How much does the presentation of a horse affect your opinion when viewing?

QueenDee_

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After spending a few hours this evening trying to get my horse into a presentable state for someone to come and view him tomorrow I was wondering how much does the presentation affect your impression of the horse when viewing(as in buying)?

I remember as a child i'd spend hours polishing and scrubbing my ponies until they gleamed whenever someone was coming to see them, hoof oil and all! However I find i'm a lot lazier now and haven't washed my grey this evening but have trimmed his feathers/tail and pulled his mane so hes at least presentable :D
 

ibot

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hi


when i went to see my horse 3 years ago he had just come in from the field and he was really dirty.
the girl basically said if i could not see what a lovely horse he was under the mud then i was not right for the horse. i fell head over hills in love with him then and every day since i look at him and thank my stars that i have him (is that too mushy :eek:)
good luck tomorrow xxx
 

Holly Hocks

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I would rather see the horse "au naturel". When I went to see my youngster she was out in a muddy field looking all forlorn. The seller wanted me to see that she was good to handle, wanted me to groom her etc so that I could see for myself what she was like - did the trick because I took her there and then!

I would be suspicious of going to see a horse that was all tarted up - it does nothing whatsoever for me.
 

Goldenstar

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If you can't be bothered to present me with a clean well turned out horse to view I think what else do you scrimp on. It tells me everything I need to know about the attitude of the seller of the horse . Sorry you won't like that but it's a big negative from me I might still buy the horse but it gives me ( to my mind ) the right to play hardball with the price.
And I will walk away without a second thought I prefer to respect the people I buy from.
 

indie999

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I dont care about the surroundings, the horse appearance , just that they are not nasty(people and horse) and the horse does what I want it for.

It could be a rubbish tip and the horse could be the muddiest monster ever!! I would rather pick its feet, brush tack up etc etc to see horses responses ie to face/legs etc etc.
 
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When viewing, I like the horse to be out in it's field because I like to see how they are to catch. Mud doesn't bother me as it can be brushed off, but bad to catch horses are so frustrating.
 

LouS

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I always bath mine and have them trimmed and pulled etc, its just how I feel things should be done, showing the horse at its best.

It probably wouldn't put me off when looking if the horse was a bit dirty but it would make me wonder how bothered the sellers were with it. A trimmed/pulled/bathed horse can look a lot different to a hairy, scruffy, muddy one, just not a good first impression for me I'm afraid.
 

Pearlsasinger

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I'm another who can see past a bit of mud. I'm going to look at the horse and decide whether it would be suitable for me and what I want to do with it, I'm not really interested in how much grooming the owner has done. If I want a pulled mane, I'll pull it myself. In fact I've bought 2 who had just been brought out of a field and hosed off.
But then I always laugh at the house-buying programmes on TV when they comment on the furniture - you're not buying the bl**dy sofa!
 

Capriole

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I like to see a smart well presented horse, but I can see through a bit of hair and dirt if not.
Went to see a nice 3 yr old the other week, had spent the winter up on the hills and was only brought down for us to see, so hairy and scruffy looking. Didnt really bother me either way tbh.
I see the vendors and their horses at shows and gradings and am happy with the way they run things, so dont look poorly on them showing us a horse in the rough.
 

Sparkles

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Long as they're 'correct' under whatever may be there [underweight/muddy/hairy/etc] then I don't care dependant on price. I ignore the superficial parts and providing it's got the right basics underneath, can generally see what it could be in 6 months time hopefully :)
 
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You see I once got told this (true) tale of horse selling. My friend's Mum had a nice gelding for sale at £x to take into account that he was a bit rusty with his schooling and had lived out all winter. Lady came to see him and liked him, but said he wasn't quite what she was after. Friend's Mum says his half brother is also for sale and would she like to view him? Lady says yes and a viewing is arranged for a couple of weeks time. So the gelding is clipped, trimmed, tarted up and schooled every day. Moved to the yard down the lane for viewing and the lady loves him and buys him for £x + £1k.

