Laminitis?

mcnaughty

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28 August 2009
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I have a nearly 5yo highland gelding who is not over weight. Last June his old owner sent him to he broken professionally and they put fronts on him as he was footy on stony ground. Old owner was paranoid about keeping him v slim to the extent that prof said she was a bit OTT with strict instructions during this time on his management. She had only had him 3 months so don’t think this strictness was due to knowledge but rather paranoia. Breaking went well but old owner lost her nerve and sold him to us in early November. I had his shoes taken off as he was turned away for winter. He was footy all winter, avoided walking on stony ground himself by walking up the bank! Had a nasty haematoma in a hind in early feb. Healed well. Had farrier out today to put fronts back on and he has bruising to both front toes and he mentioned laminitis but also said he has thin soles. I’ll say again he is not fat. He lives out 24/7 with a Welsh b and a Shetland on around 3 acre field of mixed well grazed grass and meadow flowers. It’s not rich grazing. He has been brought back into light work twice a week. Your thoughts please.
 

meleeka

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Did the farrier say he thought he’d had laminitis? It sounds unlikely to me. My guess is it’s the quality of his sole that’s causing him to be uncomfortable. If he’s not on Biotin that could help.
 

HeyMich

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I have a 12.2 welshy who has very sensitive hind feet. He isn't shod, isn't overweight, and has very healthy looking hooves. No signs of lami - the farrier just says he's got thin soles and is a wimp! I boot him for any work over stony ground (Easyboot Epics - great wee boots!), and make sure he gets a good mineral balancer. It seems to work!
 

IrishMilo

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Horses don't need to be fat to get laminitis, FWIW. But in your case it sounds like he's uncomfortable from thin soles.
 

Nari

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Maybe, like his previous owner, I'm paranoid about laminitis in good doer natives that have evolved to live on very little. If he was mine I'd be seeing what difference further restricting his access to grass and increasing his work made because if he's got EMS or ID then that will help. I'd want him on the light side - can you easily feel ribs, is there any crest? Unless your grazing is very poor I'd say 3 on 3 acres is probably too much grass - I'd rather have them on less and if needs be supplement them with properly soaked hay. Thin soles can be an indicator of metabolic problems so please don't shrug it off as just being that, indeed my paranoia level nowdays would have me wanting x-rays to see how thin they are and if there are internal problems.
 

PurBee

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Grass and hay only diets dont provide all the minerals and vitamins a horse needs, unlike in their wild counterparts who have access to trees, bushes, roots, clay and other forage, aside from grasses.
A mineral balancer will help fill-in any shortfall the grazing/hay does not supply and you should see hoof horn/sole quality improve.
 

JFTDWS

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4 November 2010
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If mine were unworked and living on 3 acres of field without any modification, they'd most definitely be fat. A lot of highland people would think otherwise though...

TBH if he's uncomfortable, I'd treat as if he is pre-laminitic at this time of year - by which I mean dramatically restricting grazing, replacing with hay and making sure he has adequate Mg etc in his diet.
 
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