I think I want my horse back

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13 June 2011
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I have 3 horses, one is retired, one is out on loan and one is my riding horse, except he's been unsound on and off but ok hacking out at a walk, I wanted to compete with him and the area we hack out has some fab tracks for cantering, but not able to, sigh

So I could buy another one to ride, but the logical thing is to ask for my horse back, but she's been out on loan for a few years, the loaner has done a lot with her, much more than I ever did and they get on really well

Haven't done anything, I just go see my horse and if he's ok, I'll hack him out gently and pout a bit, is it fair to ask for my horse back when the loanee has put so much into it

Of course I'm still running the risk that she's going to hand the horse back when it's no longer useful, that's when I have 3 ornamentals, but it's going to happen at some point anyway I guess

What do you guys think? (posting as newbie as I haven't made any decision)
 

Potato!

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Have you thought about asking her i she wants to buy the horse and then you could go horse shopping for something for you. without feeling bad about it.
 
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Yes, I did, when she took the horse on, she said something about commitment, which is why I reckon I might get it back at some point anyway
 

LaurenM

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If you asked when she took your horse on then I'm guessing that was a few years ago? I'd ask if she wanted to buy your horse now and find something new for yourself.

She's attached to your horse so her thoughts on buying may have changed.
 

jeeve

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I would definitley ask for your horse back, she may offer to but it, so think about whether this is what you want to do. Do you want your horse or a new horse? Then if she does offer to buy, know what is reasonable. How much is it going to cost you to replace.

I do not see the point in having money tied up in a loan horse, if you cannot ask for it back whn your circumstances change.

I have loaned out a child' pony, and when I had the room to keep it and a purpose for it, I asked for it back. They were disapointed, I asked them if they were willing to buy, they were not at that time, so back he came.
 

Luci07

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On the basis that ultimately, the financial decision will rest for you, then you have every right to ask for your horse back. I think the earlier suggestion that you ask your loaner if she is willing to buy so you can buy another horse and if not, agree a time when your horse can come back is the best one.

While I know you feel your sharer has put a lot of time into your horse, this is the deal with loan horses! and I sound a little unsympathetic is because I can testify that loan horses do come back when they are completely retired so you have every right to enjoy yours while you can!
 

MrsMozart

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Agree with the others.

If you want the loan horse and he will meet your requirements, then have him back.

If you're ambivalent about the loan horse ask the loaner if she wants to buy him now. If not for financial reasons, then either gift him to her (a £1 nominal price) if you can afford to, or tell her that you're going to have to sell him to someone else. The loan may well end pretty quickly at that point and he'll be back with you whilst you sell. If she doesn't want him for other reasons, then yes, he's probably going to be coming back at some point, so if you don't want him, end the loan and put him up for sale now.

We loaned a horse from someone we trust implicitly, but we are buying the horse so that no matter what, she will be ours and there will never be that feeling of she's not ours. The loaner has been fantastic over the eight months we've had her on loan, never interfering, always fine with everything, so we are thankful for that :D :D. However, as she was on loan, by the sheer nature of it being a loan, we always knew there was the slimmest and outside chance that the owner might want her back. It's the way of it.
 

MiJodsR2BlinkinTite

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I think you and loanee need to have a talk; you need to know what she feels about your horse and by now she should have a good idea of whether its a horse that she might, for e.g. like to make an offer for?

IF she likes your horse and is able to make an offer, then that's your dilemma solved innit, however I do think you need to know what the situation is.

It might just be (no disrespect to you) that this particular rider suits your horse and she's been able to bring out the best in him/her, and the horse wouldn't necessarily go for you in the same way. Sorry to be honest but this often is the way....

Personally I'd sit down with loanee and have a serious chat. She for her part (no disrespect) has got a "free" horse with apparently an open-ended time commitment, and is probably quite anxious that the owner will want the horse back after she's put in so much work, so she'll probably welcome knowing how she stands.

Ummm, you HAVE got a proper written loan agreement in place haven't you .....?????
 

riding_high

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i would speak to the person who has your horse on loan and explain your predicament, ask her if she would be willing to buy your horse so you can safely go and look for another one without the worry of her sending your horse back.

what was the reason to you loaning your horse out in the first place? if it was because you weren't 'connecting' with it then maybe you are hoping you will now and be able to get out and do things that your loaner is doing, kind of like a jealousy thing (meant in the nicest way!). IF that is the case then what will you do if you get your horse back and things don't change?
 

Teddybully

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While I know you feel your sharer has put a lot of time into your horse, this is the deal with loan horses!
Absolutely. I'm sick of hearing how people say they've 'put all the hard work in and now owner wants it back' - so buy it - 'can't afford it'. Ok, but you were happy to have a free horse for however long and now want to moan about it.

Rant over.

See if she wants to buy, if not, agree a time for the horse to come back. You didn't 'give' her the horse, she 'borrowed' it and now you want it back. Simple as that.
 

Wheels

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Agree with the others. This is your horse and you are now in a position where loaning him out is not in your best interests. Maybe he isn't the right horse for you in which case you should sell him. You could give the loaner first option to buy and even give her a reduced rate if it makes you feel better, then you could buy yourself a different horse. If you think the loaned out horse is suitable for you then give the loaner a couple of months notice and then take him back.
I currently have a horse on loan and while I love him and would be upset if he went, I am under no illusion that the owner will want him back at some point just as she realises that if my circumstances change I may need to send him back. That's the good and bad of loaning i'm afraid. Good luck
 

Mithras

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Absolutely. I'm sick of hearing how people say they've 'put all the hard work in and now owner wants it back' - so buy it - 'can't afford it'. Ok, but you were happy to have a free horse for however long and now want to moan about it.