Same flipping horse and she didn't notice!
 

AdorableAlice

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I guess it's dependent on what the horse is advertised as and the amount of money involved.

The last time I bought for myself I had a healthy sum and wanted a competition horse working at top end of elem/medium, so I would not have expected to chip the mud off when I went to try him.

He was produced at the other end of extreme and presented to me plaited with white tape and bandages and a skin I could see my reflection in. That did not stop me untacking him after trying him, washing him off, rugging and taking for a pick of grass. I also hacked him out looking like a dogs dinner and took him playing with lorries outside the yard.

I always arrive at the potential purchase's yard a good 30 to 45 minutes earlier than they are expecting me, and have been met with many an interesting sight. The funniest being the for sale horse being lunged and pulling it's handler over and legging it. The saddest being a vendor coming out of the stable with a tub of acp.

Buyer beware !
 

zoelouisem

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I think also depends on what your selling, i sold a kids pony a few weeks ago. I left him in the field untill they got there. He was been sold as a first ridden good to handle pony so we all went together and the kids lead in groomed ect and tacked up. I wanted them to see that as its just as important as the riding in that sort of pony. He was however bathed and tidied the day before so he was in a reasonable state even coming in from the field.

When i was selling my showjumper quite a few years back it was cleaned and hoof oiled ect on the viewers arrival as i they were looking for a smart looking jumping horse not so much worried abouthow he stood to be groomed.

Both sold to first viewers for full asking price so must have been doing somthing right!!;)
 

Enfys

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I always arrive at the potential purchase's yard a good 30 to 45 minutes earlier than they are expecting me, and have been met with many an interesting sight. The funniest being the for sale horse being lunged and pulling it's handler over and legging it. The saddest being a vendor coming out of the stable with a tub of acp.

Buyer beware !
Indeed.:) I can imagine that all sorts of tricks are tried.

If someone arrived for an appointment that early at my yard they'd probably have to cool their heels and wait for me.

Mostly I show straight from the field, but that doesn't mean that they haven't been washed, trimmed and tidied the day before. ;) My motley crew (mainly under 2 years) are all advertised as good to catch, not herd bound etc, and I think it is important that viewers see that for themselves.
 
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Hen

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I don't expect a horse to be absolutely pristine but if I am there to look at a 'competition horse' I do want to see its potential without layers of mud, most important is the condition. A poorly conditioned horse is a reflection of what its owner thinks of it, so for me, presentation (or lack of) is indicative of the seller's interest level in the horse.
 

Delta99

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If you can't be bothered to present me with a clean well turned out horse to view I think what else do you scrimp on. It tells me everything I need to know about the attitude of the seller of the horse . Sorry you won't like that but it's a big negative from me I might still buy the horse but it gives me ( to my mind ) the right to play hardball with the price.
And I will walk away without a second thought I prefer to respect the people I buy from.
I'm the complete opposite, I walk away from anything that is shown to me sparkley clean, plaited with a white numnah and bandages... You know instantly that the asking price is at least 2k more than the horse is worth!

I really don't care if the horse is covered in mud, it's paces and temperament I'm interested in and just because it's 'tarted up' I won't buy it if it moves like a donkey on 3 legs.
 

RunToEarth

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If it is a project horse or a youngster it can look as feral as you like, if im going to look a horse that is supposed to be ready to get on and do the business I would expect it to be pulled trimmed and clean and a reflection of its price, slightly like a house viewing- buy a project usually looks a state, buy something ready to move into should look the business.
 

Batgirl

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As a few others have said it depends on what I am shopping for.

youngster - would rather see it straight from the field and brush of anything obstructing the view

most other horses - well groomed but naked wouldn't want to see it already tacked up as would always want to see how it moved on the ground and how it was to tack up/pick feet out

That said I wouldn't let the odd stain or bit of dust put me of a potential horse, as it was said, if a bit of dirt puts a potential buyer off do you really want them to have your horse?
 

