Looking to buy a horse need some advice

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Good morning everyone.

Me and my wife are currently looking for are first horse and found a 9month foal my wife loves from a dealer in Doncaster.
Said on preloved it has passport but when we've contacted him he said it needs to see a vet to sort it out. What I wanted to know if we buy the foal can we apply for a passport when we get him are should I try and push the dealer to sort passport out as I don't fancy a fine for not having one. But the price of the foal is really cheap and I know it will need all vaccines etc which isn't a issue if I can apply for passport and have budgeted for all the additional vet bills to start vacs from fresh and worming etc.


Thanks lee greenwood
 

ycbm

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It's illegal to sell him without one. If you buy him without one you'll be fine if you get it done straight away.

But why on earth are you buying a yearling as a first horse?

I'm hoping you have a suitable place to keep it with very experienced people around?


.
 

be positive

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The first question has to be why are you buying a yearling as your first horse, aside from the lack of passport, which should be done before it moves, it will be really cheap for a reason, lack of care in it's first months of life being just one, if you really want to buy a youngster and have the appropriate facilities to keep one then buy from a responsible breeder where you can find out about it's history, have a good idea of what you will end up with, much as everyone does when buying a puppy, or should do, rather than take what may be a very expensive gamble buying from a dealer who has not even bothered to get a passport, what other corners have been cut that may have more serious health implications.

I would suggest you wait until restrictions are lifted and do a bit more research on what you can buy as a more suitable first horse, something that you can ride, assuming you do want to ride, now would be a far better option, it may cost more initially but a yearling will not be a cheap option once everything is factored in.
 
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We have a very good stable that will help with everything backing etc and has vets physio on site and my wife knows the basics and has ridden horse a few years back but we have never bought a horse. I'm just trying to find out if it's been registered and lost are it needs registering if it needs regestring we're going to see if the stables were using can get their vet to sort it out.. If he is passported is it easy to get replaced and name changed. Theirs alot of different answers if I Google it.
 
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The first question has to be why are you buying a yearling as your first horse, aside from the lack of passport, which should be done before it moves, it will be really cheap for a reason, lack of care in it's first months of life being just one, if you really want to buy a youngster and have the appropriate facilities to keep one then buy from a responsible breeder where you can find out about it's history, have a good idea of what you will end up with, much as everyone does when buying a puppy, or should do, rather than take what may be a very expensive gamble buying from a dealer who has not even bothered to get a passport, what other corners have been cut that may have more serious health implications.

I would suggest you wait until restrictions are lifted and do a bit more research on what you can buy as a more suitable first horse, something that you can ride, assuming you do want to ride, now would be a far better option, it may cost more initially but a yearling will not be a cheap option once everything is factored in.
The horse isn't for me I'm just keeping the wife happy if I'm honest. It's for my kids to ride. Their are just starting lessons and I want them to learn the looking after and cleaning out and grooming and to be honest if you saw the poor foal we feel sorry for it and would love to give it a good home. The stables we have is staffed 24/7 with plenty of paddocks a horse walker and horse wash and their teaching my kids how to ride and help with grooming etc and helping us with what food and equipment to get. I know we can't ride him till about 4 but gives my kids and us time to learn everything. We're not going in blind we've got everything lined up ready vet checks worming farrier etc it's just passport I'm not sure on
 
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We have just managed to get hold of the dealer and its no passported so on theory we should be able to register him as long as its done ASAP I'm just calling the stable we're using to see if their vets can do it ASAP so we don't get fined
 

be positive

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If it has a passport it will have a microchip so it is easy enough to find out.

I hope the stables have appropriate turn out for a yearling, so many yards just do not offer enough turn out for youngsters at any time of year, I get the feeling sorry for something but you are really taking a big gamble in so many ways.

Just seen it definitely does not have one, it is easy enough to do as long as you can find a transporter willing to travel it without one.
 

Bellaboo18

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Please don't support a dealer because you feel sorry for a horse he's selling. You're just keeping him in business so there'll be other horses to feel sorry for but you can't buy them all.

Sadly I don't think you're going to listen but you're not a suitable home for a yearling.

Your kids are having lessons, what if they're not interested in 4 years?

Most importantly will the yard offer 24/7 turnout with other youngsters?
 
