Months trial

smokeybabes

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Anything i should consider before letting my horse go for a months trial pre-sale?
I'm guessing i'll have to give them the passport? I'll obviously photocopy it and keep copies myself.
Should i ask for a deposit?
Also if you were selling a horse would you let it go out on a months trial? Just a bit worried if these people are time wasters or don't get on with him then i'll have to pay to readvertise in a months time, then if somebody else wants a months trial it could go on forever! But at the same time it'd be nice to know he's going somewhere where they get on with him!
So thoughts on months trials pre-purchase?
 

Taffyhorse

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I would prefer to have all the cash up front with an agreement stating they have him on a months trial and can return him with a full refund if he turns out to be unsuitable.

I'd be very wary of sending him out on trial with no security. Do you know anything about his potential purchasers?
 

frazzled

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I wouldn't let my horse go on trial. To many horror stories. A favourite at this time of year is people looking for a free horse for PC camp then returning it saying not suitable.
 

smokeybabes

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Don't think he'd be used as a PC camp horse as i'm only selling him as a hacker as he's not done much over last few years and they're not a PC family.
But it does worry me they'll just have a horse free for a month, or of course the horror stories of horses being out on loan and being sold on.
They seem trustworthy but i don't know much about them so can't help but worry.
Trouble is people don't seem to want to buy without having the horse on trial, and i can see there reasons for doing so.
Think i might ask if they'd be willing to pay upfront and i'll refund if he doesn't work out. And if this trial doesn't work out don't think i'll be willing to let him out on trial again.
 

Amymay

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Let them come and trial the horse with you.

I wouldn't even consider asking for a trial.......
 

smokeybabes

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They've been to try the horse, and i said they woud be welcome to come back again if they wanted to but they asked for a months trial.
I said i wasn't sure so i am going to see where he will be kept first.
A lot of people have asked me about "loan with view to buy" which i have said no to as i want to sell and don't suddenly want them handing my horse back in 6-12 months time.
But i can see benefits of a trial. If they like him and get on with him they are likely to keep him whereas if they buy him and don't like him he might get sold on again very quickly, which doesn't seem fair on him!
Selling a horse is so stressful!
 

CBAnglo

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Completely agree. If they must have a trial, it should be at your own yard. Otherwise no. Too many peope send horse back after a week because "it is a complete nightmare" withouth even giving the horse the chance to settle in.

Also, query why you would need a trail for a hacking horse - surely they tried it out? Hence they should know what it is like to hack. Not as if it is a comp horse and they want to see what it is like away from home/under pressure etc.

In short - I would never agree to a trial, nor would I ask for one.
 

OWLIE185

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I would not do it but if you do do it then make sure the horse is vetted before he leaves you so that there is no doubt about the condition he was in.

Also make sure that your horse is both Freezemarked and Micro-chipped.

Have a contract drawn up and checked by a specialist equine solicitor so that both parties know their obligations.
 

jumpthemoon

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I have sent a horse out on trial before as I really liked the lady and she wanted a weeks trial. The horse was fine and settled in, then was vetted at her yard. He failed and we came to an agreement and she had him - but I had 100% confidence in the horse in terms of how it would behave for her etc and she was fairly close by.

I wouldn't agree to a trial now as I've heard too many horror stories and I also know my horse would not settle straight in - new owners would need to get to know him for a while. I don't see a problem with them trialling him at your yard if they have to, tbh
 

Booboos

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Too many things could go wrong, but if you do go ahead, I would:
- ask for all the money up front
- ask them to arrange for insurance and show you proof
- have a written agreement, stating that they need to contact you if the horse is unwell or they are having any problems
- also stating what they are and are not allowed to do with the horse, e.g. hacking alone, on a busy road, hunting, going to shows, turn out with other horses, etc.
- agree who will pay farrier, etc during the period and also who will cover any vet fees that might come up. Also detail the food the horse is on any other special treatments (sunblock, boots, etc.).
- have a full inventory of all the tack that is going with the horse and whether any of it is included in the sale price
- how much notice they need to give you if they do not want the horse, and that you can visit to check on the horse
 

Fazzie

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When I bought Boo, I paid for him upfront but on his receipt it stated that I had 6 weeks to return him if he proved unsuitable,(owner wanted this) vet fees during that time and any other fees would be down to me, and if I decided about getting him clipped he would be returned with a turn out rug, also stated on there that i was to give her first refusal if i ever sold and she even wrote that in his passport.
She also put on there that I wasnt to change him name, I tried to keep it but it was welshy and hard to say!! so ended up changing it but i'd still call him by his old name to her if she ever called
 

Creaturescape

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Noooo...... don't do it. People shouldn't ask. Its too rude - anything could happen to your horse and then the most seemingly lovely people can really change their spots!!! I've just sold my mare and I had a couple of people view her and ask for a trial. I said no to both and then the right people came along - they knew what they wanted and she matched that, so the sale was done, no haggling no nonsense. Don't let people back you into a corner where you feel that you have to agree to find a nice home for your horse.
 

