Might be the worst.

MagicMelon

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My 17 yr old shetland is not in a good way. She's been lame for about 6 weeks now all because the farrier screwed up her hooves in a massive way (we may be reporting him) and possibly she kept coming down with laminitis as well.

We've now had the first session with a proper barefoot trimmer who thinks it will take about a year for her hooves to be returned to normal. She had her first trim about 2 weeks ago. The trimmer said she might have a few days of lameness as she gets used to the changes in her hooves. I might add that this isn't any crazy intensive trim (like Strasser etc.) and she barely took much off, its a very natural trim which she does very slowly over time.

For the past 10 days Id say she's been absolutely cronic lame. I mean, it's very obviously sore to walk at all. Although she has still been grazing (on the tiny paddock she's on as trimmer said she needs to stay out to move around) and is certainly not off her feed or hay.

I have had her on bute the last few days but it's done nothing which I find very odd. She was up the field shivering today (it had been raining all night) so I had to put her into the stable to warm her up. It took her about 10 minutes just to get down to the stable, hobbling the entire way. I feel so helpless for her. She's been lame too long now, and I just dont know if she'll improve. The barefoot trimmer has said she may be lame for longer than her usual horses to begin with if she has laminitis along with it but I dont believe she does. But it's very difficult to tell since she's lame all round (her hooves aren't hot and she isn't leaning back etc.).

It's hard to know what to do though because she has had bad bouts of laminitis since she got it badly last year when out on loan, our vet thinks because she's had it on and off (including over the winter which isn't right) that it may be cushings. Either way, Ive had times when I have thought it was the end for her but then she's come right and been tanking round the field again! It's just been a yo-yo since the end of last summer I think.

The vets coming out in the next 2 hours. But Im absolutely dreading it. I really am fearing the worst as I just have this dreadful feeling. I dont know what to do. I certainly dont want her suffering anymore but at the same time I want to give her the very best chance at coming through it.
 

TGM

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Have you had a Cushings test done on the pony? If she tests positive you can then put her on Pergolide which should help control the recurrent laminitis, assuming that is what is at the root of her lameness.
 

MagicMelon

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I dont think it is laminitis right now though. It is hard to tell but she's definately not giving off her usual symptoms. It simply looks like she's very very sore all round. My farrier really did screw her hooves up to the point they began growing very oddly which in turn made her very lame. When the trimmer did her, she improved almost straight away (not sound but much better) and was fine for maybe 3 days after.

I think it is her hoof problems but Im not sure what it could be?

No, we haven't had a cushings test yet. But will have one done if thats what the vet recommends.
 

Evil_Cookie

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If its her soles that are sore what about taping some pads on to see if that gives her any relief? Is she happier on softer surfaces, ie... a thick bed of shavings?
 

JACQSZOO

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Dont despair. A barefoot trimmer lamed my friends horse quite badly and bought on mild laminitus. Vet advised to keep him in on a very deep shavings bed on bute and advised it would take about a month for him to become anywhere near sound. This was a good two/three months ago now. He is now sound in the paddock but is feeling the hard ground.
 

brightmount

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Was your pony barefoot before (when you had the farrier)? If so, it would be unusual for an EP trim to make the horse lame, as it should be non-invasive with changes made over the long term, so I'm surprised at this and would be interested in what trim you had.

If the horse was previously shod, it would be natural for it to be feeling the ground now it is barefoot, and you should be on a conditioning programme of several months. If the trimmer left you no conditioning instructions, that would sound a warning bell to me.

The horse would almost certainly be more comfortable in boots with Solemates pads inside. They are usually used just for riding and conditioning but I know some people use them for turnout, so long as the horse isn't out 24/7. The ground has been baked hard with the recent hot weather. Your horse may get some relief now it has turned a bit wetter.

Have you spoken to your trimmer to express your concerns? A reputable trimmer will be supporting you at every step, especially the initial stages when it is easy to get discouraged. She will know if your horse is experiencing a normal response or if there is cause for concern.
 

ISHmad

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Might be worth getting your vet to do some x-rays to see if there has been any rotation of the pedal bone as a result of the laminitis. Trimmers can still work through this, but would give everyone a better idea of what you are dealing with. Agree with everyone else re getting some blood tests done as well.

