Lunging advice please

spider

Well-Known Member
Joined
14 October 2004
Messages
1,522
having a problem with lunging my boy. On his stiffer rein he keeps trying to come in. I keep very close to his hindquarters rather than the centre of the circle but he twists his neck and still manages to do it. I almost feel like I need a second rein. When riding a circle I have to use the outside rein a lot as he does the same thing.Would side reins make him stay straight? What do you attach them to, a roller or the saddle? Any advice gratefully received thank you.
 

Flashbacksj

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 February 2009
Messages
139
Location
North West
Could you not do as you said and lunge with 2 reins.. like this:
http://www.yourhorse.co.uk/upload/8039/images/lungeing%20with%20two.JPG[IMG]

[url]http://www.yourhorse.co.uk/Improve-your-riding/Search-Results/How-to/Long-reining-made-easy-Part-3---Lungeing-with-two-lines/[/url]

would depend on how experienced you are lunging tho!

Im no expert but justthought it might help! x
 

Kenzo

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 February 2008
Messages
13,929
Location
Yorkshire
I'd stick to slowing the paces down or just reducing amount of fast work until he becomes more supple.

Also daily stretching exercises which if you have one, your back person will be able go over with you to ensure your doing them correctly, this will improve any stiffness over time and make it more comfortable for him to work on both reins.

Also working on larger circle will help while your doing the above as well as some warm up stretches before you begin your lunge work.

Personally I would put side reins purely because I'd want to see if the above shows an improvement so he's going willingly and comfortably on that rein with the restriction of side reins because he may be uncomfortable...even if they are pretty loose.

Not only that but side reins do not stop them from whipping round or turning in.

I'm sure you'll notice a difference when you find out whats niggling him.
 

VioletStripe

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 July 2008
Messages
4,279
Location
Kent/Sussex Borders
Side reins usually help to balance them out. I would usually attatch them to the roller, because I never used to lunge in a saddle! You could try pointing the whip at his shoulder to try and push him out? If not you could long rein him, or free school him! :) xx
 

milliepops

Wears headscarf aggressively
Joined
26 July 2008
Messages
27,480
If you can't coordinate the 2 reins, I would
1. add some side reins or similar - you can attach them to saddle or roller, doesn't matter

2. Try to say slightly 'behind' the horse as you say you have been - if he starts to fall in, send him on. But don't exaggerate this too much or you can find the horse loses a connection with you in the middle of the circle. Try to keep the triangular shape with your lungeline and whip

3. When he tries to come in, make yourself more imposing (put your arms out to your sides, step forwards towards him and stand up taller, so that he feels you sending him away from you

I was always taught never to step backwards away from a horse when lunging - the above method to send a horse away from you instead seems to work most of the time. You can also flick the whip gently in the direction of his shoulder (I don't normally find this necessary).
 

spider

Well-Known Member
Joined
14 October 2004
Messages
1,522
Thank you everyone. lots of food for thought there. I think it is more of an evasion than a physical problem but was thinking of having physio out anyway. I thnk you are right Milliepops about triangle shape. He takes no notice of a lunge whip pointed at his shoulder and I am probably just not imposing enough. If I do enough to stop him coming in, he will buck and leap about and I usually end up letting go. Think I might have a lesson from my instructor. He jumps to attention when he hears her voice!
 
Top