Lame horse

HorsesRule2009

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8 September 2009
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594
Hello,

Just a quick question, we've got a lame horse where I'm working, was initially a foot abcess, to the point where he was on 3 legs! (I've never seen a horse so lame in 20yrs+ of being around them)

He's gradually got better (about 10 weeks since first lame)
But is still clearly lame in walk 2tenths and worse in trot.

Am I wrong to say I don't feel happy riding him until he is sounder?

He lives out so shouldn't be stiff, has been being led from another horse for a week plus and still no real improvement?

Cheers.

Ps please don't tell me to get vet/farrier if I was in charge I would. Boss doesn't want to
 

ycbm

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I would say that the horse should not be being ridden unless a vet has said it is part of the recovery process.

I would also say that the law is being broken if a vet has not been called to check why the horse is still lame after all this time.


.
 

be positive

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A lame horse should not not be ridden, with very few exceptions under veterinary advice, I would suspect there is some damage inside the foot which may heal in time but equally may be more serious and require veterinary care, which any responsible owner would be doing by now.
 

Lillian_paddington

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It’s completely reasonable for you not to want to ride the horse - does your boss know the horse is still lame or is it possible they think it’s recovered? Ten weeks is a long time for a foot abscess to still be causing problems. I think some severe abscesses can cause damage to the structures deeper in the foot which might explain why it is still lame
 

Melody Grey

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Horse welfare issues would obviously be a major concern with riding a horse known to be lame (unless part of rehab prescribed by vet), but that aside, consider your own safety!! I wouldn't want to get on anything known to be lame for fear of it falling over....and if this is your job, I feel it's unreasonable for an employer to expect you to.
 

HorsesRule2009

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Thank you all you have reassured me I'm not going made!

Boss keeps insisting it's muscular, I'm not convinced there's not still something going on in the foot.
But even if muscular I think we'd be making more problems riding as its a hind leg/hoof so think we'd make the back sore?

Again thank you
 

Melody Grey

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Thank you all you have reassured me I'm not going made!

Boss keeps insisting it's muscular, I'm not convinced there's not still something going on in the foot.
But even if muscular I think we'd be making more problems riding as its a hind leg/hoof so think we'd make the back sore?

Again thank you
Ten weeks is a long time for something muscular in my experience unless it's muscular tension caused elsewhere as a result of the original lameness? Is a Physio part of this rehab? Or a vet for that matter?
 

HorsesRule2009

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594
Ten weeks is a long time for something muscular in my experience unless it's muscular tension caused elsewhere as a result of the original lameness? Is a Physio part of this rehab? Or a vet for that matter?
Thinking is originally an abcess now muscular.

No no vet or physio,
 

twiggy2

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3 July 2013
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Seriously, lame for ten weeks and no vet?
A lame horse should not be worked with or without a rider unless on those rare occasions a vet advises it.
I would not continue working somewhere lame horses were being worked.
 
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