How are we doing?

Horsekaren

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Again, i don't expect anyone to have the time to bore through one of my boring clips but if anyone is bored i'd be grateful :)

The boy had a little more energy today and i felt i managed to get some nice inconsistent work from him.
I think i can spot when he is working over his back as his head disappears in front of me (sorry i know thats bad but i am learning feel) When his head drops is he working over his back and is he forward? To me it feels very slow but if i push him on head comes up and he falls onto forehand (again i can only tell this because his head comes up)
My reins are long and inconsistent but i find for now this is the easiest way for me to reward when he answers, plus it stops me hanging on the outside rein which i think is why it has taken so long to get to this point.
We managed a fairly nice 10m on the right rein but the left was terrible (this is my weak side, and his) Any tips or keen eyes can see where i am going so terribly wrong? Leg

If this was a intro test would a comment of needs to be more forward appear? and is that even possible right now? if i keep sticking at this will he keep getting stronger and more consistent or do i need to push him.

just keen to see if still on right track or wavering. All advice welcome as always :)

 

ihatework

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I think for the stage you are both at there is a noticeable improvement.

I wouldn’t be aiming for more forward or impulsion just yet.

Your next step for me would be to aim for a fractionally shorter rein with a more even contact, and introducing more transitions. Also keep an eye on staying straight on a straight line and bend through the body on a curve
 

stormox

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What a fab school! IMO - and remember this is ONLY an OPINION I think he is a fair way off tracking up, and is hollow at times. Are you sure you arent concentrating too much on the front end? I think he should be pushing more from behind and when he is you can think about containing it. Remember the first 3 on the scales of training are suppleness impulsion rhythm - then contact/connection.
Nice cob, neat rider though.
 

Pearlsasinger

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You are very brave, putting yourself up for criticism!
There are some very good moments, especially when you are on a circle, can you remember what those moments felt like, what you were doing then, as opposed to when you were in a straight line? I did think, right at the beginning that you looked to be twisting your upper body a bit as you rose in trot, which is something to be aware of.

Do you have an instructor who can see what is happening and give you instant feedback? I think that is the way to go really.:)
 

Horsekaren

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Thanks!

Yes i have an instructor, lessons every week but when i'm on my own i feel like that's when i can really focus on feel and having a play around.

Is my lower leg to mobile? i feel i bound and move alot in my legs when i rise. Ive tried focusing on heels down and it makes my legs feel strong but im not sure if that is actually tension? (i then think about something else and my legs move again lol )

Agreed i find being straight a lot harder than being on a circle, im not sure if i tense up and i haven't mastered flexion on a straight line without interfering. Because this is only about 3 weeks into having a lot more consistent frame i'm scared of getting too excited and pushing him for to much when he is trying so hard.

I think i am focusing a lot on the front but not aggressively, im trying to be still and soft and ask quietly when he has fallen out. Perhaps when i am asking for more from behind i am possibly blocking him trying to contain it.

Transitions i will defo try more of :)

the bouncing into canter has lessened so i think balance must be improving.

Pearsasinger- the twist i didnt notice but i am sure that was me trying to flex, thanks for spotting that.

and Yes, my elbows actually can bend :D i'm in a phase between bent elbows but flappy reins unless he is correct, or short reins and straight arms. We will find the happy medium at some point.
 

JFTD-WS

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I think there's noticable improvement too. I'd echo PaS's comments about straightness, bend and how your rising is affecting that - can you sit his trot? It won't cure the wonky rise, but it would enable you to sit on the smaller circles and that can help - it can also help when you are working on transitions within paces to move between sitting and rising.

I'd also suggest you spend some time in every session working solely on you - ignore the pony's head, and spend a few minutes trotting around with loose reins (as in this video - that's fine) and practice lifting your hands like Carl Hester and really carrying them in front of you, pushing them towards the horse's neck, and bringing them back (though not grabbing his mouth) - if you can't keep a contact that way yet, that's fine, what you're looking for is developing independence in your hands. It's easier to move them around than keep them still, but by moving them, you're gaining better control over them (like children doing mounted games etc). I'd also suggest working on the same for your legs, so you can develop the stillness you want - in walk or halt, lift them away from his sides, stretch them out, reach down / round - there are lots of exercises for this, you probably did some when you first started riding at a school. He looks sensible enough that you can work on this sort of thing for your benefit as well as working on him.
 

