I just bought my first cob! Introduction + feed advice + photos!

Red-1

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Oh wow, that's pretty good going. I do enjoy watching a good tango, especially between partners with a good bond. I know you do get milongas (sp) but it's quite intimate for a "social dance" somehow
It was our first milonga for ages, but yes, very small and intimate. Familiar faces. Non threatening.

I enjoy it so much better now that I have a partner. Before, it felt a bit like a cattle market.

I started because a physical therapist I went to when in America advised it. At the time, I couldn't reach backwards with my left leg at all. It was also to tackle the fact that I didn't like to be close to people. Also, he was the dojo sensai, into aikido, in a big way, as in 7th dan black belt or something, and that is a similar inside job to horse riding, with accepting and directing energy and intent.

I became interested in aikido, enough to want to go a few times, as I had just ridden with Mark Rashid, who said he learned about horses through aikido. I went to Mark's aikido dojo in Colorado and then to this one, in Arizona, with friends, but didn't enjoy the Aikido so much. The sensai in Arizona was saying that he was seeing so many parallels in tango to aikido, and he actually was changing focus. Many of the horse students were doing aikido, I was lucky that the sensai was also a physical therapist, who I had several appointments with, and then lucky that he was seeing the benefits of tango, as tango felt so much more accessible to me.

I was teaching for some years in America, went back for several years running, and I noticed that the aikido students all were easy to teach the inside job to with their horses. They already knew the inside stillness, and intent, the directing of energy. I did some aikido lessons and then tango so I could teach better too. One time I went, I just went to visit friends and do the tango with the sensai, but by that time he was no longer the sensai, he was by then mainly practicing tango and working as a magical physical therapist (and treating my injuries while I was there).

Although, tango is a tough one to learn! If you are looking at it from the whole energy, intent, balance inside and outside perspective.

When I was still teaching and had my own website, I did a blog on tango and what I learned. I actually think it helped me be a better rider. In many ways. In tango, the lady is so much like a horse. Waiting for the invite, for a leader to come and invite, to then take control. The milonga is so much like a collecting ring, many different energies swirling round. A rhythm to your work, but also a rhythm to the whole milonga, or collecting ring.

Amazing how, some partners can direct you and make you more balanced and graceful, but some can stunt you and have you feel blind and clumsy. Some confidently direct you through a busy throng, dancing your dance but confident and sure with their attention and surity passing through touch and feel. Others become distracted and jerky, and you become less confident as to where you will go next.

It was an eye opener, and my horses benefitted.

I tend to dance only with Mr Red now.
 
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GoldenWillow

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It was our first milonga for ages, but yes, very small and intimate. Familiar faces. Non threatening.

I enjoy it so much better now that I have a partner. Before, it felt a bit like a cattle market.

I started because a physical therapist I went to when in America advised it. At the time, I couldn't reach backwards with my left leg at all. It was also to tackle the fact that I didn't like to be close to people. Also, he was the dojo sensai, into aikido, in a big way, as in 7th dan black belt or something, and that is a similar inside job to horse riding, with accepting and directing energy and intent.

I became interested in aikido, enough to want to go a few times, as I had just ridden with Mark Rashid, who said he learned about horses through aikido. I went to Mark's aikido dojo in Colorado and then to this one, in Arizona, with friends, but didn't enjoy the Aikido so much. The sensai in Arizona was saying that he was seeing so many parallels in tango to aikido, and he actually was changing focus. Many of the horse students were doing aikido, I was lucky that the sensai was also a physical therapist, who I had several appointments with, and then lucky that he was seeing the benefits of tango, as tango felt so much more accessible to me.

I was teaching for some years in America, went back for several years running, and I noticed that the aikido students all were easy to teach the inside job to with their horses. They already knew the inside stillness, and intent, the directing of energy. I did some aikido lessons and then tango so I could teach better too. One time I went, I just went to visit friends and do the tango with the sensai, but by that time he was no longer the sensai, he was by then mainly practicing tango and working as a magical physical therapist (and treating my injuries while I was there).

Although, tango is a tough one to learn! If you are looking at it from the whole energy, intent, balance inside and outside perspective.

When I was still teaching and had my own website, I did a blog on tango and what I learned. I actually think it helped me be a better rider. In many ways. In tango, the lady is so much like a horse. Waiting for the invite, for a leader to come and invite, to then take control. The milonga is so much like a collecting ring, many different energies swirling round. A rhythm to your work, but also a rhythm to the whole milonga, or collecting ring.

Amazing how, some partners can direct you and make you more balanced and graceful, but some can stunt you and have you feel blind and clumsy. Some confidently direct you through a busy throng, dancing your dance but confident and sure with their attention and surity passing through touch and feel. Others become distracted and jerky, and you become less confident as to where you will go next.

It was an eye opener, and my horses benefitted.

I tend to dance only with Mr Red now.
That is fascinating, thank you for sharing.
 

Red-1

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Rigsby did a visit to the local care home.

They have released some photos on their FB page, but I will just put this one, cropped, one here, for privacy.

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Rigsby was a star, especially for a horse who hasn't done much travel. He didn't put a foot out of place, despite feeling a little excited when we arrived. He soon walked it off, parading in the gardens, before meeting all of the residents for a pet.

I did feel a little sorry for the organiser as, when I had said I was bringing a "small horse," she had in mind something considerably smaller than Riggers. :oops:

I was also surprised to find that there were many residents who earned their living with horses, both sports and working. It was a lovely afternoon, with a garden party feel.

