Hunting is in a spot of bother

minesadouble

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This was a pack hunting on foot, mixed pack hold both mounted and foot hunts depending where they are hunting.
A mixed pack normally refers to the hounds being a mix of dogs and bitches rather than a same sex pack.
Do you mind me asking which pack? It must be interesting country if they hold some meets on foot. Just being nosey so no worries if you'd rather not say.
 

Tiddlypom

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Another horse dies after an accident in his field after being panicked when the hunt made an unexpected visit. The owner would have got her horses in beforehand if she had known that the hunt was coming.

https://www.echo-news.co.uk/news/19849997.horse-put-bolting-fox-hunt-hounds/


A HUNT has “offered its condolences” after its hounds raced on to private land and scared a horse which subsequently had to be put down.

Lisa Line’s horse, Barney, who lived in the Grove Estate, Wormingford, was panicked when about 40 dogs gained access to the land without permission.

The animal, which Lisa had loved for 21 years since it was four-months-old, bolted and ran straight through a gate on the land, breaking its leg.


The family had to make the heartbreaking decision to have Barney put down after he laid in agony on the floor for more than 40 minutes.

So there you go, to the poster who opined that horses don't bother when the hunt comes past, and thought that their neighbour who wanted to be told was being over protective and was making a fuss.

This is what happens, and this is why I always expect to be told when the hunt is coming so that I can get my horses in.
 

Koweyka

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I was going to share this but I was so utterly disgusted and angry I couldn’t bare it. I see it all the time, horses terrified and galloping madly around, there is no regard for anyone else’s animals, so determined to get their kicks and keep the meet a secret, they play Russian roulette, poor horse and owner.
 
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I was brought up hunting every weekend and continued hunting avidly into adulthood. However... I had my head in a denial cloud. Then, briefly, I was in a relationship with a huntsman and saw a number of horrendous acts of cruelty on the front lines, not just with foxes but to horses and hounds too...
I couldn't in good conscience continue hunting after this experience and hung up my boots years ago. Much as I love the beauty and tradition of hunting, I think it has seen its day.
 

Tiddlypom

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'A spokesperson for the Essex and Suffolk Hunt confirmed it was aware of the incident which took place while it hunted in Wormingford.'

If the going rate for a cat killed by a hunt is a cheap bottle of whisky and a new kitten, what is the going rate for a much loved old coloured cob who has been in the family for over 20 years?

Barney pictured here with his owner's children before his tragic and completely unnecessary death. What a lovely sort he was.


95B3E2A9-F440-433B-8F17-8DBD27CA68B3.jpeg

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Hounds out of control and where they shouldn't be AGAIN. Hunting and its governance is a joke.
 

PurBee

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Before I give up on this discussion entirely (again!) please, please can someone explain to me why a truly minority activity around animal welfare, which is important to me, commands so much attention when there are massively significant animal welfare issues that need all the manpower they can get. I mean the scale of some welfare issues totally dwarf any amount of illegal hunting yet there are clearly people who have dedicated their lives to anti-hunting activities. Why do the animal welfare issues around hunting prove such a potent driving force for some people? The animal welfare issue is clear to me but there seem so many more significant welfare problems to address. Anti hunter and pro hunters agree that hunting is a minority activity too. I am asking this question absolutely sincerely and because no-one from an anti-hunting perspective has ever managed to answer that question.
You think hunting is getting all the attention because, as you say, it’s an issue that‘s important to you, so you’re only seeing a narrow perspective of animal rights activists activities, only within the hunting scene.

Many other animal welfare issues are being ’sabbed’ too. I know someone who does media for major and minor animal rights groups and the protests/meets/exposes are extremely regular….you mostly won’t hear about them as they rarely hit mainstream news, unlike hunting. This also wrongly gives the impression that its just fox hunts getting all the focus by sabs, and animal welfare agents.

