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Kissing Spines

Twiglet

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 September 2004
Messages
8,369
Location
Clapham
I may have a chance to take on the ride of a horse with kissing spines. The vets have given him the ok to be ridden and brought on - he will have remedial back treatment etc.

I just wondered what the long term prognosis can be for this condition? This is quite a young horse, and I was wondering about the chances of its schooling progressing.

Obviously I'll be getting more details on this horse's case, I was just wondering whilst at work!

Any experiences will be appreciated.
 

wombat

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 November 2006
Messages
258
we have a horse at my yard with kissing spines and he is still working.. but we have to massage his back, warm it up b4 we work him.. can't jump any more.. but still able to hack and do light schooling
 

wombat

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 November 2006
Messages
258
we have a horse at my yard with kissing spines and he is still working.. but we have to massage his back, warm it up b4 we work him.. can't jump any more.. but still able to hack and do light schooling.. he also has to live out now
 

squirtlysmum

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Joined
23 November 2006
Messages
829
Location
Canterbury
As already posted just proceed with caution as sometimes they can be very explosive. However in a survey of post mortem race horses, not euthanised for back problems, 80% were found to have some degree of kissing spine (spinous process impingment) so I belive a lot of horses have it and just get on with life!
 

BethH

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Joined
17 January 2006
Messages
1,123
Location
Kent
Is this horse having surgery or palliative treatment - if you want info please pm my my youngster went through the operation earlier this year and is now back in work.

If palliative, depends on the severity of back problem as to whether this route will work. I did have behavioural problems with mine caused by the spine but he is very sensitive, yours may not be bothered but I would find out history of any behavioural problems before you get too involved so you can make a qualified decision. A hat and body protector is a must, as if in pain they can be unpredictable, be very careful asking the horse to go down short sharp hills and expect him to be quite spooky as if in pain will be on alert most of the time - you must be a confident but sympathetic quiet rider (in my experience of this!). Check whether they have had any rearing or broncing problems with the horse. This is me being very safety conscious as your horse may not have displayed any of these symptoms, do be aware though, as they can occur as the back deteriorates or if the horse grows

Saying that, working properly to strengthen the back muscles will help enormously, long reining is absolutely great for this when done properly and it can be very rewarding, just be careful if the horse has issues that you don't allow it to affect your confidence - a common problem amongst owners whose horses have had kissing spine problems!

Hope that helps you.
 

Twiglet

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 September 2004
Messages
8,369
Location
Clapham
As far as I'm aware, it's pretty minor, so I would imagine not many spines kissing as it were.
He has a fab topline, and seems to have come back into work after the initial diagnosis and treatment very well, he hasn't needed surgery.

His owner wants to start a family and is hoping that I'll start riding the horse as a favour once she is unable to, so it definitely won't be a purchase or anything. I'd only want to hack and do Novice/Elementary dressage on it at the most (don't have time to do much more work with my own horse + job + house renovation!).

He's a DWB, stunning build and conformation and paces, but a bit green.

Thanks for all your replies guys, I'll make sure I bear it all in mind if it goes ahead so I can quiz her and the vet for more info.
 

seabiscuit

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 July 2005
Messages
6,229
A good top line says it all- horses with Severe kissing spines are just unable to build up the correct top line as they are just physically unable to use themselves in the right way hence very little muscle build up.....
If he has an excellent top line then that is great news shows that there is very limited active impingment, thus it will not be bothering him too much..
Keep a careful eye on that topline and condition, the moment you notice his muscles starting to drop away thats when you know that things are becoming a problem....
 
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