how is equine dentistry service quality and accessibility in your area?

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I've checked old threads about that but most of them 10+ years old

Maybe you work with a good pactitioner regularly so you can feel good or you may have some bad stories about dental practitioner even maybe you have faced some troublemaker /half-educated people, absolutely everyone has some good and bad stories in this case but I try to see bigger Picture.
for ex.
- if your existing dental practitoner retired/moved could you find another good one easily?
- do you wait for long time for a booking ? and overdue?
- What do you think about their education / hands on training level?
or maybe you can feel lucky / unlucky yourself because of your area...

thoughts?
 

minesadouble

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I personally would love to see equine dentistry regulated so that only fully qualified dentists/vets can practice dentistry.

We have had a bad experience on our yard with an equine dentist apparently qualified in a non-EU country yet I still see people recommending him again and again.
We now have an absolutely brilliant BAEDT dentist who I trust implicitly
 

TPO

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I don't really understand what you are asking. Do you want examples of good and bad experiences? If so, why?

If anyone is using someone untrained/unqualified as an EDT then the onus is on them; it's not hard to check who is and isn't qualified. Good practitioners in all fields are generally busy so to be overdue is bad planning on the owner's behalf as appointments should be made in advance.

In an attempt to answer your points:

I would only use BAEDT/BEVA registered EDT. I wouldn't use a vet, after many bad experiences, unless they were BAEDT trained and qualified.

My EDT holds a degree in Equine Dentistry from Hartpury and I have used him pretty much since he qualified and started advertising.

If he was no longer available I would use another EDT from BAEDT/BEVA list. I believe there are 3 currently covering Scotland but I haven't looked in a long time.

No problem with booking/overdue as I know when the horses are due and book in plenty of time. I wouldn't expect to be slotted in at short notice, apart from an emergency, as I appreciate how busy and in demand my EDT is.
 

wills_91

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I have used the same edt for many years (I believe he has a family member who posts on here) he is the only option in our area, but that's fine as he's good at his job, good with the animals, is there when he says he will he ect, he comes to the yard twice a year and we book the next visit when he is there. I have no idea what I would do if he moved away or retired but I don't think I need to worry about either anytime soon
 

TPO

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I have used the same edt for many years (I believe he has a family member who posts on here) he is the only option in our area, but that's fine as he's good at his job, good with the animals, is there when he says he will he ect, he comes to the yard twice a year and we book the next visit when he is there. I have no idea what I would do if he moved away or retired but I don't think I need to worry about either anytime soon
I think we must use the same person ;)
 

Follysmum

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I have used the same dentist for many years and he’s fully qualified he uses hand tools
There are lots on the list to choose from if I needed another for various reasons but I wouldn’t want to use power tools.
There are a few nearer to me that have been recommended to me but have only trained without all the exams and are cheaper.
 

meleeka

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I have used the same dentist for many years and he’s fully qualified he uses hand tools
There are lots on the list to choose from if I needed another for various reasons but I wouldn’t want to use power tools.
.
Can I ask why you are against power tools? The one my fully qualified dentist uses isn’t harsh at all. He put it on my skin to show me that it’s very gentle. It also makes the job quicker and my horses don’t mind at all because it’s over as soon as possible with no pressure.

I am fortunate that there are two very good EDT’s in my area. If my one went anywhere I’d have no hesitation in using the other. I do have one pony that needs sedating so I will get the vet to do that one, but my vets sedate everything which I don’t think is necessary with my others.

I am always amazed at people who are quite happy to use an unqualified person based on recommendation from a stranger on the internet!
 

Follysmum

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Im Probably old school and so is my dentist. He prefers to listen to the sound of the rasp when he is working and rasp accordingly.
I’m sure power tools are fine and I’m not knocking it, just personal choice.
 

Tiddlypom

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I suspect that power tools are less harsh on the teeth than a hand held rasp.

Not sure what is behind the OP’s post but yes, I have a good and qualified EDT. He has mentored a few trainees, some of whom have been been here with him and worked on my horses, so I would choose one of them if he ever hangs up his power tools. He’s here next week for my 3, inc the mare with a missing molar whose mouth he rescued after she had had previous poor/incompetent dentistry.
 

Fanatical

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Very happy with mine. Have been employing his services for 25 years. In fact, he is visiting this evening. :)
Very reliable, always lets me know if he's running late and is easy to get hold of if I have any issues/ queries.
 

ycbm

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Until power tools were introduced I had never heard of a case where too much was taken off or where the teeth or mouth were damaged by being by heated up. I've had a horse's teeth scalped by an incompetent vet using them. I'm still wary of their use, but I do now use a dentist who uses them who I trust not to do too much. And I'm happy because it's quicker, and less time with the mouth propped open with a gag.

What's the situation in the US, MR?
 

