laminitus

ldlp111

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am i right in thinking there is less sugar in the grass at night and thats why laminitics get put out at night and in during day.??
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Sparkles

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yep as the sugars go to nearer the roots as there's less light
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where as in the day the sugars come to the top.

or something like that...only really works if you can be there at the crack of dawn bringing them in and turning out just before dusk lol.
 

f_s_

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Yes, less sugar but not "no sugar". Grass needs light to grow so through night time hours (as there is no light - sorry a bit obvious there!) it doesn't grow so much.

Sugar, all forms of sugar, play a large part in the cause of laminitis, but it is not the only cause of laminitis.
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f_s_

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Have they ever had laminitis before? Is the new strip long grass or short grass?
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ldlp111

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well there is some grass but more buttercups!! bloody things.
yes one of them had it a few years ago hence why im strip grazing it.
 

f_s_

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If the grass is a bit longer and there's not too much, you should be OK, but please err on the side of caution.
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If it's really short and starting to flush then I would say no.
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ldlp111

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i dont give them fresh every night as they only eat the good stuff lil piggys. i am right that buttercups are an irritant?
 

Nailed

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Oh and horses tend too eat less over night too...

And its Laminitis.. ITIS.. because its the swelling of the laminae.

(SORRY PET HATE)

Lou x
 

f_s_

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AgggggHHHH!!!! Clover!! full of nitrate I believe!

Could have been a contributing factor
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Do you have any old pasture? Having said that laminitis respects no type of pasture unfortunately!
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We have old pasture, never fertilise, check for weeds, docks, strip graze, have starvation paddocks etc, etc but unfortunately, one of mine went down with it, two years ago.

I have heard recently that gut imbalance can have an effect, so I fed a bit of brewer's yeast and apart from helping with the flies, it can balance the gut a bit. Don't know if that helps, but, if I can help another then I'll try
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MrsMozart

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Ooops on the clover front then
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. Hm. Don't think he'll be going back out there! Ah well.

Brewers yeast. Do I get that from the health food shop? Can I feed the other numpties on it as well (thinking flies!).
 

f_s_

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Yes I bought mine from the local health food shop, the guy was kind enough to order it in for me. It came in powder form and I had a 5kgs bag. Think it cost about £16 and lasted for ages and ages, as you only need a heaped teaspoon every day
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You can feed it to the others too. I think it improved their coats and feet too, so maybe an added advantage as well as a fly repellent!

Oh so sorry, forgot to say, you could add a tiny bit of epsom salts to the feed for your LL, don't know how big he is but you don't need much. I do give mine a bit when the grass is flushing, just be carefull they don't start to scouer on it.

Reminds me I 'm running low so I'll have to buy some more too!!
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Azabache

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I would agree about gut imbalance. My old pony had cushings so was v prone to laminitis throughout the year. He almost always showed mild colic symptoms before going down with laminitis the next day. I have a luso now, who as a breed are prone to it although thank goodness so far with careful management I've managed to avoid it. I noticed tonight though that he was rather bloated and a bit tummyish and sure enough his feet were a little warm and coronet band was slightly spongey. As someone posted last night, this rain, sun, rain is perfect colic / laminitis triggering weather!
 

Honeypots

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Please note that horses/ponies that have been deprived of good grass during the day will probably eat as much as they can once on good grass even if it is during the night. Its not just about how much sugar there is in the grass. Grass can still trigger laminitis even at night. You need to take the same precautions at night as you do in the day..
 
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