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If it has a passport it will have a microchip so it is easy enough to find out.

I hope the stables have appropriate turn out for a yearling, so many yards just do not offer enough turn out for youngsters at any time of year, I get the feeling sorry for something but you are really taking a big gamble in so many ways.

Just seen it definitely does not have one, it is easy enough to do as long as you can find a transporter willing to travel it without one.

Thanks for the brilliant reply and advice. The dealer is transporting it up to us when we say we want. The stables has a paddock just for him and also a horse walker and we can walk up on the moors by lead rope and a large stable. What do we need to do for passport is it paperwork first and if we can get a vet to do non essential work

Thanks lee
 

Bellaboo18

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Thanks for the brilliant reply and advice. The dealer is transporting it up to us when we say we want. The stables has a paddock just for him and also a horse walker and we can walk up on the moors by lead rope and a large stable. What do we need to do for passport is it paperwork first and if we can get a vet to do non essential work

Thanks lee
Ahh no. He can't be turned out on his own especially at his age.
 
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Please don't support a dealer because you feel sorry for a horse he's selling. You're just keeping him in business so there'll be other horses to feel sorry for but you can't buy them all.

Sadly I don't think you're going to listen but you're not a suitable home for a yearling.

Your kids are having lessons, what if they're not interested in 4 years?

Most importantly will the yard offer 24/7 turnout with other youngsters?
The owner is going to turn it out with her youngsters. We jus need to have him gelded in October. The dealer is quite well known even are stable owner knows of him from the cob showing. His name is Harry stoyles. Has good reviews on Facebook alot of people have bought horses from him and are happy. It's a risk buying any horse from a dealer are a individual.
 

ycbm

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. We're not going in blind.
Trust us, you are.

A yearling colt for two young kids just learning to ride, with parents who know nothing about horses either is the stuff of nightmares.

Your kids could get badly hurt.

Please

Don't

Do

This.




PS no reputable dealer would sell an inexperienced family like yours a yearling colt.
 
Last edited:

Ambers Echo

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He should not be turned out alone. You won't have the skills to train him to lead properly. So your 'walk on the moors' is likely to be him towing you water-ski style before ditching you and running off. Your kids are too young and will treat him like a cuddly pet so he will be ruined. I'd like to think this is a wind up but sadly I feel it isn't. So let me give yu a cautionary tale instead. Horse mad kid on our yard was bought a foal by well meaning but clueless parents. By 18 months it was a total yob. Friendly but clueless about boundaries. Offers of help and advice were rejected ( just like you seem to be rejecting the sound advice on here). YO finally lost patience and kicked it off when it badly injured another livery. She went to another yard where horse was turned out alone as unsafe to share a field. Become even more unruly and got kicked off again. Now unsellable and near enough unmanageable. Don't buy it! Please. I am very much a live and let live poster and rarely even comment on threads where people are doing tnings I thiunk are daft. But this really is a slow motion car crash in the making.
 

Bellaboo18

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The owner is going to turn it out with her youngsters. We jus need to have him gelded in October. The dealer is quite well known even are stable owner knows of him from the cob showing. His name is Harry stoyles. Has good reviews on Facebook alot of people have bought horses from him and are happy. It's a risk buying any horse from a dealer are a individual.
I'm off out so just did a quick search on this forum for the dealers name, I see someone posted in November they were just waiting for their court date with him.
 

Bellaboo18

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The owner is going to turn it out with her youngsters. We jus need to have him gelded in October. The dealer is quite well known even are stable owner knows of him from the cob showing. His name is Harry stoyles. Has good reviews on Facebook alot of people have bought horses from him and are happy. It's a risk buying any horse from a dealer are a individual.
Then why is he selling a yearling that you say looks poor and you feel sorry for.

I suppose the other explanation is you don't know what a 9 month old should look like?
 

Ambers Echo

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Just seen he is going out woth other youngsters but not till gelding. Maybe I am being too negative IF the yard is experienced in dealing with youngsters and are teaching your kids how to raise a foal properly. In theory our yard was suitable and many others have raised foals successfully there as YO has her own youngsters who run together with a few older ones to teach them manners. but it was a disaster as the owners themselves did not know whay they were doing and were too young and inexperienced to recognise the mistakes rhey were making.
 