CMcC

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Lots of positives as others have said. But one question: you seem to be kicking him on every time you sit, apologises if not as it is hard to see if you are making contact. Once in a gait it is your horse’s responsibility to maintain gait, should not need reminding constantly. You should only use legs to push in if he breaks gait, or is about to break gait.
 

blitznbobs

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Just add impulsion and the picture will be great. Think of it this way - when trotting round what would happen if you asked for canter? Would it be immediate cos he’s so popping with energy or would it take a few strides... you want to be aiming for the former ALL THE TIME ...if you don’t have that level of energy your trot isn’t really going forward
 

ihatework

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Just add impulsion and the picture will be great. Think of it this way - when trotting round what would happen if you asked for canter? Would it be immediate cos he’s so popping with energy or would it take a few strides... you want to be aiming for the former ALL THE TIME ...if you don’t have that level of energy your trot isn’t really going forward
At the moment it would go out the front door and the horse would fall on his face. Neither are quite ready for that yet, although in time that is what is needed.
 

Horsekaren

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That's great advise, i will deffo try that, i struggle to focus on me and him, when i just think about me i'm still, as soon as i concentrate on what else i'm trying to achieve i forget about me **off to Google Carl Hesters hands** :p

I agree it looks like i am pestering every stride but i'm not making contact. I'm not sure what is going on :/ why would that happen? Where they move and are unstable when i want to engage my legs they feel soft. I wonder if i'm relying on them to post hmmmmm
 

ihatework

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That's great advise, i will deffo try that, i struggle to focus on me and him, when i just think about me i'm still, as soon as i concentrate on what else i'm trying to achieve i forget about me **off to Google Carl Hesters hands** :p

I agree it looks like i am pestering every stride but i'm not making contact. I'm not sure what is going on :/ why would that happen? Where they move and are unstable when i want to engage my legs they feel soft. I wonder if i'm relying on them to post hmmmmm
Do you know what would really help?
Lunge lessons.
 

J&S

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I have never commented on a post like this before, but, as I do spend quite a lot of time helping my riders at RDA I feel I can possibly indentify some thing to usefully add/change. When rising to the trot try to think "forward and back" rather than "up and down" and keep your rises as low as possible. I would also like to see stiller (more stable?) legs. Nice rhythm to the trot for this work.
 

mule

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That's great advise, i will deffo try that, i struggle to focus on me and him, when i just think about me i'm still, as soon as i concentrate on what else i'm trying to achieve i forget about me **off to Google Carl Hesters hands** :p

I agree it looks like i am pestering every stride but i'm not making contact. I'm not sure what is going on :/ why would that happen? Where they move and are unstable when i want to engage my legs they feel soft. I wonder if i'm relying on them to post hmmmmm
Legs often move without us being aware of it. I'm not sure why, but it's common. I think both you and your pony look great.
ps, (I'm also off to Google Carl Hester's hands);)
 
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tristar

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brill, the rhythm is good, very good, try introducing some transitions to walk and back into trot with a view to trot to halt back to trot, in the future, but all gradual as so he can find it easy as he learns, when in the future you can trot halt trot you may find the gathering up of the halt will help him to move off more engaged and from this he will naturally become more forward as his body gets fitter and can cope with carrying himself

your arms are still too straight at times, and towards the end of the video you have a loop in your reins, but all far better than clutching at the horses mouth, you probably need to learn to relax your legs.

i like the way you let him go forwards in his balance and just keep going, if you want to do sitting trot go from walk into trot and sit for a few strides then go rising, just to practice sitting trot, but i would keep off his back as much as poss and ride with a light seat even in canter, no hard driving seat, but at the same time learning to use your seat bones to encourage him to go from light leg aids
 

eggs

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Definitely a big improvement from the last video I saw. There is more activity in the trot than in the Intro test.

A lot of good comments have been made about shorter reins and being straighter. When you are able to ride with shorter reins so that you keep a consistent contact and there is no 'loop' in the reins you should find that you are better able to contain your horse's energy without it falling out of the front door.

I would suggest doing more transitions - either within the pace or between the paces - eg. walk 10 steps then trot 10 steps then walk again. You can ride your transitions within a movement as well. I find this helps the horse to be more 'switched on' rather than just endlessly just riding around in the same pace.

I find it very helpful in rising trot to think or my hips going up and forwards over the pommel of the saddle rather than just going straight up.
 

PapaverFollis

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I like it. I think it's a nice place for him to be working to build strength. The trot can grow from there, will grow from there as he gets stronger.

I think you are having to put too much effort into your rise which is making your lower leg wobble. It looks like you are pushing up with your feet. I think it is because you are too upright in your upper body. In the sit phase your shoulders should be inclined slightly in front of your hips as you rise the hips arc upwards until you are upright at the very top of the rise then arc softly back to the saddle for the next sit. Keep the rise and the effort level low and easy.

You are doing fantastic though..lots to like.
 

Red-1

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So much better!

I have some observations...