The meat industry is always a hot focus, and the outing of farms not keeping animals as per regulations are regularly evidenced and published. Again, rarely make mainstream news so hardly anyone is aware of these issues, and how many ‘super farms’ employ 24/7 security to prevent access by ‘sabs’.

The groups are very well organised, and many have more experience and knowledge with one issue than others. Its therefore rare to see hunt sabs at fur farming street protests, as they generally focus on their ‘speciality industry’. There are some cross-industry animal rights workers but those ‘out in the field’ obtaining evidence generally stick to that particular subject of animal welfare concerns.

Some methods sabs use, i dont always agree with, as it doesnt ultimately achieve the objective of advancing animal welfare, and just causes everyone to become disgruntled. Sabbing probably has become more commonplace due to the mainstream media blocking publishing evidence provided to them by animal welfare groups - so then these groups ‘get out there’ and hit the fields/streets with banners and cameras/video displays to try to make the issues known.

If the press were truly the ‘free press’ , jo public would have more general knowledge/information regarding for example, the methods the meat industry raises the animals. Many on here have stated in threads here and there to prefer their local organic farmer meat or shot wild meat than buying supermarket meat, as they have at least some knowledge of the inferior quality meat available through most mainstream meat industry chains of supply.

All industries raising animals for the pleasure of human sports or diet, are in the sights of all animal welfare groups.
To think otherwise is folly yet understandable as the media controls the mindset of the nation, and fox hunting has made it into mainstream media of late.
 
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YorksG

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Regarding "sabs" other than in hunting, we locally had two stand out events. One was the release of thousands of mink, with horrific consequences for both the mink and the local wildlife. The other was the arson at an intensive poultry farm, where all the hens were killed, along with three South Devon bulls, whose overnight housing was destroyed in the out of control fire. How either of those events were based on animal welfare is beyond me! It is a form of terrorism, imo
 

Miss_Millie

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Regarding "sabs" other than in hunting, we locally had two stand out events. One was the release of thousands of mink, with horrific consequences for both the mink and the local wildlife. The other was the arson at an intensive poultry farm, where all the hens were killed, along with three South Devon bulls, whose overnight housing was destroyed in the out of control fire. How either of those events were based on animal welfare is beyond me! It is a form of terrorism, imo
Is this to deflect from the fact that a hunt has killed yet another horse, once again trespassing on private property?

(FYI I don't condone either of the above that you have mentioned, however I find it very telling that those who are pro hunt go quiet whenever an innocent, by standing animal is killed by hounds)
 

paddy555

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Is this to deflect from the fact that a hunt has killed yet another horse, once again trespassing on private property?

(FYI I don't condone either of the above that you have mentioned, however I find it very telling that those who are pro hunt go quiet whenever an innocent, by standing animal is killed by hounds)
I can't find any comments about the "Barney" incident from the pro hunting folk, Palo, Yorks G and some others. I expect they are very busy and just hadn't had time to read about this unfortunate incident yet. I would have expected a couple of posts offering condolences, as indeed I offer mine, but I must have missed them. :(

If any of them do have any time to spare it would be nice to understand why hunting folk believe it is OK to let dogs (hounds) run around the countryside totally out of control across other people's property. I am especially interested in this particular aspect of hunting as the same thing happened to me except it was my dog I very nearly lost not a horse.

Would be nice to know as well why the hunts don't take the trouble to notify the people in the area where they are hunting so they can take steps to minimise the danger to their animals.
 

Miss_Millie

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I can't find any comments about the "Barney" incident from the pro hunting folk, Palo, Yorks G and some others. I expect they are very busy and just hadn't had time to read about this unfortunate incident yet. I would have expected a couple of posts offering condolences, as indeed I offer mine, but I must have missed them. :(

If any of them do have any time to spare it would be nice to understand why hunting folk believe it is OK to let dogs (hounds) run around the countryside totally out of control across other people's property. I am especially interested in this particular aspect of hunting as the same thing happened to me except it was my dog I very nearly lost not a horse.