Rigsby is ace!
 

Red-1

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This is Rigsby's thread. I always said that I don't know what made me start it, but that it will be his alone. And it is. But I will include this photo for completeness, as it is about Rigsby.

Rigsby has a new brovver. From another movver. He is mildly curious, but still more interested in food. He is, however, glad that retirement in the truest sense is near! He will be used as an accompanying hack until the new one is going confidently, but then his job is done.

With the horrors of dealing with a parent with dementia, I became not resilient at all. I lost the fun of horses. I was easily overwhelmed.

I deliberately scoured Preloved for the most broken horse I could find, but that still had potential to make a gentle ridden horse, and I found Rigsby. In about 20 days' time, he will have been here a year.

I feel that Rigsby has reassembled the shattered pieces. He was not easy, oh no, he was bullish and opinionated. That actually helped me, as I could see that I could still train a horse. He is a master trainer, Rigsby. Threw enough at me that I sometimes felt stretched, but worked with me too.

The OAP visit was the day before I got the new one. Rigsby's full circle. He was mannerly. He had cast a new life for himself.

Clever Rigsby.

Now he is a nanny.

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Red-1

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Awww how exciting, it looks like they're hitting it off already! :)

I've so enjoyed following your thread. It's clear that Rigsby needed you as much as you needed him <3 That year has flown by!
It has. We were perfect for each other. He is a little put out that the new one has pinched his stable! But, that stable is the biggest, and the new one is substantially bigger. We have a plan though, a builder is coming in September, supposedly, to build Rigsby a verandah to his stable, so it will have a back door onto a hardstanding area. The same for the new horse. So, they can have privacy in their stables, but independently wander out to scratch necks over a fence outside. It will be good for his old joints to have more space, around 25ft by 12ft outside.
 

Miss_Millie

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It has. We were perfect for each other. He is a little put out that the new one has pinched his stable! But, that stable is the biggest, and the new one is substantially bigger. We have a plan though, a builder is coming in September, supposedly, to build Rigsby a verandah to his stable, so it will have a back door onto a hardstanding area. The same for the new horse. So, they can have privacy in their stables, but independently wander out to scratch necks over a fence outside. It will be good for his old joints to have more space, around 25ft by 12ft outside.
Wowee, what a lucky boy!! Hope you share some photos when the stable renovations are finished :)
 

Red-1

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Rigsby is morphing into a very capable babysitter for a very wobbly baby.

A friend came to ride on the arena with us. She has sat on Rigs once before, way back. He hadn't been ridden for about 2 weeks. Other than a quick sit, she hadn't ridden for at least nine months, probably more. So lovely not to have a worry. He is the same ridden or not. The same with any rider. Happy to sit and wait, happy to walk.

He isn't bothered about the new horse, as long as he has food.

Good old Riggers.

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Red-1

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Congratulations on the new acquisition. Do you need any particular kind of insurance for the nursing home visits?
No, my horse box was insured as voluntary work, I checked. We are social domestic or pleasure, they thought it would be covered on pleasure anyway, but the voluntary work was certain.

The insurance was checked too, as we weren't paid, they were happy to cover 3rd party as it was for my pleasure, not as some business venture.
 

Red-1

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Clever Rigsby. What a good boy he is.
It was my plan when I bought him. Have one to nurse better, no pressure when I was feeling like I couldn't ride. Then a bit of a fun ride to get me back into it. Then escort my new horse, when I got it, then retire.

He does feel old, truth be told. He only has to walk round a bit. He is mannerly and kind and I can allow all levels of riders to ride. I hope, once the new one is up and running, that he has a long and happy retirement.
 

julesjoy

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No, my horse box was insured as voluntary work, I checked. We are social domestic or pleasure, they thought it would be covered on pleasure anyway, but the voluntary work was certain.

The insurance was checked too, as we weren't paid, they were happy to cover 3rd party as it was for my pleasure, not as some business venture.
Thank you. I've been pondering doing similar with my teenies and thought it would be more complex. That gives me hope.
 

Red-1

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Thank you. I've been pondering doing similar with my teenies and thought it would be more complex. That gives me hope.
I have 'done' 3 homes now, using 2 well behaved horses. At each one the managers and staff were dead keen. The residents love it. I stopped because of Covid for a while, but would be open to do more now.

I decided to because a friend in America does it. She too started while her mother was in a home, then continued afterwards. She also has 2 dogs that do visits.
 

Red-1

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Rigsby was naughty! His halo slipped!

I was leading my new, baby, horse through Rigsby's field. I have been doing this twice daily for a week, ridden through it a few times too. Usually Rigsby just carries on eating because, well... Rigsby. Baby horse is sweet and just walks through.

Today, Rigsby came over, turned round and started kicking the innocent new baby.

I made like a screaming banshee woman, especially as I could hear blows landing.

I got them sorted.

I am happy to say that the new, sweet, horse isn't injured.

Rigsby has a little cut from where the new baby defended himself. I don't feel sorry for Rigsby, not one bit. Bad Rigsby.
 

Red-1

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Poor new horse, I'm glad he was ok
I hope you are too, it sounds frightening and horrible

It sounds as if Rigsby was trying to live up to his name
His passport said rig when I bought him, but the bloods say not a rig. He has been dead steady with the newbie up until today. Really ignored him when leading to and fro. He was due to come in and have a hay net. He is a greedy so and so, I think he was hangry. He did used to live in a mixed heard with no issues.
 
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