Jumping in draw reins...... always thought this was a bad idea!

Bay_Beasty

Well-Known Member
Joined
29 September 2008
Messages
3,463
Location
Berkshire
Hey,

Just asking for your opinions really. I watched a video on you tube recently of a girl (show jumper) jumping one of her horses in draw reins. She was doing grid work, ending over a big fence about 1.30/1.35. but she is jumping her horse in draw reins. I always thought this was a bad idea, as horse is not given his head etc and if you loose a rein if the horse takes a long stride or something, you could get the rein under the leg, and I was taught from PC at a very young age, never jump in draw reins. I would love to put the video up but I wont. If you want to see it PM me and I will send you the link.


Any way what are your thoughts? Am I just being stupid and is jumping in draw reins ok now!
:confused:
 

Sirreal

Well-Known Member
Joined
3 May 2010
Messages
234
Location
Shropshire
Just seen the video in question. No, I would never jump in draw reins. I probably will never use them either :D but, as draw reins were not even designed to be used in that way anyway, I think it would be downright dangerous, especially at that height. :cool:
 

ihatework

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 September 2004
Messages
19,475
The vast majority of pro showjumpers will ride some horses in draw reins over a fence.
I personally don't agree with it and it is not something I'd ever do, but on the sj circuit it is far more common than you would ever imagine.
 

competitiondiva

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 September 2008
Messages
3,832
Agree with above, I personally do not recommend or like it, but I have worked at a pro-showjumping yard and they did ride one horse in them over jumps.
 

Sol

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 May 2009
Messages
4,133
Location
Shropshire, England.
A child was jumping a pony at unaffiliated jumping at the yard just a few days back. I was shocked! Child's position alone certainly wasn't up to scratch for being given that type of aid (insecure lower leg, appeared very dependant on hands, not using legs enough) - scary stuff. I'm fairly sure it was the same child that brought her pony into a very wide spread in the warm up, at a very bad angle, with about 2 trot strides (still on an angle but straight strides) to it! My heart was honestly in my mouth, how the pony made the back bar without disaster, i don't know, but credit definitely went to pony and not rider! :mad:
 

bigboyrocky

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 April 2008
Messages
2,448
Would never jump in draw reins - and would never use them on my own horses! a. because i dont like them b. they dont need them c. ive never been taught to use them, so wouldnt want to without someone knowlegable there!

Although I have used them on a few DR horses i was riding for someone under thier instruction.
 
Joined
22 August 2010
Messages
12
Location
Hampshire
i dont agree with them for jumping, have seen the video and dont think she should be taking him through the bigger height at the end with them, think they can be quite dangerous if you get a really crappy stride or a little stumble or whatever, because thats when the horse relies on his head and neck to balance and sort himself out. also seems he's resisting a little on his normal shape because maybe he doesnt want to touch/pull the reins?
its her horse and her decision, like we dont know why she chose to use them...
just my opinion and again have used them a couple of times on the flat but only because of advice from someone that knows what theyre talking about and was watching the whole time checking they were doing the right job :)
 

RSL

Well-Known Member
Joined
2 September 2009
Messages
563
I knew someone who done this, ended up almost losing their horse.

I would never do it, I always like to have a real loose rein when jumping.
 

Crackajack

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 June 2010
Messages
568
I've used draw reins many a time...but only on the flat!!!

I have done trotting poles/canter poles with them on but never jumped...for those reasons described!!

Anytime i do use draw reins i do ensure somebody is watching me because it is far too easy to use them as a method of getting your horse to look pretty - which will do damage rather than help!
 

schneeko

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 May 2010
Messages
389
Location
Southampton, Hampshire
I really HATE people who jump in draw reins, and tbh I don't like them in general. This is one thing I feel really strongly about. My horse used to be jumped in them (by his old owner) and he became so nervous about jumping that I almost gave up on it completely. You had to really hold him as he was used to the draw reins doing it and then he'd take off afterwards thinking that it was going to hurt his mouth.

He also moved his head about a lot where they "sawwed" on his mouth with draw reins. He's a lot better now but I really don't think draw reins should be used for jumping and only on the flat by really experienced people and only if there really is a need for them.
 
Last edited:

Eriskayowner

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 May 2008
Messages
1,980
Location
Wellington, Somerset, England
seen so many people at shows with them
jumping newcomer tracks with them :eek:
iv never used them dont plan to either
and OP i saw that video too x
Is that BS legal?

"A Market Harborough rein may be used, but only with a plain snaffle, not a gag. All other running or check reins and reins acting through sheaves or pulleys are prohibited in the arena."
 

Sparkles

Well-Known Member
Joined
4 April 2009
Messages
7,572
Have done schooling with SJ'ers, but always with them attatched to the martingale/breastplate from the top of their chest.
 

ThoroughbredStar

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 August 2010
Messages
867
Absolutely not! Would not even school a horse in draw reins let alone sj! It is very damaging to their bodies and in the wrong hands very very dangerous. It amazes me that professional/top level riders use these gadgets.....so much for natural ability or patience maybe?? Just my opinion but no :)
 

nofie

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 December 2009
Messages
193
What about them? Market Harboroughs release the pressure (so the horse can stretch his neck) when the rider gives with the hands. Better than draw reins which get loose and loopy when the hands are given.
I mean in terms of jumping. I agree, better than draw reins, but of course only in the right hands.

I guess I am a bit of a minimalist and prefer to see simple tack, but then each horse / rider is different.
 

stilltrying

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 September 2009
Messages
665
Location
Kent
I was actually recommended to jump in draw reins a while back with my lad. It was suggested for some XC schooling. He is a big onward bound sort who, whilst isn't strong as such, can take charge and just runs through your hands and then hollows out. I believe they were going to be attached to a breastplate rather than a the girth. I never did use them though.
 

Seahorse

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 May 2003
Messages
8,290
Location
East Sussex
What about them? Market Harboroughs release the pressure (so the horse can stretch his neck) when the rider gives with the hands. Better than draw reins which get loose and loopy when the hands are given.
I used to jump my horse in a Market Harborough but even though it was loose he always felt he was cat leaping them and not jumping in a nice shape. When I took it off he was much better.
I used to hunt a horse in a MH he was fab with it on but if you dared ride him without it he was really strong!
 

KatB

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 August 2005
Messages
23,283
Location
Nottingham
BSJAShowjumper123, you wouldn't have seen them used around a NC track. In the warm up maybe, but definitely not in the ring.

Each to their own. I personally wouldn't use them to jump big fences in, although I have used them over smaller fences (under 3ft), with them going under a neckstrap to eliminate the risk of catching a leg in them. I had a very specific reason for using them though, which was more to do with the approach. I would never recommend them though, as every case differs enormously.

I hate market harboroughs with a passion, as they never really release, and give a false outline and can assist horses in leaning.

As I say, each to their own ;)
 

nofie

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 December 2009
Messages
193
Ditto!! It's taken me 2 years to turn Jazzy into a rideable horse instead of a camel!
Well done that's fab, it definately pays off in the long run, rather than just stapping a horse up as a quick fix!

Ps I see your lab crosses it's front legs too, my lab x greyhound does- she looks so elegant! :)
 
Top