Would be nice to know as well why the hunts don't take the trouble to notify the people in the area where they are hunting so they can take steps to minimise the danger to their animals.
Your poor dog, I hope he/she has made a full recovery.
 

GoldenWillow

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Another horse dies after an accident in his field after being panicked when the hunt made an unexpected visit. The owner would have got her horses in beforehand if she had known that the hunt was coming.

https://www.echo-news.co.uk/news/19849997.horse-put-bolting-fox-hunt-hounds/


A HUNT has “offered its condolences” after its hounds raced on to private land and scared a horse which subsequently had to be put down.

Lisa Line’s horse, Barney, who lived in the Grove Estate, Wormingford, was panicked when about 40 dogs gained access to the land without permission.

The animal, which Lisa had loved for 21 years since it was four-months-old, bolted and ran straight through a gate on the land, breaking its leg.

The family had to make the heartbreaking decision to have Barney put down after he laid in agony on the floor for more than 40 minutes.

So there you go, to the poster who opined that horses don't bother when the hunt comes past, and thought that their neighbour who wanted to be told was being over protective and was making a fuss.

This is what happens, and this is why I always expect to be told when the hunt is coming so that I can get my horses in.
That is absolutely heartbreaking and completely needless if hunts were actually trail hunting. I could so easily have been writing this, "fortunately" I just had a wrecked field and a horse in a dreadful state.
 

palo1

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I can't find any comments about the "Barney" incident from the pro hunting folk, Palo, Yorks G and some others. I expect they are very busy and just hadn't had time to read about this unfortunate incident yet. I would have expected a couple of posts offering condolences, as indeed I offer mine, but I must have missed them. :(

If any of them do have any time to spare it would be nice to understand why hunting folk believe it is OK to let dogs (hounds) run around the countryside totally out of control across other people's property. I am especially interested in this particular aspect of hunting as the same thing happened to me except it was my dog I very nearly lost not a horse.

Would be nice to know as well why the hunts don't take the trouble to notify the people in the area where they are hunting so they can take steps to minimise the danger to their animals.
I was very sad to hear about the death of that much loved horse and it is horrifying that that incident happened. I can honestly say that I have NEVER, whilst I have been trail hunting, seen any wildlife, livestock or pets upset or endangered. There isn't an excuse for it. The country should be cleared adequately which absolutely includes letting people know that the hunt will be in the area and hounds should never be rioting on pets or wildlife. I know that as soon as I post this, numerous anti-hunt posters will leap on this and tell me I am deluded, dissembling, probably lying... but I can only speak of my experience. Many people I speak to involved in trail hunting would say the same as I but this incident has made the headlines. I wish every incident of out of control dogs made the headlines tbh as pets, wildlife and livestock would all be safer but that doesn't happen.

I have had a few people tell me, when they are informed of trail hunt activities, that their horses will be upset (we don't get the same response from farmers at all as they either welcome us or don't and we know that we must act very carefully around any livestock in the fields). Invariably, we pass by quietly at some point in the day and there is no problem. If there were a problem, we would try to deal with that in whatever way we could - moving away, going to inform a homeowner that their animals were razzing around, apologising for not being able to let them know we were passing - whatever was the best course of action. I don't know anyone at all that would feel it acceptable to think or see a dangerously upset horse. We are all horse owners and lovers too. Some horses will get wound up - I get that but perhaps our country enables us to steer clear of that kind of environment. My experience is so different to that represented by anti-hunters and sabs that I regularly question why that is the case. I am sick of hearing about these awful incidents tbh and obviously I wish that hunts would exert better control and discipline when they are in more residential places/around people's homes. Nothing I have seen suggests that can't be done and I regularly see a great level of control and discipline in trail hunting in places where there are NOT problems. That is just my experience; sorry if it doesn't fit other people's narratives.

