magnetic boots -good investment/waste of money?

LeannePip

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any one have any experience of magnetic boots - i was thinking of purchasing a set of these boots to pop on after x/c, canter work and just in general to bring any puffyness down. my farrier thinks she has underactive lymfnodes? so when shes stood still for too long (over night) she gets slightlypuffy legs which soon goes when she moves? any one had good bad/experiences with using magnetic boots ?
 

HarlequinSeren

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I have one for my boy who has had lymphangitis in the past and one of his hinds swells up when he's in overnight. I have found it does bring the puffiness down well, though whether that's because of the actual magnets or just because the wrap thing itself heats his leg up (and increases circulation or whatever) I don't know. I know a lot of people think they're useless but mine has worked pretty well for my boy.
 

alsiola

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They may help via the fact that they are a boot, but the magnets do nothing. Some simple stable bandages would do the same job. Mild fluctuant swelling of the tendon sheath (windgalls) that disappears with exercise is, however, extremely common and very rarely a problem.
 

intouch

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I wouldn't be without them I have had a pair of Bioflow boots for over 10 years, they have helped I'm sure a dozen different horses through lamenesses, injuries, abscesses. Don't know how they do what they do, but they have worked for me.
 

Marydoll

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I have a set each for my arthritic horses and wouldnt be without them, as they were so effective, i also got a magnet rug for my old girl and it goes atound all 3 of my guys. Definitely an investment
 

Natch

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Scientifically very little has been done on researching their use in horses, so Im not sure on what basis alsiola is making that claim. Magnets have been proven to have an effect on blood flow in human scientific studies.

Anecdotally, my arthritic dog wore a bioflow collar, and my goodness she didn't half move a lot more stiffly when we left it off for 2 days. Collar back on = more sound dog. Since she was walked on a different collar we forgot to replace it a handful of times with the same effect, so we are convinced it helped her greatly. Perhaps oddly I found a magnetic bracelet has done nothing for my own tendonosis.

Try it, it won't do any harm. Of course, the best solution to your concerns would be 24 hour turnout ;)
 

bumblelion

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I have a set of bioflows for my arthritic boy. He only wears them during the night in the stable in winter but comes out less stiff and seems more comfortable. Couldn't be without them!
 

bumblelion

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Meant to say, had the boots now 3 years and I find them that good that iv bought a collar for my rottie who's showing arthritic signs! May even get myself a bracelet for my knees!
 

alsiola

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Scientifically very little has been done on researching their use in horses, so Im not sure on what basis alsiola is making that claim.
Firstly, on exactly that basis. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, and that evidence does not exist.

Magnets have been proven to have an effect on blood flow in human scientific studies.
Secondly, on the basis that the above statement is incorrect.

Mayrovitz HN and others. Assessment of the short-term effects of a permanent magnet on normal skin blood circulation via laser-Doppler flowmetry. Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine 6(1):9-12, 2002]
Martel GF, Andrews SC, Roseboom CG. Comparison of static and placebo magnets on resting forearm blood flow in young, healthy men. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2002;32:518-524.


Thirdly, on the basis of the physiology of the tendon sheath. Fluid is produced by filtration from blood, so increasing blood flow will increase the amount of fluid. Drainage occurs mainly by lymphatics. Even if we accepted the unfounded assertion that magnetic boots improved blood flow, this is manifestly the opposite of what we desire in this case.
 

LeannePip

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]

Try it, it won't do any harm. Of course, the best solution to your concerns would be 24 hour turnout ;)
i like many others on here would love to have 24/7 turn out over the winter but alas its probably not an option i will just have to wait untill april when they can go out 24/7 for the summer:rolleyes:

i think im going to get a pair she can travel home from competitions in may not have any effect but atleast it makes me feel better if i think i've done something wether it works or not!
 

meandmyself

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I tried a magnetic bracelet a while ago and it did nothing but knock me sick. I felt fine with it off, but put it on and I just wanted to throw up.
 

Natch

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Firstly, on exactly that basis. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, and that evidence does not exist.