When it is all going nice then you look nice too, but when he drops off his energy I think you are easing the reins to encourage him forwards. He then lifts and disengages. I would be sure to keep the contact and carry a schooling whip, and just use it as a tap tap if he drops off, so you are riding him positively forwards into a stable contact rather than trying to shoo him into one.

I would also, with the type of horse he is, have a target, say at the moment one circle with energy coming forwards. If he does that then I would let him walk and have a break. I find with 'cold' blood horses they are more cheerful and see the point if they believe they will gain from the extra effort. The break only has to be 1/4 of a circle and forwards to trot again, so it is about transitions, but using the transitions to give the horse the idea that extra work is rewarded. I would then increase the target to a circle and a circuit, for instance.

With him I think that instead of me keeping the outline, my job is to set the rein length and then ride the BROWBAND forwards. So, if he goes high and hollow it is because the browband came back at me, so I have to tap it forwards again. If I let go with the reins the browband won't come forwards, as the nose will come forwards instead. I find that thinking of the browband means I can have a quiet hand, but I keep the contact.

As regards mobile legs, I agree that you must think of rising back and forwards in an arc rather than up and down. Rather non intuitively, often the more you try to keep legs still the more you restrict the movement of the leg from the hip. Sadly the horse's back moves quite a lot, and if he is moving quite a lot and your hips are only moving a little, it results in the ends of your legs moving. If you think of moving more in the hips to match the movement of the horse, it actually results in less movement of the extremities.
 

Leo Walker

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The best way to teach someone the right way to rise is to get someone to lead him or lunge him, drop the reins and rest your hands, palms flat on his shoulders in front of the saddle. Start at halt and rise forward then lower yourself down. Its hard work at a halt as theres no momentum to force you up. When you think you've got it, go into trot. Exactly the same procedure, but easier. Let his movement push you forwards, with you controlling the height and speed of the rise, and then lower yourself down.

Lots of people get taught "up, down, up, down" when they learn to trot. Its not up down at all. If you just go up down you end up behind the movement and then you are constantly playing catch up and falling back down. Its forwards, down using your core to make sure that you are in charge of the rise and sit.
 

scats

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I think the instability of your lower leg is coming from you using them to help you rise. Think of the rise coming from the hips, swing them forward and back rather than thinking of up and down. You should barely come out the saddle really. Also, think of taking the weight down your quads for the rise, rather than into your legs and feet, that way you can let your legs hang and use them only when you need to apply an aid.
 

Pearlsasinger

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Alt I wonder if you might find a mechanical horse session useful?

I can recommend this. I have had a couple of series of lessons on a mechanical horse when recovering from injuries and also some with a physio who rides - they were extremely useful, because the rider and instructor can concentrate purely on the rider's position. I think you would find it very helpful when riding your horse to forget about his way of going and concentrate on your own position. If the rider is riding correctly, the horse will go correctly, unless there is some physical reason why he can't.
 

ester

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I spent too long with instructors that focused more on the horse''s way of going than me, my legs/toes never seemed to want to sit in quite the right place etc. In reality it was actually only a few small changes that I just had to get 'in my head' by them being described the 'right way' that made a massive difference to his way of going.

I've had a few revelations over the years, bending elbows properly was one of them ;), but also sorting my legs out from the hip not just trying to move my lower legs about to fix them. I wish I'd been facilitated to have some of those earlier!
 

Pearlsasinger

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I spent too long with instructors that focused more on the horse''s way of going than me, my legs/toes never seemed to want to sit in quite the right place etc. In reality it was actually only a few small changes that I just had to get 'in my head' by them being described the 'right way' that made a massive difference to his way of going.

I've had a few revelations over the years, bending elbows properly was one of them ;), but also sorting my legs out from the hip not just trying to move my lower legs about to fix them. I wish I'd been facilitated to have some of those earlier!

Do you remember Littlelegs' post

https://forums.horseandhound.co.uk/...work-position-is-correct.573851/post-11232839

(I hope this is the right one:confused:)
 

Pearlsasinger

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Sorry this was the post Iwas trying to find:


And possibly the best advice I have ever had was from a rather blunt boss, which went along the lines of 'if you cba to sit in the right ****ing place, why the **** should the horse bother? And if by chance it does, how the **** would it know it was there if you aren't too for **** sake?'. Maybe not the politest way to explain, but none the less true.
Read more at https://forums.horseandhound.co.uk/...an-outline.561227/page-11#YSCURcHDAYxX5wC5.99


Karen, if you can bear to, it might be quite useful for you to look at this thread, which has a lot of photos and critiques of them (it's a long thread). Have a go at looking at how the riders are riding and then read the comments from knowledgeable people like Tigertail, Littlelegs and Wagtail, to see if you have picked up the same things. You will be able to see how the rider influences the horse, which will help you to see what influences your horse. There are a couple of riders whose position is excellent;)
 
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