I do wonder too how drag hunts and bloodhound hunts avoid these kinds of headlines as drag-hunting in particular is far more exciting and attracts quite large numbers of riders. They often meet in villages and quite well populated areas and horses out in the fields really wouldn't know the difference between a drag or trail hunt. The drag hunts I have attended have used bridlepaths etc and drag hounds can move off the direct line of the scent trail so there is opportunity for them to cause upset too. Bloodhounds are huge great things and scent can move quite a bit so the same applies to them. The drag hunt I have been out with has not always been able to inform everyone of their plans either so it isn't always possible for every horse owner to get the information they might want or need prior to hunting activities.
 
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rextherobber

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I can't find any comments about the "Barney" incident from the pro hunting folk, Palo, Yorks G and some others. I expect they are very busy and just hadn't had time to read about this unfortunate incident yet. I would have expected a couple of posts offering condolences, as indeed I offer mine, but I must have missed them. :(

If any of them do have any time to spare it would be nice to understand why hunting folk believe it is OK to let dogs (hounds) run around the countryside totally out of control across other people's property. I am especially interested in this particular aspect of hunting as the same thing happened to me except it was my dog I very nearly lost not a horse.

Would be nice to know as well why the hunts don't take the trouble to notify the people in the area where they are hunting so they can take steps to minimise the danger to their animals.
Absolutely this
 

CanteringCarrot

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Regarding "sabs" other than in hunting, we locally had two stand out events. One was the release of thousands of mink, with horrific consequences for both the mink and the local wildlife. The other was the arson at an intensive poultry farm, where all the hens were killed, along with three South Devon bulls, whose overnight housing was destroyed in the out of control fire. How either of those events were based on animal welfare is beyond me! It is a form of terrorism, imo
I think Sabs can be considered an extremist group in many cases, such as in the examples you posted. I do think Sabs range in their "extremism" too and not all take it to the same level. I'm not supporting Sabs, terrorism, or heinous acts, but I do support people being able to speak out against hunting, and peaceful (as well as legal) protests. However, when this BS (yes, it's BS) like the horrible situation just mentioned in this thread re the panicked horse that was put down keeps happening, and no one listens/virtually nothing is done about it, people get p'd off. If the hunts are acting ridiculous the sabs will act ridiculous and the cycle continues.

Now I know some hunts may not partake in ridiculousness and/or BS, and I know some Sabs are well over the top. I don't discount that for a second. Sabs are wrong and many hunts are in the wrong. The sport is going to have to do a lot, as in kick itself in the arse and put in effort to be proper and transparent. If people aren't willing to do that, then it's done and should be done.

I know it just plain sucks to have to be a "good one" and suffer the consequences of the bad eggs, but it happens and you can't expect the general public to put up with this stuff because some hunts are good and some are bad. It just cannot work that way.

I'm not against legal hunting, but I'm having a real hard time with the thought of hunting, as it is now, continuing.
 

CanteringCarrot

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I was very sad to hear about the death of that much loved horse and it is horrifying that that incident happened. I can honestly say that I have NEVER, whilst I have been trail hunting, seen any wildlife, livestock or pets upset or endangered. There isn't an excuse for it. The country should be cleared adequately which absolutely includes letting people know that the hunt will be in the area and hounds should never be rioting on pets or wildlife. I know that as soon as I post this, numerous anti-hunt posters will leap on this and tell me I am deluded, dissembling, probably lying... but I can only speak of my experience. Many people I speak to involved in trail hunting would say the same as I but this incident has made the headlines. I wish every incident of out of control dogs made the headlines tbh as pets, wildlife and livestock would all be safer but that doesn't happen.

