Horse strong in company

ails

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23 December 2018
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Having just bought my horse in looking for advise? He is 15.3hh chestnut gelding breed unknown he is a pure gentleman ridden absolute bombproof when ridden alone but when I went for a hack with my daughter's pony on the road he was like a different horse kept trotting and I could feel he had zoned out from me I eventually faced him into a gate to stop him any advise or anyone had this problem ? As I really want to be confident riding with my daughter.
 

Shay

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17 August 2008
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Many horses change when ridden in company. The dynamics are very different. I'm afraid I have more questions for you just now than answers. Had you ridden him in company before you bought him? Does he know the pony? Are they turned out together? Who was in the lead when you felt you could not stop him? Have you ridden close together in an arena before heading out - what happened then?
 

ails

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23 December 2018
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Thanks for reply I ha e to say the last owner say she felt him strong in company before I bought him but she has only being riding a year and doesn't canter or jump yet so I thought that may have been nerves on her behalf ..in an arena setting his perfect ..i was leading and when my daughter suggested she d catch up and we d rife side by side I felt him race and yes his in the same paddock as the pony after it happened I went back up the road alone and he was perfect so it's strange just wondering how can It be solved ? His 15 years old
 

paddi22

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5 December 2010
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What i found really useful with horses like that is to use fields as a schooling session. so go in with another horse and start in walk, let one horse walk faster and go in front, and then slow that horse and let the other pass it. practice controling the pace in walk and also halting until you know you have the gears and the breaks you need. if the horse picks the pace at any stage you need to use the correct level of force to get it listening and respecting you to go at the speed you want. when you are happy in walk, then do it in trot. take it in turns to slow the trot and let the other go in front, and then switch. make sure you can do trot to halt.

If you aren't 100% confident you know what to do to control the pace, go on a hacking lesson with an instructor, and let them teach you actions you can take when the horse acts up. So you have a toolbox of techniques you can use when needed.
 

ails

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23 December 2018
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Many horses change when ridden in company. The dynamics are very different. I'm afraid I have more questions for you just now than answers. Had you ridden him in company before you bought him? Does he know the pony? Are they turned out together? Who was in the lead when you felt you could not stop him? Have you ridden close together in an arena before heading out - what happened then?
What i found really useful with horses like that is to use fields as a schooling session. so go in with another horse and start in walk, let one horse walk faster and go in front, and then slow that horse and let the other pass it. practice controling the pace in walk and also halting until you know you have the gears and the breaks you need. if the horse picks the pace at any stage you need to use the correct level of force to get it listening and respecting you to go at the speed you want. when you are happy in walk, then do it in trot. take it in turns to slow the trot and let the other go in front, and then switch. make sure you can do trot to halt.

If you aren't 100% confident you know what to do to control the pace, go on a hacking lesson with an instructor, and let them teach you actions you can take when the horse acts up. So you have a toolbox of techniques you can use when needed.
 

ails

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23 December 2018
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Thanks that's what I will do I will get an instructor to help he is 15 years old so do you think I can change him ? I know it's early days I only have him 10 days and hope to go on funrides with my daughter eventually it' will be shame not to be able to enjoy him.in company as he is so quiet and easy going other than that ..changing his tack as in bit or nose and is not the answer when he responds so well alone so you think ??
 

Pearlsasinger

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I would be tempted to try him in a bit with 2 reins, Pelham or Universal depending on what he does when he gets strong, ride him on the snaffle rein most of the time but have the curb rein available to remind him of his manners, especially if you are riding with your child when you need him to be sensible.
 

ails

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23 December 2018
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I would be tempted to try him in a bit with 2 reins, Pelham or Universal depending on what he does when he gets strong, ride him on the snaffle rein most of the time but have the curb rein available to remind him of his manners, especially if you are riding with your child when you need him to be sensible.
He just seems to zone out and not listen to command which can be scary as you say when I'm also looking our for my daughter on her pony so I do need to resolve it
 
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My lad, particularly when he's fresh, likes to compete/jog/race with others on hacks. He's a saint, albeit a spooky one, when we're on our own.

I've found it helpful to lunge him in the school while others are riding and really work on how connected he is to my voice. That way he's got the distraction of other horses, though with time becomes more and more focused on what I'm asking of him. This has translated to lots of asking him to "waaallllllllkkkkkk, waaaaalllllllkkkkk" while relaxing my reins and seat on hacks. It's early days but it's definitely making a difference. Oh, and he's 20 - so if we can work on this, then at 15 your boy will nail it.
 

ails

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23 December 2018
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My lad, particularly when he's fresh, likes to compete/jog/race with others on hacks. He's a saint, albeit a spooky one, when we're on our own.

I've found it helpful to lunge him in the school while others are riding and really work on how connected he is to my voice. That way he's got the distraction of other horses, though with time becomes more and more focused on what I'm asking of him. This has translated to lots of asking him to "waaallllllllkkkkkk, waaaaalllllllkkkkk" while relaxing my reins and seat on hacks. It's early days but it's definitely making a difference. Oh, and he's 20 - so if we can work on this, then at 15 your boy will nail it.
Thanks I think If i can gain confidence that he is nt going to take off!!!.its frustrating to have him so good and then completely change around others in my usual experience horses and ponies tend to relax more in a group whereas my boy thinks his in a race !!
 

NinjaPony

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25 March 2011
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My Connemara is practically perfect in every way... but can be a bit obnoxious in company! He was used as the sensible lead for the young stallions with his old owners, or hacked alone. As a consequence, he is an excellent solo hack, and very good generally- but he has to be in front. If not, he gets competitive, and can be a bit strong if the mood takes him.
Sometimes sensible steady horses are put in the lead, and can then get a bit stroppy when made to go behind, or when they feel another horse is ‘overtaking’.
Mine is 18 and to be honest I’ve just accepted that he needs to go in front, and he’s better in small groups not big ones. He’s much easier in the lead so that’s what we do.
Having said that, changing his bit has really helped. His schooling bit is a simple French link snaffle, but for hacking I use a 2 ring universal on the snaffle ring, it just gives me that bit more control and he respects it, so I only have to ask once to get him to listen. Definitely think some ‘hacking leasons’ are a good idea- I could probably use some my self!
 

ails

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Joined
23 December 2018
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7
My Connemara is practically perfect in every way... but can be a bit obnoxious in company! He was used as the sensible lead for the young stallions with his old owners, or hacked alone. As a consequence, he is an excellent solo hack, and very good generally- but he has to be in front. If not, he gets competitive, and can be a bit strong if the mood takes him.
Sometimes sensible steady horses are put in the lead, and can then get a bit stroppy when made to go behind, or when they feel another horse is ‘overtaking’.
Mine is 18 and to be honest I’ve just accepted that he needs to go in front, and he’s better in small groups not big ones. He’s much easier in the lead so that’s what we do.
Having said that, changing his bit has really helped. His schooling bit is a simple French link snaffle, but for hacking I use a 2 ring universal on the snaffle ring, it just gives me that bit more control and he respects it, so I only have to ask once to get him to listen. Definitely think some ‘hacking leasons’ are a good idea- I could probably use some my self!
thanks very much sounds very like him I feel so confident with him when his alone his engaged and listening to me but I even feel the change in him from beneath me once I know I can gain control and keep him listening I will be delighted .
I'm starting lessons with him for 6 weeks this Saturday so I'll let you know how it goes thanks again
 
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