Hope your little one is okay.
 

samp

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Oh dear, I would think of getting xrays carried out as well. If he is lame in all 4 there is a possibility that they have laminitis. Your vet should be able to diagnose it so fingers crossed
 

MagicMelon

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Vet has just been. She thinks its chronic (long term) laminitis, although she has looked at her small paddock and agrees there's not much grass at all to have caused it. She agrees her hooves are in a state still and wondered if the trimmer could take off a bit more of her toe to help, but I doubt the trimmer would as she said she took as much as she was willing to last time. She's due back mid-June. Vet has advised to keep her in for 2 days (on a thick shavings bed), on bute for 3 days and then every other day for a week. Then we'll see how she is. If she's the same, then we'll have to get a cushings test done, which Im dreading. She says it will take her a few months to come totally right but she should be moving better than she is now quite soon. She did mention x-rays which I guess we'll think about after this 10 days if she's not improving at all.

Evil-Cookie, This is what the barefoot trimmer has recommended but the vet didn't recommend it just now for some reason.

lynwood, Yes she's a shetland who's always been used as a companion since we got her as a 3yo (she's now 17). So never been shod. The trim she had was non-invasive, I was surprised at how little she took off but she explained it to me so it made sense why. She said she might go lame for a couple of days while she gets used to the slight change, but it has been almost 2 weeks. Conditioning-programme wise she told us to leave her out 24/7 (which she is anyway). She mentioned also having a stoney area (like pebbles) round her water trough which apparently helps toughen them up. Also told us to do the usual things like pick her feet out thoroughly etc. She said exercising her would help a lot over differing terrain but obviously this is not possible right now. Is this all correct?? Where could I get these boots with "Solemates pads"? I wonder if they would fit, considering her hooves aren't the usual shape right now - they're very long and narrow.

Thanks guys for your input, its all much appreciated. Poor little girl was lying flat out in the stable when the vet arrived. She's now got a nice shavings bed and Ive put a sheep gate across the doorway so she can see out which will keep her much happier. Seems to be happily munching her hay. It's weird, I would think that if she's so sore then she would have gone off her feed.
 

alisonpook

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Hi - I would be tempted to have a Cushings test or simple insulin test done sooner rather than later as if it should prove positive and you opt for the pergolide route it can take a few weeks to take effect. Hope you manage to get her comfortable soon.
 

ISHmad

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You can buy the sole mate pads from your trimmer usually. You then trim them to size. Or if you have got any tiny hoof boots for your pony you can buy comfort pads to fit in them, either 6mm thick or 12 mm thick depending on what you need. I got mine from The Saddlery Shop and their service was great.

The point of the pads is to stimulate the frog and sole, plus provide some support. I would be tempted to have another chat with your trimmer and see what he or she says.

Bless your little pony, she sounds like a little star coping with all this. Hope she is on the mend soon.
 

brightmount

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As ISH said, your trimmer ought to be able to supply Sole Mates, otherwise, they are available from America here:

http://www.equinepodiatry.net/Hoof%20Care%20Products.htm

I dug out some of my offcuts to see if I had any scraps big enough for your shettie although I think they may not be, although I've got one used pair with a bit of life left if you want to PM me.

The packaging states: "Used in the treatment of acute laminitis. Applies even pressure over entire solar surface helping to prevent rotation. Prevents further trauma during rehabilitation". So apart from barefoot conditioning and protection from concussion, they would help if your horse has some form of laminitis. I don't know if you can get boots shettie sized but you can tape the pads on with duck tape.

My EP will shortly be a UK supplier for Sole Mates, Cleantrax, Boots and other barefoot supplies that have previously only been available from the USA, to anyone, not just his clients.
 

measles

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Sorry to hear of your Shetland's problems. I don't know it this will help at all but we have had very similar problems with our NF pony who is due to foal any day now.

Last summer (when she was on box rest for a leg injury) for no reason she went very lame after being shod - she was hirpling around her stable. We got vet out straight away and he could find nothing wrong - there was no digital pulse or lamanitic pose. We made an apt at the vet hospital and on day 5 when we took her there she was sound again. They xrayed and nothing wrong.