I have had a few people tell me, when they are informed of trail hunt activities, that their horses will be upset (we don't get the same response from farmers at all as they either welcome us or don't and we know that we must act very carefully around any livestock in the fields). Invariably, we pass by quietly at some point in the day and there is no problem. If there were a problem, we would try to deal with that in whatever way we could - moving away, going to inform a homeowner that their animals were razzing around, apologising for not being able to let them know we were passing - whatever was the best course of action. I don't know anyone at all that would feel it acceptable to think or see a dangerously upset horse. We are all horse owners and lovers too. Some horses will get wound up - I get that but perhaps our country enables us to steer clear of that kind of environment. My experience is so different to that represented by anti-hunters and sabs that I regularly question why that is the case. I am sick of hearing about these awful incidents tbh and obviously I wish that hunts would exert better control and discipline when they are in more residential places/around people's homes. Nothing I have seen suggests that can't be done and I regularly see a great level of control and discipline in trail hunting in places where there are NOT problems. That is just my experience; sorry if it doesn't fit other people's narratives.
If that's truly your experience, I do feel bad that you have these other idiots ruining it.
 

GoldenWillow

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I was very sad to hear about the death of that much loved horse and it is horrifying that that incident happened. I can honestly say that I have NEVER, whilst I have been trail hunting, seen any wildlife, livestock or pets upset or endangered. There isn't an excuse for it. The country should be cleared adequately which absolutely includes letting people know that the hunt will be in the area and hounds should never be rioting on pets or wildlife. I know that as soon as I post this, numerous anti-hunt posters will leap on this and tell me I am deluded, dissembling, probably lying... but I can only speak of my experience. Many people I speak to involved in trail hunting would say the same as I but this incident has made the headlines. I wish every incident of out of control dogs made the headlines tbh as pets, wildlife and livestock would all be safer but that doesn't happen.

I have had a few people tell me, when they are informed of trail hunt activities, that their horses will be upset (we don't get the same response from farmers at all as they either welcome us or don't and we know that we must act very carefully around any livestock in the fields). Invariably, we pass by quietly at some point in the day and there is no problem. If there were a problem, we would try to deal with that in whatever way we could - moving away, going to inform a homeowner that their animals were razzing around, apologising for not being able to let them know we were passing - whatever was the best course of action. I don't know anyone at all that would feel it acceptable to think or see a dangerously upset horse. We are all horse owners and lovers too. Some horses will get wound up - I get that but perhaps our country enables us to steer clear of that kind of environment. My experience is so different to that represented by anti-hunters and sabs that I regularly question why that is the case. I am sick of hearing about these awful incidents tbh and obviously I wish that hunts would exert better control and discipline when they are in more residential places/around people's homes. Nothing I have seen suggests that can't be done and I regularly see a great level of control and discipline in trail hunting in places where there are NOT problems. That is just my experience; sorry if it doesn't fit other people's narratives.
I think we both have to accept that not all hunts behave the same way. If our hunt behaved anything like yours I would have no problem at all with hunts, after all my life not having a strong opinion either way about hunting my local hunts behaviour is the reason I now have such strong feelings.

We are in a very rural area, the hunt had over 1000 acres to go on yet went right through my field which is in a small pocket of 30 acres which the hunt had no permission to go. They went through and left a very distressed horse. I also was unfortunate enough to meet hunt followers when I was out hacking, horse was extremely upset as he could hear the hounds in the distance and the jeers, cat calls, downright offensive comments along with pushing past with their vehicles revving hard gets me as angry now as it did at the time. They were so bad two farmers who's farms I was passing came out to see what was happening and gave them short shrift.

This is my experience and I do feel that's it's as valid as yours.

There is no reason that I can see that all hunts cannot behave as yours does, other than they don't want to or see no reason why they should alter anything they do. Interestingly I was speaking to my neighbouring farmer today about foxes and they have neither less or more problems with them now the hunt doesn't come over.
 

Gallop_Away

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Another horse dies after an accident in his field after being panicked when the hunt made an unexpected visit. The owner would have got her horses in beforehand if she had known that the hunt was coming.

https://www.echo-news.co.uk/news/19849997.horse-put-bolting-fox-hunt-hounds/


A HUNT has “offered its condolences” after its hounds raced on to private land and scared a horse which subsequently had to be put down.

Lisa Line’s horse, Barney, who lived in the Grove Estate, Wormingford, was panicked when about 40 dogs gained access to the land without permission.

