How can you tell if an unbacked horse is going to be good?

oldie48

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In support of this, I have a couple of friends whose teenagers have been bought a young horse to move onto after ponies, but the young horse has spent a year or so being produced by a professional before the teen takes over...

Much more expensive way of doing things, but at least the right buttons are being put in place.

Fiona
Spot on. We got a lot of help from my daughter's trainer from whom we bought the horse. she may not have rocketed through the levels on him but he was safe despite being young and in my book that's worth a lot. Tbh with a better, more experienced rider he would have progressed well as he was not without talent but he was a forgiving sort. When she went to uni I was very tempted to keep him for myself!
 

Ambers Echo

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In support of this, I have a couple of friends whose teenagers have been bought a young horse to move onto after ponies, but the young horse has spent a year or so being produced by a professional before the teen takes over...

Much more expensive way of doing things, but at least the right buttons are being put in place.

Fiona
This is kind of what they are doing.
One has just spent a few weeks being backed. Now with teen for riding away but will be going back periodically to produce further. And on-going schooling at their yard with a pro rider too.
 

Fiona

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This is kind of what they are doing.
One has just spent a few weeks being backed. Now with teen for riding away but will be going back periodically to produce further. And on-going schooling at their yard with a pro rider too.
It still may not make a 4* eventer, but sounds like its definitely being produced correctly in that case, so best of luck to them....

Fiona
 

Trules

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3 April 2012
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A friend of mine has an amazing eye for a young horse. He is buying to be potential eventers.
He maintains that attitude comes above all. He looks for the pushy, cheeky ones in a crowd of youngsters as they are often bravest generally. The ones who come to the front of the gang at the gate to see who the strangers are.
If they are loose schooled, hes looking for a naturally balanced canter that isn't as long as a bus (those ones take much longer) and an intelligent attitude to a jump if there is one there- not necessarily the flashiest massive jumper. If they hit a pole hes not worried but would be happy with one who jumped it differently the next time.
He looks for good legs and feet, for soundness.
great advice thankyou for sharing.
I have a 3 year old filly in my field at the moment. she is definitely in the cheeky/ pushy camp so that's a plus point!
 
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