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He must have company! Ideally other youngsters, plus an older safe 'nanny' who will teach him manners.

Youngsters just don't need horse walkers, fancy arenas etc... they need good basics. So turnout, shelter, water, forage to eat (grass/hay/haylage as applicable) company (other horses/ponies), farrier and vet as required and an experienced handler.
 
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He should not be turned out alone. You won't have the skills to train him to lead properly. So your 'walk on the moors' is likely to be him towing you water-ski style before ditching you and running off. Your kids are too young and will treat him like a cuddly pet so he will be ruined. I'd like to think this is a wind up but sadly I feel it isn't. So let me give yu a cautionary tale instead. Horse mad kid on our yard was bought a foal by well meaning but clueless parents. By 18 months it was a total yob. Friendly but clueless about boundaries. Offers of help and advice were rejected ( just like you seem to be rejecting the sound advice on here). YO finally lost patience and kicked it off when it badly injured another livery. She went to another yard where horse was turned out alone as unsafe to share a field. Become even more unruly and got kicked off again. Now unsellable and near enough unmanageable. Don't buy it! Please. I am very much a live and let live poster and rarely even comment on threads where people are doing tnings I thiunk are daft. But this really is a slow motion car crash in the making.
I understand we're your coming from but the stable will be working on him from day 1 to get him ready and to do all the training we haven't bought the horse yet we're just asking advise I'm not into horses I'm more into my cars and bikes to be honest. I'm not rushing to buy was just looking for advice on passport side of things. The stable is Mill field stud farm a bit of a mix of reviews even some off this forum. We were going up to hermits coop at Barnsley once lockdown is over
 
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He must have company! Ideally other youngsters, plus an older safe 'nanny' who will teach him manners.

Youngsters just don't need horse walkers, fancy arenas etc... they need good basics. So turnout, shelter, water, forage to eat (grass/hay/haylage as applicable)company (other horses/ponies), farrier and vet as required and an experienced handler.
we have been looking at Welsh section c at 3 year old need backing we are not set on a certain horse age etc and I'm happy for the advice
 

be positive

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The owner is going to turn it out with her youngsters. We jus need to have him gelded in October. The dealer is quite well known even are stable owner knows of him from the cob showing. His name is Harry stoyles. Has good reviews on Facebook alot of people have bought horses from him and are happy. It's a risk buying any horse from a dealer are a individual.
If this dealer is 'good' then he can easily arrange the passport, get at least the tetanus jabs done and get it gelded before delivery, you can pay the costs and at least get the poor thing turned out in the group, although as a YO who teaches children I would not be advising you to buy something so unsuitable for them as a first pony, I would question any yard that was encouraging you to buy anything young, an older pony that has been there doing the job is a far better option and they are often available for loan so no outlay at this stage.
 

ycbm

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The owner is going to turn it out with her youngsters. We jus need to have him gelded in October. The dealer is quite well known even are stable owner knows of him from the cob showing. His name is Harry stoyles. Has good reviews on Facebook alot of people have bought horses from him and are happy.

I'm sorry Lee, but you'd be amazed by the chicanery that goes on in horse dealing. This is sounding like a collusion between the livery owner, who is going to make a lot of money out of livery and training for a horse your family don't know how to manage, and a dodgy dealer selling an unsuitable horse to a naive buyer.


It's a risk buying any horse from a dealer or an individual.
It wouldn't matter if you bought this yearling from Saint Theresa, its the wrong one for your family.


No reputable dealer would sell you a yearling colt.
 
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We've looked into loan but the ones near us say no children are no novice riders so limits us to buying were just looking at the minute theirs a few older horse but most need backing are putting back to work. Is a filly a better option than a colt. I'm not in rush to buy. We've been to the stables and looked round and spoke to the owner. She described what she would do has she has shown horses for years and had a few foals over that time.
 

be positive

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I'm sorry Lee, but you'd be amazed by the chicanery that goes on in horse dealing. This is sounding like a collusion between the livery owner, who is going to make a lot of money out of livery and training for a horse your family don't know how to manage, and a dodgy dealer selling an unsuitable horse to a naive buyer.




It wouldn't matter if you bought this yearling from Saint Theresa, its the wrong one for your family.


No reputable dealer would sell you a yearling colt.

It does sound very much like the YO is gaining from this arrangement.
 
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