The animal, which Lisa had loved for 21 years since it was four-months-old, bolted and ran straight through a gate on the land, breaking its leg.

The family had to make the heartbreaking decision to have Barney put down after he laid in agony on the floor for more than 40 minutes.

So there you go, to the poster who opined that horses don't bother when the hunt comes past, and thought that their neighbour who wanted to be told was being over protective and was making a fuss.

This is what happens, and this is why I always expect to be told when the hunt is coming so that I can get my horses in.
Terribly sad and completely unacceptable. The hounds should never have been let loose on ground they were not permitted to be on.
Like palo's hunt I can honestly say I've never experienced this with my own hunt. Our master and whips would have recalled and gathered the hounds the second it seemed they could potentially stray onto the wrong ground.
Much of our ground is private land and we pride ourselves on having excellent relationships with our land owners. Part of this is keeping land owners and their neighbours happy by not trespassing where we are not welcome and communicating via our land owners and masters to neighbours and locals that we are in the area and on what day.
I can honestly say our masters would be devastated if this had happened on their watch and rightly so.
Condolences to that poor family who have lost their beautiful boy.
 

Chianti

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'A spokesperson for the Essex and Suffolk Hunt confirmed it was aware of the incident which took place while it hunted in Wormingford.'

If the going rate for a cat killed by a hunt is a cheap bottle of whisky and a new kitten, what is the going rate for a much loved old coloured cob who has been in the family for over 20 years?

Barney pictured here with his owner's children before his tragic and completely unnecessary death. What a lovely sort he was.


View attachment 85901

View attachment 85902

Hounds out of control and where they shouldn't be AGAIN. Hunting and its governance is a joke.
Look at his eyes in the first photo. He looks such a sweetheart. If that happened to my pony I would want to kill someone.
 

paddy555

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Terribly sad and completely unacceptable. The hounds should never have been let loose on ground they were not permitted to be on.
Like palo's hunt I can honestly say I've never experienced this with my own hunt. Our master and whips would have recalled and gathered the hounds the second it seemed they could potentially stray onto the wrong ground.
Much of our ground is private land and we pride ourselves on having excellent relationships with our land owners. Part of this is keeping land owners and their neighbours happy by not trespassing where we are not welcome and communicating via our land owners and masters to neighbours and locals that we are in the area and on what day.
I can honestly say our masters would be devastated if this had happened on their watch and rightly so.
Condolences to that poor family who have lost their beautiful boy.
you and Palo seem to live in a lovely totally mystical world devoid of all reality to the real one that I, and I think some others do. Have neither of you really and totally truly not seen hounds stray onto private land?

Many out of control dogs make the headlines. 40 out of control dogs here. The onus is on the hunts to keep their dogs under control. If they were under control they would not be going across land without permission, they would not be frightening horses, killing cats or causing any other damage. A responsible hunt would have made sure Barney's owner was aware of the route of the hunt..After all if they were trail hunting they must surely have known.

One of my horses did have the right idea of how to deal with the problem. Hounds made the bad mistake of running, uninvited, across his field. Off he went, the hound he had set his heart on was very lucky that day. The horse pursued him at a gallop across my concrete yard (which was scary for the horse) cornered the hound on the back doorstep and started to kick seven bells out of it. I did stop him and got the hound out, after all it was not it's fault that the person supposedly looking after it and in charge of it's safety had failed it.

the hunt have never in warned me my horses were galloping around as a result of their activities. In fact the master who got called out after their last episode didn't even know which my land was nor who owned the adjacent land that his dogs had trespassed over. I wasn't sure how long we had to own it before they recognised the fact. 40 years seemed reasonable but perhaps not.

Neither you nor Palo can explain how 40 dogs could be out of control on someone's field. How could this possibly happen.
The only way I can think of is that the hunt couldn't care less or alternatively were incapable of controlling them. Neither should be happening and as far as I can see the only way of preventing this happening again is a total overall ban.
Many people don't care if this is fox hunting, drag, trail or any other sort of hunting they just don't want it to happen and there seems no other way to prevent it.

