him down with'Imaverol' has been difficult and the poor fellow is getting very weary of me.
He has quite a few patches and I have put the product on three times, what are his chances of growing white hair on the round circles???
None of the other horses have contracted the dreaded circles, but I have had another foal born last week and they will have to share the same field, help what should I do?I
really dont want every one down with ringworm!
I would love to post pics but I am still trying to find my way around it; I wish H&H would make it a little easier!
Thanks for reading this far!
 

PorkChop

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That is great news, what a relief for you :)

I was under the impression that once ringworm had formed the "rings", and treatment has started, it was no longer contagious. So keep treating, but I would be happy to turn out with new foal, however I wouldn't use the stable for any other animals and completely disinfect. Also his hair should grow back just fine, though it may take a couple of changes of coat before the patches can't be seen.
 

asmp

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Sorry, can't help with the ringworm but just wanted to see why your horse was called Misery. My horse is called Miseria and to those of you who know Spanish will know that this translates as misery. Yes, he can be a grumpy sod at times,but how I wished I'd changed his name as soon as I'd bought him!
 

Alec Swan

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Sorry, can't help with the ringworm but just wanted to see why your horse was called Misery. My horse is called Miseria and to those of you who know Spanish will know that this translates as misery. Yes, he can be a grumpy sod at times,but how I wished I'd changed his name as soon as I'd bought him!
I've never done it, but I know of three who've changed the name of their horses, post-purchase, and each one ended in disaster.

Perhaps it was destined to happen anyway, AND I don't do 'unlucky', but it's something that I've never done and would never do! :)

Alec.
 

marotelle

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7 August 2010
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Sorry, can't help with the ringworm but just wanted to see why your horse was called Misery. My horse is called Miseria and to those of you who know Spanish will know that this translates as misery. Yes, he can be a grumpy sod at times,but how I wished I'd changed his name as soon as I'd bought him!
I know this might seem confusing, but if you have the courage and the time you could look up the post'mare has foaled but has no milk' its about 4 pages away.
The little fellow was tiny when he was born,we didn't really expect he would make it; he did pull through and has surprisingly caught up quite well.I have taken quite a few photos ; I am awaiting that he gets to three months to finally be able to judge him properly, he is a Hannoverian/SBS so will officialy have to carry another name; but to us
he will probably remain "Misery" as he really was a sorry sight!
 

FfionWinnie

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He's probably got it because he's been a bit of a waif.

I got a heifer come back with it when she had been a wandering with a neighbours cattle all summer, she had had it for ages and it wouldn't go. Unfortunately she was the show jumping variety (hence she had been out in the first place) and she got in with my cows, calves and horses. This was around July. Nothing showed any symptoms until the nights got longer (sunlight keeps it at bay) 2 of 6 horses had 1 tiny spot each and I used a garden sprayer on them to cover them in imaverol but the cattle who were naive, were covered in it. I've never had it here before or since but it raged on all winter and only went in the Spring.

Vet reckons anything with a compromised immune system gets a heavier dose of it.

His coat will be ok, but I would not be surprised if he doesn't spread it to the other foal minimum.
 

HashRouge

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16 February 2009
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Manchester
Sorry, can't help with the ringworm but just wanted to see why your horse was called Misery. My horse is called Miseria and to those of you who know Spanish will know that this translates as misery. Yes, he can be a grumpy sod at times,but how I wished I'd changed his name as soon as I'd bought him!
If it's any consolation it could have been worse - I have come across two Lusos who, if you translate their names from Portuguese, have the misfortune to be called Shawl and Obelisk (Xaile and Obelisco) :p

OP glad foal is on the mend, sounds like you've been through the ringer with this one!
 
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