Goldenstar

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Having had two bad experiences with edt’s I will only let vets from the practise I use who have done the extra dental training near my horses mouths
They also have a visiting vet who deals with very specialist issues who have never used but would be happy to do in necessary in the past I have taken horses to a vet uni for specialist procedures in the past .
Nothing ever every induce me to risk a EDT again .
I don’t wait long for dentals usually the week I book it or the next week .
 

splashgirl45

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i used my own vet who had done the extra training so had the best of both worlds as he could sedate if necessary so everything was done on the booked day. the practice used to send a reminder when horses were due so coupled with me using a diary to keep all my horses dates in we never went over the year....
 

holeymoley

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Always used edt, used a vet once who insisted on sedation as used power tools. Absolutely not required and have always stuck to manual tools since. Current vet highly respects current edt so happy with that.
 
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Are you an equine dentist?
to say ''I'm a dentist'' I need to study for 5 years :) dentist describes human dentists.
But yes I'm an EDT.


I personally would love to see equine dentistry regulated so that only fully qualified dentists/vets can practice dentistry.

We have had a bad experience on our yard with an equine dentist apparently qualified in a non-EU country yet I still see people recommending him again and again.
We now have an absolutely brilliant BAEDT dentist who I trust implicitly
it depends on the education and hands on training...I know an EU based practitioner WHO says that ''I'm head instructor of an equine dental academy/school''
and I try to fix 2 horses for 3 years caring by himself previously. horses still not good as %100 you would not look inside. a real disaster mouth(I do not wanna say he is from which country but not from UK or IRE) I mean half-educated people everywhere.

I don't really understand what you are asking. Do you want examples of good and bad experiences? If so, why?

If anyone is using someone untrained/unqualified as an EDT then the onus is on them; it's not hard to check who is and isn't qualified. Good practitioners in all fields are generally busy so to be overdue is bad planning on the owner's behalf as appointments should be made in advance.

In an attempt to answer your points:

I would only use BAEDT/BEVA registered EDT. I wouldn't use a vet, after many bad experiences, unless they were BAEDT trained and qualified.

My EDT holds a degree in Equine Dentistry from Hartpury and I have used him pretty much since he qualified and started advertising.

If he was no longer available I would use another EDT from BAEDT/BEVA list. I believe there are 3 currently covering Scotland but I haven't looked in a long time.

No problem with booking/overdue as I know when the horses are due and book in plenty of time. I wouldn't expect to be slotted in at short notice, apart from an emergency, as I appreciate how busy and in demand my EDT is.
Firstly sorry for questions if I disturb. Maybe I should explain better.
I'm not from your country, I also post to non-UK horsemanship forums and I worked invarious countries.
But modern horsemanship formed in UK, you have 1.2M licensed rider, millions of horses, highest quality TB horses in UK I think.
I know very good British horsepeople, exercise riders, farriers, pleasure riders...
Then I see a lot of threads -dentist disaster- -my horses overdue- -my horses can not eat after dentist-
etc. and most of them surprsing for me cos I see often. Naturally I ask to myself ''how this perfect horse country can not have enough/well educated EDTs?'' I met a British lady yesterday WHO is from Sussex. she also exhausted because of overdue but she doesn't want to try another one.
So just curious, are these threads a kind of personal rants in a big forum or reality of this country? Replies shows that : sounds like first one! by the way a lot of posters have complaints about farriers. that is another suprising story for me.

I have used the same dentist for many years and he’s fully qualified he uses hand tools
There are lots on the list to choose from if I needed another for various reasons but I wouldn’t want to use power tools.
There are a few nearer to me that have been recommended to me but have only trained without all the exams and are cheaper.
You may have bad stories about power tools but personally I do not know any person on the earth WHO fix a big hook unless power tools. so if she/he wants to use, should use.
Definitely your choice, your horses. just an advice.

Until power tools were introduced I had never heard of a case where too much was taken off or where the teeth or mouth were damaged by being by heated up. I've had a horse's teeth scalped by an incompetent vet using them. I'm still wary of their use, but I do now use a dentist who uses them who I trust not to do too much. And I'm happy because it's quicker, and less time with the mouth propped open with a gag.

What's the situation in the US, MR?
I have never seen an EDT who just uses just manual rasps. That can not be a choice or stlye. An EDT must use both properly. That is telling like -I just use summer tyres even winter times in Scotland-
(if someone work with just only 2-3-4 years old young racehorses in Newmarket, manuals may work on %99 of horses, that may be logical) heating reasons : staying on the tooth for long time, trying improperly bitseat and overfloating. All of them human mistakes.
In North America I hear same stories hardly ever and most of them performed by beginner practitioners. I can not remember a horse lost his tooth or has eating problem after 5 years experienced EDT visit
 
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Follysmum

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I have never seen an EDT who just uses just manual rasps. That can not be a choice or stlye.

There are quite a few in the UK that are manual only, my edt is one and it is his choice
He’s been in the business for over 25yrs
 

Leo Walker

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I have no issues with dentists in this area. We have several very good qualified professionals. I'm happy with the service I receive. I swapped EDT when I changed areas slightly but had no issues getting someone else. I am in a very horsey area though.
 