For those who are hunting and don't appear to have problems then look to the hunts that are letting you down not the antis. What action will be taken against the master and huntsman as a result of Barney's death?
 

Gallop_Away

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you and Palo seem to live in a lovely totally mystical world devoid of all reality to the real one that I, and I think some others do. Have neither of you really and totally truly not seen hounds stray onto private land?

Many out of control dogs make the headlines. 40 out of control dogs here. The onus is on the hunts to keep their dogs under control. If they were under control they would not be going across land without permission, they would not be frightening horses, killing cats or causing any other damage. A responsible hunt would have made sure Barney's owner was aware of the route of the hunt..After all if they were trail hunting they must surely have known.

One of my horses did have the right idea of how to deal with the problem. Hounds made the bad mistake of running, uninvited, across his field. Off he went, the hound he had set his heart on was very lucky that day. The horse pursued him at a gallop across my concrete yard (which was scary for the horse) cornered the hound on the back doorstep and started to kick seven bells out of it. I did stop him and got the hound out, after all it was not it's fault that the person supposedly looking after it and in charge of it's safety had failed it.

the hunt have never in warned me my horses were galloping around as a result of their activities. In fact the master who got called out after their last episode didn't even know which my land was nor who owned the adjacent land that his dogs had trespassed over. I wasn't sure how long we had to own it before they recognised the fact. 40 years seemed reasonable but perhaps not.

Neither you nor Palo can explain how 40 dogs could be out of control on someone's field. How could this possibly happen.
The only way I can think of is that the hunt couldn't care less or alternatively were incapable of controlling them. Neither should be happening and as far as I can see the only way of preventing this happening again is a total overall ban.
Many people don't care if this is fox hunting, drag, trail or any other sort of hunting they just don't want it to happen and there seems no other way to prevent it.

For those who are hunting and don't appear to have problems then look to the hunts that are letting you down not the antis. What action will be taken against the master and huntsman as a result of Barney's death?
Paddy myself and palo can only give our own experiences. Neither of us have condoned the actions of this hunt. Quite the opposite. Neither have we attempted to blame sabs for this sad affair so I'm unsure where your last comment has come from? Just because our experience is different to yours doesn't make ours any less valid!
I can honestly say our hounds have not rioted onto livestock or pets in all the years I've hunted. Occasionally they will loose the trail but the second there is a risk they could stray onto land we are not welcome on, they are swiftly recalled by the master. I have huge respect for him and how he handles his hounds. Our whips are also excellent.
Our hunt has not killed a fox in the 7 years I have hunted with them. We rely a great deal on our land owners and we would certainly not be welcomed onto their property if we were doing anything illegal or trespassing where we were not welcome.
I've never denied that there are hunts hunting illegally and I think it is a terrible shame that they are dragging us down with them.
I'm not sure what more you would like me to say on the matter?
 

SEL

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Location
Buckinghamshire
So there you go, to the poster who opined that horses don't bother when the hunt comes past, and thought that their neighbour who wanted to be told was being over protective and was making a fuss.

This is what happens, and this is why I always expect to be told when the hunt is coming so that I can get my horses in.
That poor horse. I have two on my land that work themselves into a frenzy when the hunt come past. No warning last time the Kimblewick came down the road and, as I said further up the thread, I stood on my yard watching hounds in my top field. Hard for humans to access the thicket up there so I doubt a trail was laid.

I was on my yard with a bodyworker who had very kindly helped me turn two into my closest paddock as they were so wound up she couldn't have attempted to work on them.

If members of other hunts have never seen hounds on private land nor horses worked up into a state then you are lucky and really should pull together to address the behaviour of hunts letting the side down.
 