Since then she has had her shoes off and has been turned out in a smallish paddock with a short cover of grass during the day and in at night. Three trims ago she went really alme and got better after about 5 days, the time before last she was fine and 2 weeks ago she had the tinyiest trim and has been very lame since. Vet has been out again, farrier has been asking all his contacts and we have no idea what is causing this.

I feel awful as can't give her bute etc as in foal - vet recommends only if she is in catastrophic pain - but she is hobbling, though a little less so on grass.


MagicMelon - I hope your pony improves soon as I know what a worry it is.
 

brightmount

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[ QUOTE ]
I feel awful as can't give her bute etc as in foal - vet recommends only if she is in catastrophic pain - but she is hobbling, though a little less so on grass.

[/ QUOTE ]

You could give her Pernamax Equine which is a natural anti-inflammatory derived from green lipped mussels. I give this to my horse who I hope to put in foal this summer, so I checked with maxavita that I could continue, and they replied, "Pernamax is very safe, ideal for nursing and pregnancy. It is made from 100% natural ingredients and will be perfect for her."

http://www.maxavita.com/products/pet/pernamaxequine/
 

bensababy

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[ QUOTE ]
Vet has just been. She thinks its chronic (long term) laminitis, although she has looked at her small paddock and agrees there's not much grass at all to have caused it. She agrees her hooves are in a state still and wondered if the trimmer could take off a bit more of her toe to help, but I doubt the trimmer would as she said she took as much as she was willing to last time. She's due back mid-June. Vet has advised to keep her in for 2 days (on a thick shavings bed), on bute for 3 days and then every other day for a week. Then we'll see how she is. If she's the same, then we'll have to get a cushings test done, which Im dreading. She says it will take her a few months to come totally right but she should be moving better than she is now quite soon. She did mention x-rays which I guess we'll think about after this 10 days if she's not improving at all.



It doesnt take alot of grass for them to get Lammi - the stressed grass is more dangerous - so no matter how much grass is out there it doesnt make it any better.
My pony had chronic lammi in all 4 feet, in my opinion i would get her xrayed to check for pedal bone rotation then work with the feet from there - if there is rotation - toes should not be trimmed that far back.
 

MagicMelon

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Thanks everyone.

Is there anyone in the UK who does Sole Mates? I think it's going to take too long to buy them from the USA. I have emailed my trimmer to see if she sells them, but if not would like to buy some somewhere.

I will look into the Pernamax, thanks.

She's lying down again just now. It's proving a pest trying to get the bute into her as she's being really picky! Ive already tried feeding it in a tiny bit of apple chaff but she refused it. Then tried packing it into apples but she still left some. Any ideas how to get the bute into her??
 

TGM

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Have you tried mixing it in some speedibeet or alfabeet? Think both are Laminitus Trust approved and are a better consistency for mixing bute in than chaff type feeds. Other options are syringing as has been mentioned, putting bute in freezer before using to mask the taste/smell, or asking your vet whether Danilon might be a suitable alternative as it is more palatable.
 

henryhorn

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I'm glad your vet agreed to see how she goes but would disagree with the barefoot trimmer's advice especially re pebbles.
What I would do is keep her inside on a deep bed of shavings with some sort of supports on her frogs. (we used rubber over reach boot cut into trangle shape and fastened on with sticky bandages.)
Anything that is lying flat out with pain doesn't need "toughening up....
All you can do for now is keep her eating old hay soaked to remove some of the nutrients and give her painkilling medicaton.
I know a little about barefoot horses as at least 35 of them here go barefoot.
They do go slightly tender when the shoes are first removed but never in the way you describe your pony is suffering, so it's far more likely to be laminitic related than anything else, especially if the vet agrees the feet need more off.
After a few months they get rock had feet, even the ones with dodgy feet to start with.
I don't use a barefoot trimmer more a normal farrier ,and some of the horses rarely need much at all. Left to their own devices they wear their feet into a natural shape, some in fact look as if they have just been beautifully trimmed!
Others get regular trims due to fast grwing feet.
I'd just cosset her for now and see how comfy you can make her..
 

ISHmad

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I still think this pony has some pedal bone rotation to be in so much pain, and think sole mates would be a good idea. Your trimmer should have some sole mates, these don't just "toughen up" their feet, but provide valuable support in these cases.
 

H-J

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Who has been doing her feet the 14 (ish) years you have had her, why have you changed the way you do her feet when she is lame?
 
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