Goldenstar

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I'm the complete opposite, I walk away from anything that is shown to me sparkley clean, plaited with a white numnah and bandages... You know instantly that the asking price is at least 2k more than the horse is worth!

I really don't care if the horse is covered in mud, it's paces and temperament I'm interested in and just because it's 'tarted up' I won't buy it if it moves like a donkey on 3 legs.
After forty years at this i am not likely to be won over by a set of white bandages and a plaited mane I only ever pay what I think a horse is worth to me I am pretty disinterested by what people want for there horses .
I not keen on giving money to people who can't be bothered to groom the horse for me to view it , theres always another.
And I have never bought a horse that moved like a donkey on three legs.
 

Littlelegs

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As already said, youngsters & projects i'm not fussed, but for decent money I'd expect the horse to be turned out correctly.
 

Cinnamontoast

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I'd make an effort! When I viewed mine, he was stood in the pouring rain, dirty, covered in bot eggs: I knew he was the one right then!
 

Syrah

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I'd want a bit of effort on first viewing but would ask for straight from field on the second and would expect to see some mud if there is any.
 

Luci07

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After forty years at this i am not likely to be won over by a set of white bandages and a plaited mane I only ever pay what I think a horse is worth to me I am pretty disinterested by what people want for there horses .
I not keen on giving money to people who can't be bothered to groom the horse for me to view it , theres always another.
And I have never bought a horse that moved like a donkey on three legs.
See I am with you on this. Appreciate babies are different, but if I am going to see a horse I expect it to be tidy and well presented. I am also of the opinion that I'd the vendor cant be bothered when trying to sell the horse, what else do they scrimp on? When I sold horses, I make sure they are trimmed, clean tack and clean horse. And as for being dismissive about white bandages....think you will find those of us who are old school would insist on seeing horse stripped down before riding it ! And with no hay in its stable and to assess how it is on the ground before it was even trotted up.
 

noodle_

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mine had just come in from the field - had been living out for a few days

dosent bother me a bit of mud :)

however........! if i was spending 5-10k + i woudl expect a horse to be immaculate.
 

mandwhy

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I would not like it if the horse was tacked up by the time I got there and would probably specify that I would like to be there when it is caught from field etc. It makes sense to give it a bit of brush yourself so you can get an idea of what it is like on the ground, even if you have people do that for you at livery. I can understand it is different when spending many thousands though!

I think ideally I would like to see that some attention has been paid to the horse, if it was a house I would like it to be tidyish but 'lived in' same with a horse I think!
 

Fiona clark

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What colour is your horse? A mucky grey can remind somone that they may have to tackle stable stains lol! I would think it can depend on their financial value too although my horse was under weight and a bit scurfy when I bought her but her paces were worth the extra pennies x
 

Tiasmum

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You see I once got told this (true) tale of horse selling. My friend's Mum had a nice gelding for sale at £x to take into account that he was a bit rusty with his schooling and had lived out all winter. Lady came to see him and liked him, but said he wasn't quite what she was after. Friend's Mum says his half brother is also for sale and would she like to view him? Lady says yes and a viewing is arranged for a couple of weeks time. So the gelding is clipped, trimmed, tarted up and schooled every day. Moved to the yard down the lane for viewing and the lady loves him and buys him for £x + £1k.

Same flipping horse and she didn't notice!
unbelievable lol :eek:
 

Lolo

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Even for a cheapy I'd want it to be well presented. I reckon that some of the scruffier dragon driving ponies could have quite a lot added to their value with a good groom and trim up so they looked smart. Add in a few weeks schooling and adding £1k doesn't even seem that silly... If a horse was presented to me covered in mud/ stable stains with a tangled and scruffy mane and tail I'd would not be impressed unless there was a reason/ it was stupendously cheap (so £600 or less).
 
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