YorksG

Over the hill and far awa
Joined
14 September 2006
Messages
14,928
Location
West Yorkshire
If members of other hunts have never seen hounds on private land nor horses worked up into a state then you are lucky and really should pull together to address the behaviour of hunts letting the side down.
That feels rather like saying that because, say Chelsea FC have a lot of hooligans in their crowd, that Bradford fc need to alter their behaviour.
 

saalsk

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 March 2009
Messages
303
Location
Carmarthenshire
When we first moved here, the local hunt came and told us when and where they would be in our area. They could not have been more helpful and polite, and gave us plenty of notice, and a thank you after. No suggestion they did anything other than follow a trail. They didn't come on our land, but were aware there are dogs, chickens, sheep and horses here. Not seen them since lockdown, but twice (once last autumn, and then again today ) there have been hounds with men on foot (with guns and horns) hunting the area with no warning, and very little regard for where the hounds went. Last year, there were several hounds on my land, in the field with pregnant sheep (I stress they didn't look at or in anyway chase them) and another field with 2 horses (same - no chasing or any suggestion of it). However, the sheep were going crazy up and down the fenceline, as the hounds quartered the field, and they were in the area for well over an hour, then returned a little later with the same outcome. The horses were galloping around, and would have been inside if I had been told they would be in the area. Today - same thing - totally unaware and suddenly hearing horns and hounds, go outside to find them in my fields. Horses galloping around, and sheep very upset in one corner of a field. The men with guns can clearly see they are on land they do not have permission to use, and that there are sheep and horses around, but seemingly don't care, and failed to make any efforts to call them away. The fox crossed 4 of my fields, and my non-grazing grass sections, which are just metres from the house, and has the chicken coop on it, before heading away. I cannot believe the men didn't see it, as hounds were not far off the trail, and following it. They can hardly argue they were following any sort of proper trail. If they were not following a trail, what were they doing there in the first place ? Hearing the hounds, the gun shots ( there were several ) and the shouting, with no warning, and no idea who they were or what they were doing, and then being left with a flock of stressed sheep, and 2 horses lathered and heaving from running, is not acceptable. They are not helping themselves.
 

YorksG

Over the hill and far awa
Joined
14 September 2006
Messages
14,928
Location
West Yorkshire
When we first moved here, the local hunt came and told us when and where they would be in our area. They could not have been more helpful and polite, and gave us plenty of notice, and a thank you after. No suggestion they did anything other than follow a trail. They didn't come on our land, but were aware there are dogs, chickens, sheep and horses here. Not seen them since lockdown, but twice (once last autumn, and then again today ) there have been hounds with men on foot (with guns and horns) hunting the area with no warning, and very little regard for where the hounds went. Last year, there were several hounds on my land, in the field with pregnant sheep (I stress they didn't look at or in anyway chase them) and another field with 2 horses (same - no chasing or any suggestion of it). However, the sheep were going crazy up and down the fenceline, as the hounds quartered the field, and they were in the area for well over an hour, then returned a little later with the same outcome. The horses were galloping around, and would have been inside if I had been told they would be in the area. Today - same thing - totally unaware and suddenly hearing horns and hounds, go outside to find them in my fields. Horses galloping around, and sheep very upset in one corner of a field. The men with guns can clearly see they are on land they do not have permission to use, and that there are sheep and horses around, but seemingly don't care, and failed to make any efforts to call them away. The fox crossed 4 of my fields, and my non-grazing grass sections, which are just metres from the house, and has the chicken coop on it, before heading away. I cannot believe the men didn't see it, as hounds were not far off the trail, and following it. They can hardly argue they were following any sort of proper trail. If they were not following a trail, what were they doing there in the first place ? Hearing the hounds, the gun shots ( there were several ) and the shouting, with no warning, and no idea who they were or what they were doing, and then being left with a flock of stressed sheep, and 2 horses lathered and heaving from running, is not acceptable. They are not helping themselves.
They are unlikely to be a registered pack, and there is nothing that any other pack can do about them. A call to the police at the time, from the landowner, about illegal use of firearms, would have been the appropriate response imo
 
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