Just because something has not been scientifically studied, does not mean that the phenomenon does not exist. ;) Even the most scientifically minded of us must accept that fact. Under such assumptions science becomes almost religion-like, since before the study of evolution, the study of stem cells, the existance of other planets and so on would all at one point have been considered untrue.

Secondly, on the basis that the above statement is incorrect.

Mayrovitz HN and others. Assessment of the short-term effects of a permanent magnet on normal skin blood circulation via laser-Doppler flowmetry. Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine 6(1):9-12, 2002]
Martel GF, Andrews SC, Roseboom CG. Comparison of static and placebo magnets on resting forearm blood flow in young, healthy men. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2002;32:518-524.


Thirdly, on the basis of the physiology of the tendon sheath. Fluid is produced by filtration from blood, so increasing blood flow will increase the amount of fluid. Drainage occurs mainly by lymphatics. Even if we accepted the unfounded assertion that magnetic boots improved blood flow, this is manifestly the opposite of what we desire in this case.

They may help via the fact that they are a boot, but the magnets do nothing. Some simple stable bandages would do the same job. Mild fluctuant swelling of the tendon sheath (windgalls) that disappears with exercise is, however, extremely common and very rarely a problem.
[\QUOTE]


Please excuse me for I am piddled while I write this :)D) but the reference you cite is for humans and short-term use, yet the majority of manufacturers' literature will advise longer term use. This literature review seems to conclude that the majority of literature finds that magnetic fields have an effect on blood perfusion and pressure, even though they can't agree on what effect that is:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/bem.20284/abstract

I don't pretend to know what they work on, nor why they appear to help certain animals and humans and not others. I actually recently refused to write a BSc level report on magnets due to the complete lack of scientific research on them. But I stand by the assertion that I have seen with my own eyes the positive effect they have on both a stallion and a dog with arthritis, to the extent that it cannot be considered simple coincidence. Whether or not it can help fluid accumulation in the distal limb I don't actually know, but if we are both agreed that there is no negative effect then what is the harm in trying?

I do however agree that windgalls and mild swelling which appears when the horse is subject to limited movement, and disappears when moderate exercise is reintroduced is rarely a problem.
 

alsiola

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Just because something has not been scientifically studied, does not mean that the phenomenon does not exist. ;) Even the most scientifically minded of us must accept that fact. Under such assumptions science becomes almost religion-like, since before the study of evolution, the study of stem cells, the existance of other planets and so on would all at one point have been considered untrue.

I wouldn't consider them untrue without evidence, simply unstudied. I don't think that static magnet therapy fits into the category of unstudied, but into the category of studied and found ineffective.

Please excuse me for I am piddled while I write this :)D) but the reference you cite is for humans and short-term use, yet the majority of manufacturers' literature will advise longer term use. This literature review seems to conclude that the majority of literature finds that magnetic fields have an effect on blood perfusion and pressure, even though they can't agree on what effect that is:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/bem.20284/abstract


That paper isn't looking at low powered static magnets like those in boots/bandages etc., but at the effects of high powered magnetic fields as found in MRI machines.

I don't pretend to know what they work on, nor why they appear to help certain animals and humans and not others. I actually recently refused to write a BSc level report on magnets due to the complete lack of scientific research on them. But I stand by the assertion that I have seen with my own eyes the positive effect they have on both a stallion and a dog with arthritis, to the extent that it cannot be considered simple coincidence. Whether or not it can help fluid accumulation in the distal limb I don't actually know, but if we are both agreed that there is no negative effect then what is the harm in trying?

One's own eyes can never be trusted. As humans we are programmed to see causative links, and to make associations where there are none. Randomised PCTs are the only way to unravel the truth.

I do however agree that windgalls and mild swelling which appears when the horse is subject to limited movement, and disappears when moderate exercise is reintroduced is rarely a problem.

what is the harm in trying?