EventingMum

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I have used the same edt for many years (I believe he has a family member who posts on here) he is the only option in our area, but that's fine as he's good at his job, good with the animals, is there when he says he will he ect, he comes to the yard twice a year and we book the next visit when he is there. I have no idea what I would do if he moved away or retired but I don't think I need to worry about either anytime soon
I don't think you do! ;)
 

JanetGeorge

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I personally would love to see equine dentistry regulated so that only fully qualified dentists/vets can practice dentistry.

We have had a bad experience on our yard with an equine dentist apparently qualified in a non-EU country yet I still see people recommending him again and again.
We now have an absolutely brilliant BAEDT dentist who I trust implicitly
lol, wouldn't like that - until my ruddy brilliant EDT gets around to jumping through the vet's hoops. I have had several vets do teeth who were appalling: wouldn't do teeth without sedation, and missed obvious problems that caused serious problems. My 'unqualified' EDT has been invited to deliver dental training to vets in 2 European countries - and invited back. He has only ONCE (doing more than 40 of my horses, including 3-4 year olds for the first time) required sedation - and that was for the horse's safety as he removed two totally misplaced wolf teeth on the lower jaw (risk of a nasty haemorrhage if horse 'objected'). The equine vet from my practice who came at short notice for the sedation stayed and watched with awe - he'd never seen teeth in that place (inside the lower 6's) And when he came back last week to remove two displaced caps from the same horse (now 5), the horse behaved as well as if he WAS sedated. But then, he was an expert horseman BEFORE he started training as an EDT. And why hasn't he 'qualified' - partly because it costs a small fortune to jump through the hoops - and partly because he thinks they won't understand him, lol. (He is French - been here years but still sounds like a Froggy!)
 

equi

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Im not sure what it is about my area but i can get a dentist easier than i can get a farrier. My main EDT i use for the minis (because i can go to the EDTs clinic) is also a vet so can sedate and do surgery etc which is handy if you have tricky horses. The one i used for Jed was from the same clinic and almost as good but never quite, so i was going to start taking him to the clinic. The new yard im at dentist is who i use now and he is great (and easy on the eye!!!!!!) which saves me trailering to the clinic. If these two were not available i also have the option of another who is also equally as good.
 

equi

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I have never seen an EDT who just uses just manual rasps. That can not be a choice or stlye. An EDT must use both properly. That is telling like -I just use summer tyres even winter times in Scotland-
So very true. Any EDT i have used has used both. First time i had a horses teeth done it as by a vet (the "best" in the country") and he literally rasped once or twice and said his teeth are okay.. Horse was chomping the whole time so the rasp literally did not move. I then used someone advertised as an EDT and they used the rasp to gauge the horses reaction then the power tools + rasps and all was fine. I only know them to use both power tools and when needed rasps...my current EDT for jed used the power tool to balance a little on his bad side but after a short time decided he would prefer to rasp him as he felt Jed was more comfortable that way, and spent i would say 40mins or more using rasps (when a power would have done the job in half the time)

I took on a mini who had never seen the dentist in 13years (eeeek!) and without power tools there is no way he would have been able to get sorted as fast.
 

Gamebird

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lol, wouldn't like that - until my ruddy brilliant EDT gets around to jumping through the vet's hoops. I have had several vets do teeth who were appalling: wouldn't do teeth without sedation, and missed obvious problems that caused serious problems. My 'unqualified' EDT has been invited to deliver dental training to vets in 2 European countries - and invited back. He has only ONCE (doing more than 40 of my horses, including 3-4 year olds for the first time) required sedation - and that was for the horse's safety as he removed two totally misplaced wolf teeth on the lower jaw (risk of a nasty haemorrhage if horse 'objected'). The equine vet from my practice who came at short notice for the sedation stayed and watched with awe - he'd never seen teeth in that place (inside the lower 6's) And when he came back last week to remove two displaced caps from the same horse (now 5), the horse behaved as well as if he WAS sedated. But then, he was an expert horseman BEFORE he started training as an EDT. And why hasn't he 'qualified' - partly because it costs a small fortune to jump through the hoops - and partly because he thinks they won't understand him, lol. (He is French - been here years but still sounds like a Froggy!)
The problem is, I'm afraid, that being unqualified means that a lot of what you have described him doing is actually illegal, regardless of how good he is. Removing wolf teeth is a Cat 2 procedure and only legal when carried out by a vet, or a QUALIFIED EDT under direct and continuous veterinary supervision. That's any wolf teeth, not just 'complicated' ones. And removal of ANY wolf teeth should involve local anaesthetic/sedation. Unqualified EDTs, regardless of experience, are limited by law to performing minimal rasping of healthy teeth by hand only. They cannot use powered instruments and they cannot work on large overgrowths or any abnormalities.

As the chap in question is very recognisable from your post (I know who you're talking about, and I live at the other end of the country) it might be wise to delete it.
 
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