Measuring "bone"?

Kacey88

New Member
Joined
5 September 2011
Messages
720
Location
Ireland
I have found conflicting advice in how to measure a horse's bone and I am now confused! I read somewhere that its measured half way down the cannon bone, but now I have just read that its just below the knee, the widest oart of the cannon bone. These result in way different measurements for my cob! Trying to assess her for show cob potential, please help!

Also, any advice on what else to help me decide if she's a show cob or not greatly appreciated.

Thanks for any help :)
 

onemoretime

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 April 2008
Messages
1,660
Just below the knee is the correct place to measure. A horse was always said to be good if it had 4 inches of bone below the knee. That's TB horses, some have a bit more nowadays.
 

TBB

New Member
Joined
1 October 2010
Messages
475
Just below the knee is the correct place to measure. A horse was always said to be good if it had 4 inches of bone below the knee. That's TB horses, some have a bit more nowadays.
We'd consider ours light of bone if they had less than 7 inches, when we are looking at TB stallions to breed sporthorses we'd love to find 9 inches but invariable have to settle on 8 and a half, wouldn't consider one with only 4 inches.
 
Joined
3 February 2010
Messages
869
4 inches? Is that even possible?
Even my dainty little Arab has 7 inches and she has tiny legs. Could any horse carry weight with 4 inch legs?
 

Kacey88

New Member
Joined
5 September 2011
Messages
720
Location
Ireland
I have always wondered if splints can distort measurement of bone...
I would assume so, never thought of it though! I was confused because at the slightest part she has 8cms, but just below the knee, or say, 1cm below, she has a good 8.5, maybe a bit more.

So, can I assume she has 8.5?

Thanks for the help everyone :)
 

onemoretime

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 April 2008
Messages
1,660
We'd consider ours light of bone if they had less than 7 inches, when we are looking at TB stallions to breed sporthorses we'd love to find 9 inches but invariable have to settle on 8 and a half, wouldn't consider one with only 4 inches.
Sorry dont know what I was thinking of then too much sloe gin I think. yes of course it is around 8.5 to 9 inches of bone. God 4 inches would be a stick insect. Sorry
 
Joined
3 February 2010
Messages
869
No it wouldn't as there is no muscle below the knee!! Only tendons and ligaments. The legs are the first thing to finish growing in length at about 18months and by 3/4 years they will have reached full thickness.
 

Spiritedly

Well-Known Member
Joined
1 December 2011
Messages
1,509
Does that include cobs? only I know a lot of people say they grow slower. The reason I ask is my coblet is about 2 1/2 and when I measured today his bone was 8 1/4 and my 2 yr old Newfies is 8 and I wad curious if it would increase.
 
Joined
19 July 2010
Messages
18,870
Does that include cobs?
Yes :)

It is a myth that different breeds mature (skeletally) at different rates. The only exception is very large horses which take about 6 months extra for all the growth plates to 'fuse'.
 
Joined
6 January 2012
Messages
410
Location
Surrey
That and gelding a horse. My lecturer told us when you remove the testosterone it takes slightly longer for the growth plates to close as the testosterone is a trigger to close them... a slighlty interesting fact for the day!
 

Spiritedly

Well-Known Member
Joined
1 December 2011
Messages
1,509
That and gelding a horse. My lecturer told us when you remove the testosterone it takes slightly longer for the growth plates to close as the testosterone is a trigger to close them... a slighlty interesting fact for the day!
I remember reading this before...if I remember correctly it was something like if gelded before 18 months they tend to grow taller but if left later they are stockier?
 

GCC

New Member
Joined
30 December 2011
Messages
38
Location
North West
I remember reading this before...if I remember correctly it was something like if gelded before 18 months they tend to grow taller but if left later they are stockier?
that would make sense i worked with a connie who had been cut the second his testes dropped and he was stood at 16hh as a 4 year old but was as slight as anything took forever to mature. Funny thing was bother parents were 148cm's and he was blood typed and DNA tested... think some form of Irish Sport horse throw back must have been in his lines! sorry that's slightly off topic..

when training for my stages i was taught to measure just below knee and 7-8 was light, 8-9 was medium and 9+ was heavyweight if i remember correctly. But this was never my strong point!
 
Top