1) It is a waste of money - ultimately this could influence future treatment of the horse.
2) It provides validation of an ineffective treatment that may encourage it use by others for less benign conditions - having personally seen some nasty examples of magnetic therapy delaying veterinary attendance for laminitis, this is not a minor point.
3) It is not entirely harmless. I have seen horses with contact allergies to bandage material (e.g. neoprene), and one horse that was euthanased with an infected tendon sheath due to a wound caused by overtight bandages. I know these are the exceptions rather than the rule, but they do occur. No risk is acceptable when there is no benefit.
 

MrsMozart

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No idea as to the official answer.

When I use a magnetic back pad and quarter pad on my horses they all relax wonderfully. None of them have back issues per se, one has a wonky pelvis and one a sacroilliac joint issue, but I use it as a therapeutic device and it seems to work in that they relax, they move freerer through their backs, and none of them object to having it on, which the DWB certainly would if she wasn't happy with it.
 

lazybee

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The short answer is if magnets did anything, they would be mainstream not alternative. High powered MRI scans have no effect on people. So why should a low powered magnet do anything?
 

jellyshark

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I have used and found magnetic boots really good for stopping/reducing puffiness however the most effective I have found is a magnetic band that the horse can wear 24/7. My horse has a capped knee that has gone up and down however with the band it has stayed down. He also gets filled back legs at night the one band on the front has changed this. I have used these on 2-3 horses for differant reasons wind galls filling etc. The beauty of them is that you can turn out in them too. Also don't the effect of long term boot use!
 

muff747

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Well I loved my Equilibrium magnetic boots and used them to keep swelling down on my boys back legs if he had to be stabled. I am very happy to try alternative, non drug remedies and some work, some don't.
The magnetic stable chaps did work BUT...
eventually the strip magnets broke up into bits so I had to leave them out until I could find some replacements. He just wore the chaps without the magnets, and they work just the same. That's probably due to the heat again so I'm divided about whether I would pay the extra for the magnets if I got some more.
As it happens, I did buy some stable chaps without magnets just for warmth on freezing nights and his legs are never swollen when I take them off.
 

Wagtail

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I don't know if magnets work or not. I bought an armadillo rug for my horse who has had 5 of his spinal processes removed due to KS, and he is coming on brilliantly so far. I don't know whether any of this is due to me putting the magnetic rug on him for 2 - 3 hours daily or whether he is just healing well. I am hoping to be able to ride him for the first time post op next week.
 

fatpiggy

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I use magnetic wraps rather than boots (more versatile as to wear you can put them) and bought them only after I'd observed the improvement in a friend's elderly (30s) pony, and also when he got laminitis. My previous vet admitted he had wanted to put down an old pony with arthritis which took to cantering around the field again once it got some magnetic boots. I'm quite sure my old girl still benefits a bit from them although her arthritis is now extremely bad. Don't forget the British Olympic team from a few years ago all wore magnetic rugs after competing and the team vet said they recovered faster. If its good enough for them, its good enough for me! Incidentally, the wraps certainly do SOMETHING for my horse as within 10 minutes she startes wanting to bite and scratch at them. She isn't bothered by bandages or tendon boots etc. which are made of the same material so it can't just be a case of her legs heating up under them.

I bought mine on Ebay and got a bargain.
 

jaffa2311

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IMO, the reason your horse's legs swell up after excess strain from competing and hard work is because she is only three and it is putting alot of strain on the joints thus causing swelling.

Please listen to everyone's advice and slow down for the sake of your youngster.
 

Renvers

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IMO, the reason your horse's legs swell up after excess strain from competing and hard work is because she is only three and it is putting alot of strain on the joints thus causing swelling.

Please listen to everyone's advice and slow down for the sake of your youngster.
:confused: - not aware of the history here, but I would think magnets will not replace good horse management in any situation.

I have not read the majority of scientific research on magnets but did read some relating to the affect the magnetic field has on iron in the blood and that this may explain the actual/percieved improvement in the area.

Also agree with the post regarding long term and short term usage having different impacts.

Personally I am happy with the use of magnets and have heard enough anecdotal evidence of people finding improvements to give it a shot. Although telling which are the good quality products is difficult.
 
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