Lessons

piglet2001

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21 March 2014
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Hi, just wondering how much you all pay for a good quality instructor (but not a big name) per hour, not including facilities hire.
Thanks in advance
 

Roxylola

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One who trains with Carl, lots of experience training young horses etc, competed to advanced I think, is £40 for about 45 mins (shes generous with time but I've been known to stop before 45 mins as we've gone well) if we go to her.
Another I've not been to for a while but again trains with Carl but is currently and has previously competed at GP is (or was) i think £65 for 45 mins.
Jumping I've paid £40 I think for a good local instructor if we go to her - again I don't clock watch we've done a super 40 minute session and stopped, we've also done about an hour when we needed to really nail something
 

Griffin

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I pay £25 for 30 minutes or £30 for £45 minutes with a good instructor. They are not a coach as such but they are very accomplished in their discipline and an excellent natural teacher.
 

iknowmyvalue

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Currently paying £25 for 30 mins for jumping, and £35 for 30 mins for dressage. Both individual lessons.

previous yard was (I think) £30 for an hour lesson with YO (I would have paid more). Can’t remember exactly because just used to go on the livery bill and sometimes I got them for less when I was working there.
 

teapot

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But when you factor the horse costs in.......
hhahahahahaha yeah.... that does even up the balance somewhat.

I pay £70 and I went there. I am now based next door so it's not a special journey any more.
Depends where you are and what your costings are. Friends of mine spend far less a month on their horses, than what I do on lessons alone.

You guys do realise that some riding school clients are spending close to three figures a lesson these days? I know of kids group lessons that are over £50...
 

milliepops

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Depends where you are and what your costings are. Friends of mine spend far less a month on their horses/lessons, than what I do on lessons alone...

You guys do realise that some riding school clients are spending close to three figures a lesson these days?
blimey, it was a lighthearted comment, I'm sorry that riding lessons are so expensive but as you can see mine aren't exactly cheap either, in the past it cost me £30 in fuel plus the maintenance of a lorry to get there so easily 3 figs per 45 mins, (now i livery on site so still haev additional outgoings) plus the upkeep of the horse... it's not a competition is it?
 

teapot

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blimey, it was a lighthearted comment, I'm sorry that riding lessons are so expensive but as you can see mine aren't exactly cheap either, in the past it cost me £30 in fuel plus the maintenance of a lorry to get there so easily 3 figs per 45 mins, (now i livery on site so still haev additional outgoings) plus the upkeep of the horse... it's not a competition is it?
No it isn't at all :) Just pointing out that costs as owners actually work out a lot better sometimes!

I'm happy to pay what I do anyway, but others aren't and as costs increase, we could have a rapidly shrinking industry, which will include losing competition venues.
 

JulesRules

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No it isn't at all :) Just pointing out that costs as owners actually work out a lot better sometimes!
Sorry but I agree with @milliepops on this one. At a riding school your only cost is the lesson. With your own horse you have to factor instructor, travel, livery, transport, hay & feed, insurance, worming, farrier, tack, rugs, saddle fitter, dentist, body worker and more. You'd need to be having a lot of lessons to make it cheaper to have lessons on your own horse.

Of course that isn't why we do it....
 

teapot

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Sorry but I agree with @milliepops on this one. At a riding school your only cost is the lesson. With your own horse you have to factor instructor, travel, livery, transport, hay & feed, insurance, worming, farrier, tack, rugs, saddle fitter, dentist, body worker and more. You'd need to be having a lot of lessons to make it cheaper to have lessons on your own horse.

Of course that isn't why we do it....
Yes I know - I work in the industry and am very aware of costs, especially at the moment ;) As I say, I have friends who spend less than I do and regularly remind me I'd be better off with my own! Maybe they're savvy, scrimping or just tight. Who knows. Just offering the other side of the fence :) Prices on this thread make me wonder if some coaches ever make any money...
 
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FlyingCircus

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£15 for 30 minutes (sometimes longer, sometimes shorter) with a wonderful instructor. I'm very lucky!

Was previously spending £40 twice a week with someone who was technically good but didn't understand ponies!
 

WelshD

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I pay £30 for as long as it takes. Sometimes the instructor will leave things at 25 mins and sometimes it can take an hour and a half of stopping and correcting things slowly etc
always value for money though!
 

Gingerwitch

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No it isn't at all :) Just pointing out that costs as owners actually work out a lot better sometimes!

I'm happy to pay what I do anyway, but others aren't and as costs increase, we could have a rapidly shrinking industry, which will include losing competition venues.
And do you really think all the freelance money goes through the books ? You would be on a pretty tidy wage to take home 40 to 60 an hour
 

teapot

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And do you really think all the freelance money goes through the books ? You would be on a pretty tidy wage to take home 40 to 60 an hour
No I don't at all, esp not with their various outgoings. Just baffles me when people say they're only paying £30. Though do appreciate for some it's a second/add on income/pocket money.

I do know coaches on £25k for 3 days a week though. I also highly doubt any self employed coach is working a solid 8hrs a day five/six days a week either for many many reasons. Anyway, state of finances and business in the equestrian industry is a PhD level topic I feel :D
 
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Gingerwitch

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No I don't at all, esp not with their various outgoings. Just baffles me when people say they're only paying £30. Though do appreciate for some it's a second/add on income/pocket money.

I know coaches on £25k for 3 days a week. I also highly doubt any self employed coach is working a solid 8hrs a day five/six days a week either for many many reasons.
But they know the wage and its there choice to work in this industry so not sure how that is an arguement that we horse owners should pay more?
 

teapot

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But they know the wage and its there choice to work in this industry so not sure how that is an arguement that we horse owners should pay more?
It's putting a better price on the value of decent tuition/knowledge/expertise. Why do people undersell it compared to other sports and industries? Why do we also allow unqualifed uninsured people to teach too?
 

MuddyMonster

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I have two.

One is £70 per hour. The other is £40. Both are great but teaching isn't their main source of income.

I think the thing about being a RS rider is that to some extent, you can control the costs overall more than owning outright. Yes, good quality instruction isn't cheap for a RS rider but it isn't cheap for the horse owner either.

Riding at a riding school isn't the same as owning with a totally different set of pro's and con's - so a bit like comparing the price of apples with pears.

I'd be quids in at the moment riding even two or three times a week at a nearby very esteemed RS (if they were open) - but it wouldn't be the same experience. Which is what I have to tell myself as my horse merrily destroys any semblance of a budget due to various factors and I've not actually sat on him since January :D
 
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