Rant over.

See if she wants to buy, if not, agree a time for the horse to come back. You didn't 'give' her the horse, she 'borrowed' it and now you want it back. Simple as that.
Agree with this. You haven't given the horse away, you have loaned it. Whats the point in you buying another horse so that you have only one out of four horses that you can actually ride, to avoid inconveniencing the loaner? Its your horse, you are entitled to it back. Don't feel guilty - the loaner has saved probably thousands of pounds in purchase price and no-one made her loan instead of buying her own horse.

I bet she wouldn't have any problem about returning your horse if it went long term lame or got older and had to be retired!

Does she live nearby though? Could you retain her as a sharer when the horse comes back to you?
 
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the loaner has done a lot with her, much more than I ever did and they get on really well
Horses don't care about winning competitions or improving their canter transitions. She will be fine as a happy hack or competing at a lower level. :)
 

LegOn

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Yeah have to agree - its your horse, you should be able to ask for him back!

If they loanee wants to buy him now & you want to sell him - then fine but otherwise, its perfectly acceptable to end the loan if you have a use for him again, thats the whole of idea of loans really, isnt it??!
 

YasandCrystal

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If you asked when she took your horse on then I'm guessing that was a few years ago? I'd ask if she wanted to buy your horse now and find something new for yourself.

She's attached to your horse so her thoughts on buying may have changed.
Ditto this. Personally I would find it difficult to just ask for the horse back, if loaner has been good for the horse and bonded, but to give the option of purchase would seem the ideal solution.
 

Magicmillbrook

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I think you and loanee need to have a talk; you need to know what she feels about your horse and by now she should have a good idea of whether its a horse that she might, for e.g. like to make an offer for?

IF she likes your horse and is able to make an offer, then that's your dilemma solved innit, however I do think you need to know what the situation is.

It might just be (no disrespect to you) that this particular rider suits your horse and she's been able to bring out the best in him/her, and the horse wouldn't necessarily go for you in the same way. Sorry to be honest but this often is the way....

Personally I'd sit down with loanee and have a serious chat. She for her part (no disrespect) has got a "free" horse with apparently an open-ended time commitment, and is probably quite anxious that the owner will want the horse back after she's put in so much work, so she'll probably welcome knowing how she stands.

Ummm, you HAVE got a proper written loan agreement in place haven't you .....?????
Agree with this totaly
 

TicTac

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A loan is a loan and depending on what your agreement states, then you are perfectly within reason to ask for your horse back.

I would also agree with what others have said and obviously talk to the person who has your horse and offer first refusal to buy etc and then take it from there.
 

SusieT

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Offer the loaner first refusal to buy the horse, if she doesn't want to buy (it may take her a few months to find money possibly?) I would say you need to terminate the agreement, bearing in mind you loaned this horse for a reason, do you definitely want it back?
 

canteron

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OP just have an honest talk with the loanee and see what she really wants!!

You have every right to want the horse back, but if you do it in liaison with the loanee it will be heaps better for you and the horse!! It may be that you have it back, but she continues to ride it until she finds a replacement and makes a contribution, or helps out occassionally. Or you ride and she competes it and looks after it when you go on hols. Or if you decide is not the horse for you, she helps you find a new permanent homes.

Who knows until you talk!!
 
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Thanks guys, I know what I need to do, that's pretty unanimous!

I do have a proper written agreement covering notice, tack, insurance, vets, blah, I loaned the horse out as I had 3 and when my circumstances changed, one horse went to an equestrian college, is now retired, I kept the silly youngster who was going through a horrible phase, he's now the ornamental horse for life, I loaned out the one that was easiest to loan.

If I sold her I'd sell her to the loanee, for the price she was worth at the start of the loan, I wouldn't get anything like her for the money.

So, not looking forward to the conversation but very much to riding out again!
 
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Will lay off having that conversation for a while, just seen a facebook post about amazing schooling session with wonderhorse

sigh
 

Honey08

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Don't put it off. Just be totally honest. Say exactly what you told us - that you think that the horse goes better for her than you, you have been really happy with them having your horse, and you'd be happy to sell the horse to her if she liked and buy something else, but that if not circumstances have changed, you can't ride any of the horses that you've got, so you need your remaining riding horse back, or else the money to buy another riding horse.

From experience I can add that your horse may be adored for years and years in a loan home, but will probably come back to you as an oldie - mine was out on loan for 10 yrs, but came back to me to die, so to speak.
 

Ibblebibble

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if you keep putting it off because loanee posts something nice on FB you'll never get your horse back!! it's your horse, you want to ride it, you need to tell them:)
 

LiveryList

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If you have a termination clause in your loan agreement then you can ask for the horse back at any given time. He is still your horse at the end of the day so you are well within your right to ask for him back. I agree the purchase option may be something to look at as an alternative option :)
 
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I agree, call her tonight. Also, if you don't want to buy a different horse (because you love that one), then don't offer her the option of buying the mare. If you don't mind if you have that particular horse back (you just want a sound one to ride) then give the loaner the option to buy. :)
 

Teddybully

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I do have a proper written agreement covering notice, tack, insurance, vets, blah,
How long was your agreement for? Did you discuss how long you were thinking of loaning for?

Don't put off tackling this. It might be awkward but you'll be relieved once it's all sorted. It's probably on your mind all the time at the moment!
 

Luci07

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my mare came home after 5 years so do they do come back! you loaned because you didn't want to sell so don't feel bad about it. Its not as if you intend to turn up and take the horse away with no notice or conversation. I too would not relish having to say it, but if all else fails you, try sitting in front of your bank balance/expenses spreadsheet. I always find that having that in front of me tends to ensure my mind is swiftly focused!
 
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