Ruth_Cymru

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I'm going to view a horse tomorrow, and I just wouldn't ask if I could have a trial, and I know that I'm an honest person! there are too many if's and but's. If I like the horse that much I would ask to visit a few times if I was unsure. I hope it all works out for you
 

f_s_

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I'm selling at the moment, and have agreed that if someone wants her, they can have a trial...but, only at my yard!!!

I wouldn't let my horse go off the yard without full payment, as horses can be returned in all sorts of states.

I hope it works out for you, but, please be careful!
 

Mrs_Wishkabibble

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I would (and have) insisted on full payment on collection with the signed declaration that should the horse not be suitable for xyz then he/she can be returned for a full refund as long as they are returned in as good as or better condition than when they went.
I wouldn't allow a month either, 2 weeks is plenty I would think.
Good luck
 

millitiger

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no way would i let a horse go out on trial- imo, not only is it not fair on the horse to expect it to behave the way it does at home in a short period but also the legal pitfalls of a trial are huge and could work out very costly if it all goes wrong.

tell them they can try it as many times as they like at your yard
 

smokeybabes

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Thanks guys.
I did have doubts and have been umming and ahhing about it but thought maybe i was being unreasonable. But the fact that you guys have said you wouldn't let your horse out on trial or wouldn't ask for a trial if you were buying kinda suggests i'm not being unreasonable.
Think i'll still go and see their yard and mention these things to them and see what they say and maybe suggest they come to my yard a couple more times.
 

KS1

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I have heard of too many horses going on a trial loan only to be sold on and never seen or heard of again. So would I permit any horse of mine to go on a trail, no never...not even for one day.....
 

kerilli

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i always let mine go on a month's trial BUT i ask for full payment, and for them to insure the horse for the first month ideally. i keep the money in an account so that i can return it immediately if the horse doesn't suit and they decide to return it (hasn't happened so far.)
NO WAY would i let the horse leave my yard without full payment. "possession is 9/10ths of the law" and all that. once they've got the horse, it might be impossible to see a penny of the money they owe you. i know too many people who have been stung. ask for bank transfer direct into your account, or cash, too. bank drafts etc can be counterfeit...
 

teddyt

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I havnt read all the replies but i personally would never let a horse go on trial. Numerous reasons-
1) It takes time for a horse to settle in a new home. 1 month isnt long enough
2) If the horse gets injured/laminitis/colic/etc etc then they dont have to buy and you are potentially left with an unsaleable horse
3) The buyer is inclined to try to do too much too soon because they have a month to make up their mind. If they had bought it without trial it would be unusual to try to do everything with a new horse in just 4 weeks.
4) If they send it back for whatever reason then you have to advertise again. It may also put other buyers off because they will have to be told the horse has been on trial and come back.
5) It is unfair on the horse if it is returned. Moving here there and everywhere how is it expected to be settled and well behaved?

And finally.... a much better option is to let the buyer come as many times as they like and do whatever they like from the current home. If they are not prepared to travel several times then they dont deserve the horse.

Trials are far too risky for the horse and seller. DONT DO IT!
 

ttt

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I have just sold my horse. They wanted 1 months trial. They paid in full before he went and I have told them that I will biuy him back at the end of the month if he is not suitable. I can't see him coming back though, they were really nice people and he was exactly what they were looking for.
 

MagicMelon

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I would never let mine go on trial. I let one of mine go on a 2 week trial years ago and the woman phoned up 3 days in and said she didnt want him because her equine dentist said he had dodgy hips (WTF?!). So she chucked him on a lorry and paid some farmer to bring him back to me - it should have been a 2 1/2 hour drive, it took ALL day - I was freaking out where my horse was. The farmer clearly had no idea about horses as he'd stopped for a nap and lunch etc.!!! Horse was drenched in sweat when he arrived home (normally great traveller) with no boots or anything on so he'd rubbed his tail. And she hadnt included all his tack so that came 3 days later
Never ever again.
 

ihatework

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I think it's sad in this day and age that so many people would sell a horse and not consider some sort of trial to make sure the pair were compatible.

What I would suggest is the following:
Not a trial but a set period of time in which you will offer a full refund if the horse is found to have vices etc that were not disclosed at selling or a refund minus 10% for a non-compatible horse on the provision that the horse is returned in the state it left the yard.

I would use a period of 2 weeks rather than a month, and would insist on the horse being vetted before it leaves (so you have proof that you sent a sound horse).

As a buyer I think I would be very pleased to be given this option if buying a horse.
 
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